Daily Archives: February 6, 2016

Has the U.S. motto become ‘In Nothing We Trust’?


PBS NewsHour

Published on Feb 5, 2016

Only 19 percent of Americans trust the government to do the right thing most of the time, according to a recent Pew Research poll, down from 77 percent in 1964. This lack of trust isn’t limited to the government — Americans today distrust everything from churches to public schools. Journalist Jeff Greenfield offers an essay on how we became a nation of doubters.

Global Climate Change
Environment Ethics
Environment Justice

Florida prepares for statewide emergency over Zika Virus


RT America

Published on Feb 5, 2016

Health officials in Florida have declared a state of emergency in four of the state’s counties over the Zika Virus outbreak, asking people to refrain from having unprotected sex or suggesting to abstain altogether. RT’s Marina Portnaya reports from Miami and takes a look at the government’s response to the crisis.

Global Climate Change
Environment Ethics
Environment Justice
Public Health

Pentagon releases 200 Bush-era torture photos after decade-long battle


RT America

Published on Feb 5, 2016

Defense Department officials have released 198 Bush-era photographs of detainees mistreated and abused by US forces in Iraq and Afghanistan, after a 12-year battle against the ACLU to keep those images from the public. RT’s Alexey Yaroshevsky gives us the details.

Global Climate Change
Environment Ethics
Environment Justice

Michigan Governor’s Office Knew of Flint Water Poisoning in March


TheRealNews

Published on Feb 5, 2016

Detroit-based Pastor David Alexander Bullock discusses new documents that show the government allowing General Motors to switch water sources while keeping the general population at risk

Global Climate Change
Environment Ethics
Environment Justice

Poisoned in Flint, Michigan


Acronym TV

Published on Feb 5, 2016

Global Climate Change
Environment Ethics
Environment Justice

CM Webinar All Things Climate Models


climatecentraldotorg

Published on Feb 4, 2016

Featuring Keith Dixon, Research Meteorologist at NOAA’s Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory (GFDL)

Global Climate Change
Environment Ethics
Environment Justice

The Shum Show: February 05, 2016


climatecentraldotorg

Published on Feb 5, 2016

While groundhogs certainly aren’t meteorologists, Punxsutawney Phil may have stumbled on a climate change trend! Stay up to date on all your climate and weather news with the Shum Show with Climate Central’s Multimedia Journalism Fellow, Greta Shum.

Global Climate Change
Environment Ethics
Environment Justice

The Hidden Meltdown of Greenland 2015 NASA ScienceCasts; Ice Sheet Melting from Global Warming

Published on Sep 8, 2015
more at http://news.quickfound.net/intl/green…

“NASA-supported researchers have found that ice covering Greenland is melting faster than previously thought. The action is happening out of sight, below the surface.”

Public domain film from NASA.

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/b…
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Greenla…

The Greenland ice sheet (Greenlandic: Sermersuaq) is a vast body of ice covering 1,710,000 square kilometres (660,000 sq mi), roughly 80% of the surface of Greenland.

It is the second largest ice body in the world, after the Antarctic Ice Sheet. The ice sheet is almost 2,400 kilometres (1,500 mi) long in a north-south direction, and its greatest width is 1,100 kilometres (680 mi) at a latitude of 77°N, near its northern margin. The mean altitude of the ice is 2,135 metres (7,005 ft).[1] The thickness is generally more than 2 km (1.2 mi) and over 3 km (1.9 mi) at its thickest point. It is not the only ice mass of Greenland – isolated glaciers and small ice caps cover between 76,000 and 100,000 square kilometres (29,000 and 39,000 sq mi) around the periphery. If the entire 2,850,000 cubic kilometres (684,000 cu mi) of ice were to melt, it would lead to a global sea level rise of 7.2 m (24 ft). The Greenland Ice Sheet is sometimes referred to under the term inland ice, or its Danish equivalent, indlandsis. It is also sometimes referred to as an ice cap.

The ice in the current ice sheet is as old as 110,000 years. The presence of ice-rafted sediments in deep-sea cores recovered off of northeast Greenland, in the Fram Strait, and south of Greenland indicated the more or less continuous presence of either an ice sheet or ice sheets covering significant parts of Greenland for the last 18 million years. From just before 11 million years ago to a little after 10 million years ago, the Greenland Ice Sheet appears to have been greatly reduced in size. The Greenland Ice Sheet formed in the middle Miocene by coalescence of ice caps and glaciers. There was an intensification of glaciation during the Late Pliocene.

The weight of the ice has depressed the central area of Greenland; the bedrock surface is near sea level over most of the interior of Greenland, but mountains occur around the periphery, confining the sheet along its margins. If the ice disappeared, Greenland would most probably appear as an archipelago, at least until isostasy lifted the land surface above sea level once again. The ice surface reaches its greatest altitude on two north-south elongated domes, or ridges. The southern dome reaches almost 3,000 metres (10,000 ft) at latitudes 63°–65°N; the northern dome reaches about 3,290 metres (10,800 ft) at about latitude 72°N. The crests of both domes are displaced east of the centre line of Greenland. The unconfined ice sheet does not reach the sea along a broad front anywhere in Greenland, so that no large ice shelves occur. The ice margin just reaches the sea, however, in a region of irregular topography in the area of Melville Bay southeast of Thule. Large outlet glaciers, which are restricted tongues of the ice sheet, move through bordering valleys around the periphery of Greenland to calve off into the ocean, producing the numerous icebergs that sometimes occur in North Atlantic shipping lanes. The best known of these outlet glaciers is Jakobshavn Isbræ (Greenlandic: Sermeq Kujalleq), which, at its terminus, flows at speeds of 20 to 22 metres or 66 to 72 feet per day.

