Daily Archives: February 14, 2016

1. John Kress – Perspectives on Limits to Growth: Challenges to Building a Sustainable Planet


Smithsonian

Published on Mar 5, 2012

The Club of Rome and the Smithsonian Institution’s Consortium for Understanding and Sustaining a Biodiverse Planet hosted a symposium on March 1, 2012 to celebrate the 40th anniversary of the launching of Limits to Growth, the first report to the Club of Rome published in 1972. This book was one of the earliest scholarly works to recognize that the world was fast approaching its sustainable limits. Forty years later, the planet continues to face many of the same economic, social, and environmental challenges as when the book was first published.

The morning session focused on the lessons of Limits to Growth. The afternoon session addressed the difficult challenges of preserving biodiversity, adjusting to a changing climate, and solving the societal issues now facing the planet. The symposium ended with a thought-provoking panel discussion among the speakers on future steps for building a sustainable planet.

W. John Kress is the Director of the Consortium for Understanding and Sustaining a Biodiverse Planet at the Smithsonian as well as curator and research scientist with the Department of Botany at the National Museum of Natural History. He was born in Illinois and received his education at Harvard University (B. A. 1975) and Duke University (Ph. D. 1981) where he studied tropical biology, ethnobotany, evolution, and plant systematics. Among his many scientific and popular papers on tropical biology are his books entitled Heliconia: An Identification Guide, Heliconias — Las Lamaradas de la Selva Colombiana, A New Century of Biology (with Gary Barrett), A Checklist of the Trees, Shrubs, Herbs, and Climbers of Myanmar, and Plant Conservation — A

Natural History Approach (with Gary Krupnick). His book The Weeping Goldsmith (Abbeville Press) describes his experiences exploring for plants in the isolated country of Myanmar. Dr. Kress is also interested in the intersection of science and art. To this end he has published two original art projects: one called Botanica Magnifica (Abbeville Press) with photographer Jonathan Singer, and the second a book on plant evolution, entitled The Art of Plant Evolution (Kew Publications), with Dr. Shirley Sherwood using contemporary botanical art to illustrate the diversity of the plant world. He is a Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science and currently Executive Director of the Association for Tropical Biology and Conservation. Dr. Kress is an Adjunct Professor of Biology at the Xishuangbanna Tropical Botanical Garden, Chinese Academy of Sciences in Yunnan.

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Lester Brown: The Planet’s Scarcest Resource Is Time

The Nation

Uploaded on Mar 18, 2011

In this eleventh video in the series “Peak Oil and a Changing Climate” from The Nation and On The Earth Productions, analyst, author and founder of the Earth Policy Institute Lester Brown discusses how unprepared the world really is for the growing effects of climate change. “Economists doing supply and demand projections are largely unaware” of the scale of the resource crises facing the world, Brown says, and “food is going to be the weak link for our civilization as it was for so many earlier civilizations.”

To learn more about “Peak Oil and a Changing Climate,” and to see the other videos in the series, visit www.TheNation.com.

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Food-Matters

Oren Lyons – A Call to Consciousness on Climate Change


Smithsonian

Published on Jun 30, 2008

Complete Video – http://www.nmai.si.edu/iss/2008/me_we…

Oren Lyons (Onondaga)
Oren Lyons was born in 1930 and raised in the traditional lifeways of the Haudenosaunee on the Seneca and Onondaga reservations in northern New York State. After serving in the army, Lyons graduated in 1958 from the Syracuse University College of Fine Arts. He then pursued a career in commercial art in New York City. A noted American Indian artist, he has exhibited his paintings widely.

Since returning to western New York in 1970 and joining the faculty of SUNY Buffalo, Chief Lyons has been a leading advocate for American Indian causes. Faithkeeper of the Turtle Clan of the Onondaga Nation, and a member of the Council of Chiefs of the Haudenosaunee, he is respected internationally as an eloquent spokesperson. In 1982, he helped to establish the Working Group on Indigenous Populations within the United Nations and has taken part in meetings of the U.N. Human Rights Commission. He also serves on the executive committee of the Global Forum of Spiritual and Parliamentary Leaders on Human Survival, and is a principal figure in the Traditional Circle of Indian Elders, grassroots leadership council of the major Indian nations of North America.

Chief Lyons has authored or edited numerous books including Native People Address the United Nations (1994); Voice of Indigenous Peoples (1992); and Exiled in the Land of the Free: Democracy, Indian Nations, and the U.S. Constitution (1992).

