Daily Archives: February 10, 2016

This is How Sahara Desert Was Made (Full Length Documentary)


Educational Documentary

Published on May 9, 2014

Global Climate Change
Environmental Justice
Environment Ethics

2 Ancient African Civilisation in the Sahara

Torahrevival

Uploaded on Jan 8, 2008

http://www.youtube.com/AfricansArise

Historian Basil Davidson looks at ancient rock paintings in Zimbabwe of civilised black-skinned African peoples. “The evidence of these paintings suggests a continuous community of peoples, lving right across the Saharah from the Atlantic to the valley of the Nile.”

As the Sahara was overtaken by desert around 2000 BCE, these peoples moved southwards and eastwards.
http://www.lincoln.edu/history/his307/

Global Climate Change
Environmental Justice
Environment Ethics

Can West Africa Grow Enough Food to Feed Itself? Innovating African Agriculture

World Bank

Published on Feb 10, 2016

The West Africa Agricultural Productivity Program (WAAPP) works with farmers, agribusinesses and researchers across 13 West African countries to develop and distribute agriculture innovations and build a sustainable food system for the region. To view more videos on WAAPP, click on the following links: https://youtu.be/J2n82lN_x8k https://youtu.be/U6Thzt6w3JA

Global Climate Change
Environmental Justice
Environment EthicsFood-Matters

Women in Agriculture and Food Production Exhibit in the Library | UMass Sustainable Food and Farming Program

The UMass Amherst Libraries host “Growing Season: Women in Agriculture and Food Production,” through August 15, 2016, in the W.E.B. Du Bois Library, both on the Lower Level and in Special Collections and University Archives, on Floor 25, at the University of Massachusetts Amherst.

On the Lower Level, “Growing Season” focuses on the growth and encouragement of women in agriculture and food production at Massachusetts Agricultural College (MAC or “Mass Aggie,” the precursor to UMass Amherst and the home of the Stockbridge School of Agriculture) from the 1910s through the 1930s. With growing local food supply issues from 1900-1920 due to WWI and population movement from farms to cities, MAC started special and short course programs that engaged women in practical agriculture, like gardening, fruit growing, dairying and also rural social services and home economics. The growing Extension Service program reached out to rural and farm community members with instructional workshops and pamphlets.

See also:

…(read more).

Global Climate Change
Environment Ethics
Environment Justice
Food-Matters

Climate change ‘to make transatlantic flights longer’ – BBC News

By Matt McGrath Environment correspondent

  • 10 February 2016

Image copyright Getty Images Image caption Transatlantic flights will be quicker coming from the US to Europe but significantly slower going the other way

Flights from the UK to the US could take longer due to the changes in the climate, according to a new study.

Global warming is likely to speed up the jet stream, say researchers, and slow down aeroplanes heading for the US.

While eastbound flights from the US will be quicker, roundtrip journeys will “significantly lengthen”.

The University of Reading scientists believe the changes will increase carbon emissions and fuel consumption and potentially raise ticket prices.

The study has been published in the journal Environmental Research Letters.

Speedy streams

High altitude jet streams in the northern and southern hemisphere are the powerful winds that help move weather systems around the globe.

Air traffic normally tries to take advantage of these speedy flows of the Atlantic jet stream from west to east to reduce journey times on routes between Europe and North America.

…(read more).

See:

 

 

Global Climate Change
Environment Ethics
Environment Justice

How jet stream is making UK-US return flights longer – BBC News

BBC Weather’s Chris Fawkes explains how the jet stream is making return flights between the UK and US longer.

Read more

Climate change ‘to make transatlantic flights longer’

Global Climate Change
Environment Ethics
Environment Justice

Will Global Warming Heat Us Beyond Our Physical Limits?

In India last May, temperatures rose to 120°F (50°C), killing more than 2,300 people—and melting this street in New Delhi.

Phootgraph by Harish Tyagi, EPA

If we don’t cut greenhouse gases, it’s not just storms and rising seas we’d have to worry about. The heat alone could kill a lot of us. By Cheryl Katz, National Geographic

PUBLISHED December 15, 2015

If greenhouse gas emissions are not reduced, rising temperatures and humidity wrought by global warming could expose hundreds of millions of people worldwide to potentially lethal heat stress by 2060, a new report suggests.

The greatest exposure will occur in populous, tropical regions such as India, Southeast Asia, the Middle East, and Africa. But even in the northeastern United States, as many as 30 million people might be exposed at least once a year to heat that could be lethal to children, the elderly, and the sick, according to the new study.

It’s the first study to look at future heat stress on a global basis, says Ethan Coffel, a PhD candidate in atmospheric sciences at Columbia University, who presented the results on Monday at the American Geophysical Union meeting in San Francisco. Coffel and his colleagues used climate models and population projections to estimate how many people could face dangerous heat in 2060—assuming that greenhouse gas emissions continue to rise sharply on a “business-as-usual” course.

The findings are based on forecasts of “wet bulb” temperatures, in which a wet cloth is wrapped around a thermometer bulb. Whereas standard thermometer readings measure air temperature, a wet bulb measures the temperature of a moist surface that has been cooled as much as possible by evaporation.

…(read more).

See:

Global Climate Change
Environment Ethics
Environment Justice

Heat stress and societal impacts in the 21st century

Heat is the number-one weather related killer in the US and around the world. As a result of rising temperatures and steady or slightly rising levels of specific humidity, heat stress is projected to become increasingly severe. Here we show that heat stress as measured by two common indices — the heat index and the wet-bulb temperature — is projected to rapidly and dramatically increase, and that by mid-century crippling summertime conditions are possible across some of the most densely populated regions of the planet. Many of these regions are places where cooling infrastructure is scarce, adaptive capacity is low, and populations are rapidly rising. We find that by the end of the 21st century, the habitability of some regions of the planet may be questionable due to heat stress alone, and in many other regions severe impacts to human health, infrastructure, agriculture, and economic performance will create significant societal stress and necessitate rapid adaptation.

…(read more).

Global Climate Change
Environment Ethics
Environment Justice

Noam Chomsky – On Activism, Climate Change, & His Message to the Future (2014)

The Public

Published on Jul 5, 2014

Noam Chomsky reflects on climate change, activism, and shares the lessons he’s gleaned from his life: what his advice would be for present and future generations concerned about the fate of the planet.

For more interviews visit www.thepublicradio.org Or subscribe to the Podcast in iTunes – https://itunes.apple.com/ca/podcast/t

Interview recorded May 2014 for the Toronto, Canada radio program The Public.
Interviewer: Kevin Caners

Global Climate Change
Environmental Justice
Environment Ethics

Worst Case Climate Change (2008 TED Talk)

Kevin Surace
Published on May 18, 2014

In February 2008 I gave a talk at TED in Monterey CA. It was a TED-U talk for about 20 minutes. That talk was recorded but never posted online. The idea was to take best case or nominal case climate change off the table, and just for the sake of it…discuss worst case scenarios. No one was giving a talk like this…it was a bit too scary. Many people left the session in tears.
When I returned from TED we recorded the same talk in a studio even though I was sick (in this video). That was never seen or posted until now (May 2014), more than 6 years later. I remember being sick that day but doing it anyway.
What is most interesting is to look forward from 2008 when this was taped and see what predictions have come closer to reality (arctic ice melt and antarctic as well) and which have not. Regardless of one’s beliefs or political convictions, the ideas and science here make for great conversation. Hopefully none come true.

Global Climate Change
Environmental Justice
Environment Ethics