On the ice sheet, temperatures are generally substantially lower than elsewhere in Greenland. The lowest mean annual temperatures, about −31 °C (−24 °F), occur on the north-central part of the north dome, and temperatures at the crest of the south dome are about −20 °C (−4 °F). During winter, the ice sheet takes on a clear blue/green color. During summer, the top layer of ice melts leaving pockets of air in the ice that makes it look white…

The melting ice sheet

Positioned in the Arctic, the Greenland ice sheet is especially vulnerable to climate change. Arctic climate is now rapidly warming and much larger Arctic shrinkage changes are projected…

If the entire 2,850,000 km3 (684,000 cu mi) of ice were to melt, global sea levels would rise 7.2 m (24 ft). Recently, fears have grown that continued climate change will make the Greenland Ice Sheet cross a threshold where long-term melting of the ice sheet is inevitable. Climate models project that local warming in Greenland will be 3 °C (5 °F) to 9 °C (16 °F) during this century. Ice sheet models project that such a warming would initiate the long-term melting of the ice sheet, leading to a complete melting of the ice sheet (over centuries), resulting in a global sea level rise of about 7 metres (23 ft)…

Global Climate Change
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Arctic Death Sprial and the Methane Time Bomb


The Eco-Logic Channel

Published on Nov 16, 2013

The Arctic Death Sprial and the Methane Time Bomb
Many thanks to:

Peter Sinclair Greenman Studios
David Suzuki David Suzuki Foundation
Dr. Guy McPherson University of Arizona (Ret.)
Dr. Richard Somerville Stanford University
Severn Cullis-Suzuki Activist
Thom Hartmann The Man
Dr. Natalia Shakhova International Arctic Research
Nick Breeze Filmmaker
Dr. James Hansen NASA (Ret.)
Dr. Alun Hubbard Aberystwyth University
Dr. Marco Tedesco NOAA
James Balog Filmmaker “Chasing Ice”
Dr. Peter Wadhams University of Cambridge
David Wasdell Apollo-Gaia Project
Omar Cabrera Methanetracker.org
Lester R. Brown Earth Policy Institute
Dr. Richard Milne University of Edinburgh
Dan Miller A Really Inconvenient Truth
Dr. Charles Miller NASA JPL
Dr. Kevin Schaefer USNSIDC
Dr. Jason Box GEUS
Ben Abbott University of Alasaka
John Tyndall Tyndall Centre
Uli Hamacher Filmmaker
Dr. Igor Semiletov International Arctic Research
Dr. Richard Allen Penn State University

Global Climate Change
Environment Ethics
Environment Justice

The History of Ice Age Era’s


uppressed Human

Published on Feb 16, 2015

An ice age is a period of long-term reduction in the temperature of Earth’s surface and atmosphere, resulting in the presence or expansion of continental and polar ice sheets and alpine glaciers. Within a long-term ice age, individual pulses of cold climate are termed “glacial periods” (or alternatively “glacials” or “glaciations” or colloquially as “ice age”), and intermittent warm periods are called “interglacials”. Glaciologically, ice age implies the presence of extensive ice sheets in the northern and southern hemispheres. By this definition, we are in an interglacial period—the holocene—of the ice age that began 2.6 million years ago at the start of the Pleistocene epoch, because the Greenland, Arctic, and Antarctic ice sheets still exist.

The causes of ice ages are not fully understood for either the large-scale ice age periods or the smaller ebb and flow of glacial–interglacial periods within an ice age. The consensus is that several factors are important: atmospheric composition, such as the concentrations of carbon dioxide and methane (the specific levels of the previously mentioned gases are now able to be seen with the new ice core samples from EPICA Dome C in Antarctica over the past 800,000 years ); changes in the earth’s orbit around the Sun known as Milankovitch cycles; the motion of tectonic plates resulting in changes in the relative location and amount of continental and oceanic crust on the earth’s surface, which affect wind and ocean currents; variations in solar output; the orbital dynamics of the Earth-Moon system; and the impact of relatively large meteorites, and volcanism including eruptions of supervolcanoes.[citation needed]

Some of these factors influence each other. For example, changes in Earth’s atmospheric composition (especially the concentrations of greenhouse gases) may alter the climate, while climate change itself can change the atmospheric composition (for example by changing the rate at which weathering removes CO2).

Maureen Raymo, William Ruddiman and others propose that the Tibetan and Colorado Plateaus are immense CO2 “scrubbers” with a capacity to remove enough CO2 from the global atmosphere to be a significant causal factor of the 40 million year Cenozoic Cooling trend. They further claim that approximately half of their uplift (and CO2 “scrubbing” capacity) occurred in the past 10 million years.

Global Climate Change
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Environment Justice