Complete Video – http://www.nmai.si.edu/iss/2008/me_we…

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Winona LaDuke – A Call to Consciousness on Climate Change


Smithsonian

Published on Jun 30, 2008

Complete Video – http://www.nmai.si.edu/iss/2008/me_we…

Winona LaDuke (Anishinaabekwe [Ojibwe], enrolled member of the Mississippi Band Anishinaabeg)
Winona LaDuke is a rural development economist who has spent many years working on energy policy and energy self-sufficiency issues in Native America. The author of five books, she is the executive director of Honor the Earth, a national Native American foundation, and founding director of the White Earth Land Recovery Project on the White Earth Reservation in Minnesota.

LaDuke is a graduate of Harvard University, with graduate work at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and a master’s degree in rural development from Antioch University. Twice a U.S. vice presidential candidate, serving as Ralph Nader’s running mate and representing the Green Party in 1996 and 2000, LaDuke lives and works on the White Earth Reservation.

Complete Video – http://www.nmai.si.edu/iss/2008/me_we…

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1. Highlights – Anthropocene: Planet Earth in the Age of Humans


Smithsonian

Published on Jan 15, 2014

The Smithsonian Institution’s Grand Challenges Consortia hosted a symposium on October 11, 2012 to address the tremendous scope of transformations now occurring on the Earth with profound effects on plants, animals, and natural habitats. Geologists have proposed the term Anthropocene, or “Age of Man”, for this new period in the history of the planet. The symposium focused on the arrival and impact of this new era through the lenses of science, history, art, culture, philosophy, and economics, and promoted discussion, debate, and deliberation on these issues of change.

Speakers included Charles C. Mann, journalist and author of 1493: Uncovering the New World Columbus Created; Sabine O’Hara, Dean of the College of Agriculture, Urban Sustainability, & Environmental Sciences at the University of the District of Columbia; Richard Alley, Professor of Geosciences at Pennsylvania State University; and photographer and filmmaker Chris Jordan. Each of these presentations was followed by responses from an interdisciplinary panel of scholars to foster a wide-ranging discussion of the issues. A summation of the day’s discussion was provided by The Honorable Timothy E. Wirth, former President of the United Nations Foundation and former Congressman and Senator from Colorado.
For more information on the event, please visit: http://www.si.edu/consortia

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TED 2012: Collapse of Growth. “The most important talk of the 21st century” – Foundups®


FOUNDUPS Michael Trout

Published on Mar 10, 2012

How to we minimize the collapse of growth? Paul Guilding doesn’t say. Answer launching foundup®….

“Foundups® are ideas for saving our planet launched, validated, and funded by the people for the people that re-invest 80% of net profits launching more foundup®…. that re-invest 80% of net profits launching more foundup®…. that re-invest 80% of net profits launching more foundup®…. that re-invest 80% of net profits launching more foundup®…. until we save our bees, our rivers, our forests, our oceans, our GMO free seeds, our freedom, our liberty and the 50% of our fellow creatures headed for extinction. ” – FOUNDUPS®COM Michael J. Trout, CEO

This talk marks the moment a innovation paradigm crossed the chasm to become an early adapter paradigm. Climate change did it 40 years ago… over the next 3-5 years End of Growth will become bigger than Climate Change paradigm. Please watch the playlist to learn more about End of Growth paradigm.

A FOUNDUPS® mashup of Paul Gilding TED GLOBAL March 2012 talk.
(To add this talk to your YouTube Channel click “remix” and “save” – please rip and share! — thanks). Can we save the world from Godzilla? Is one actually coming? Please post what you think. (Btw, Don’t like the annotations… Remix this talk REMOVES the annotations – click “remix” and save and post. Simple.)

Background: In 1970 Emeritus Professor Dr. Dennis L. Meadows with the aid of MIT super computers predicted the End of Growth in 1972 to happen around 2030-2050.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dennis_M…

This research was backed and funded by a very prestigious think tank The Club of Rome
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Club_of_…

Dennis Meadows – Preparing cities for the age of declining oil


DSA2012ensavt

Published on Jul 23, 2012

Cette conférence de Dennis Meadows, introduite par Sébastien Marot, a été donnée le 23 novembre 2011 à l’école d’architecture de la ville et des territoires dans le cadre du séminaire de lancement du programme “Ignis Mutat Res: Penser l’architecture, la ville et les paysages au prisme de l’énergie”, organisé par le Ministère de la culture, le Ministère de l’Environnement et l’Atelier International du Grand Paris.

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5. Dennis Meadows – Perspectives on the Limits of Growth: It is too late for sustainable development


Smithsonian

Published on Mar 9, 2012

Roberto Peccei
Roberto D. Peccei is a Professor of Physics and Astronomy at UCLA, a member of the Executive Committee of the Club of Rome, and President of the Fondazione Aurelio Peccei. As a physicist his principal interests lie in the interface between particle physics and cosmology, and as a member of the Club of Rome he is broadly interested in the kind of economics that need to be
developed to ensure a sustainable world. Peccei was born in Italy, completed his secondary school in Argentina, and came to the United States in 1958 to pursue university studies in physics. He obtained a B.S. from MIT in 1962, and M.S. from NYU in 1964 and a Ph.D. from MIT in 1969. After a brief period of postdoctoral work at the University of Washington, he joined the faculty of Stanford University in 1971. In 1978, he returned to Europe as a staff
member of the Max Planck Institute in Munich, Germany. He joined the Deutsches Elektron Synchrotron (DESY) Laboratory in Hamburg, Germany, as the Head of the Theoretical Group in 1984. He returned to the United States in 1989, joining the faculty of the Department of Physics at UCLA. Soon thereafter, he became Chair of the Department, a position he held until becoming Dean of the Division of Physical Sciences of the College of Letters and Sciences in1994. For the last decade, he was Vice Chancellor for Research at UCLA, overseeing all research programs in
the university. In July of 2010, he returned to the faculty. Peccei was the Schroedinger Professor at the University of Vienna in 1983, the Boris Jacobsohn Lecturer at the University of Washington in 1986, the Phi Beta Kappa Lecturer at UCLA and the Emilio Segre Professor at the University of Tel Aviv in 1992, and delivered the first Abdus Salam Memorial Lecture in
Pakistan in 1997. He has served on numerous advisory boards both in Europe and the United States in the last 25 years. He presently also serves as the Chair of the External Advisory Board of the Institute for the Physics and Mathematics of the Universe in Japan. He is a Fellow of the
American Physical Society, the Institute of Physics in the United Kingdom, the American Association for the Advancement of Science, and the World Academy of Arts and Sciences.

Dennis Meadows
It Is Too Late for Sustainable Development
My formal remarks will have three goals: explain the essential and still unique contribution of our 1972 report to the Club of Rome, describe how my own understanding about the interaction of limits with physical growth on the planet has changed over the past 40 years, and justify my proposal that humanity’s focus should now be more on resilience than on sustainability. It is far
too late to achieve sustainable development, as that term is commonly understood. A precipitous decline in resource and energy use is coming in the next decades, and the most important goal now is to adopt policies that will reduce its negative impacts on the values that are most important to us.
Dennis Meadows was appointed to the MIT faculty in 1969. In 1970 he assembled a team of 16 scientists to conduct a two-year, computer-model based study on the long-term causes and consequences of physical growth on the planet Earth. That project was funded by the Club of
Rome and lead to 3 reports, one of which, The Limits to Growth, was presented for the first time to the public in the Smithsonian Institution Castle in March 1972. The book was eventually translated into about 35 languages, and it was selected as one of the most influential environmental books of the 20th century. He worked subsequently with Jørgen Randers and with
Donella Meadows, senior author of Limits to Growth, to produce a second edition in 1994 and a third edition in 2004. Before becoming Professor Emeritus of Policy Systems in 2004, Dennis Meadows was a professor for 35 years at MIT, Dartmouth College, and the University of New
Hampshire earning tenure in schools of engineering, management, and the social sciences. He has received numerous honorary doctorates in the US and Europe for his contributions to environmental education. His many awards include the 2009 Japan Prize. He has co-authored 10 books and designed numerous computer-based strategic planning games that are used in many
nations to teach principles of sustainable resource use. He remains very active, especially in Europe and Japan, speaking, writing, and advising corporate and government leaders on issues related to growth.

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The Club of Rome and Limits To Growth: Achieving the Best Possible Future


Santa Fe Institute

Published on Apr 10, 2012

Dennis Meadows, former Director of the Institute for Policy and Social Science Research at the University of New Hampshire
July 13, 2010

It is now too late to prevent serious effects for our society from climate change and fossil fuel depletion. But there are still many ways to prepare for future problems, and thereby achieve the best possible future.

Dennis Meadows, co-author of the 1972 report, Limits to Growth, will summarize some recent research on the timing and the magnitude of future growth limits, and he will sketch out some initiatives that can usefully be taken now at the state and regional level.

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