Daily Archives: December 4, 2015

The Global Poor vs. the 10%: How Climate Inequality Hurts the Most Vulnerable and Least Responsible


Democracy Now!

Published on Dec 2, 2015

A new report by Oxfam has found the richest 10 percent of the world’s population produce half of the Earth’s climate-harming fossil fuel emissions. The poorest half – about 3.5 billion people – are responsible for only around 10 percent of total greenhouse gas emissions. Oxfam’s report is titled “Extreme Carbon Inequality: Why the Paris climate deal must put the poorest, lowest emitting and most vulnerable people first.” We speak with the report’s author Tim Gore, head of policy for Oxfam International on food, land rights and climate change.

See:

Extreme Carbon Inequality | Oxfam International

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Global Climate Change
Environment Ethics
Environment Justice

Extreme Carbon Inequality | Oxfam International

Why the Paris climate deal must put the poorest, lowest emitting and most vulnerable people first

Downloads

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Extreme Carbon Inequality: Why the Paris climate deal must put the poorest, lowest emitting and most vulnerable people first 309.49 KB

mb-extreme-carbon-inequality-021215-es.pdf

La desigualdad extrema de las emisiones de carbono (Spanish version) 402.95 KB

mb-extreme-carbon-inequality-021215-fr.pdf

Inégalités extrêmes et émissions de CO2 (French version) 349.88 KB

About this paper

Author:
Timothy Gore, Head of Policy, Advocacy and Research, Oxfam’s GROW campaign
Post date:
2 December 2015

Climate change is inextricably linked to economic inequality: it is a crisis that is driven by the greenhouse gas emissions of the ‘haves’ that hits the ‘have-nots’ the hardest. While COP21 in Paris will see a deal negotiated between governments on the basis of the total emissions produced in their territories, the real winners and losers will be their citizens. The true test of the deal will be whether it delivers something for the poorest people who are both the least responsible for and the most vulnerable to climate change, wherever they live.

In this briefing Oxfam presents new data analysis that demonstrates the extent of global carbon inequality by estimating and comparing the lifestyle consumption emissions of rich and poor citizens in different countries.

…(read more).

Global Climate Change
Environment Ethics
Environment Justice

Why I Quit Homesteading After My First Year


Fouch-o-matic Off Grid

Published on Oct 21, 2015

This one is a little vulnerable, but I think it’s worth it. This life isn’t always easy.

Global Climate Change
Environment Ethics
Environment Justice

How the benefits of climate action may outweigh the costs


PBS NewsHour

Published on Dec 3, 2015

For two economists, the probability of true catastrophe due to human-caused global warming prompted them to write “Climate Shock: The Economic Consequences of a Hotter Planet,” which examines looming dangers and possible solutions. Economics correspondent Paul Solman takes a look at how we might weigh the costs and benefits of taking serious action to prevent disaster.

Global Climate Change
Environment Ethics
Environment Justice

Days of Revolt: The Most Brazen Corporate Power Grab in American History


TheRealNews

Published on Nov 17, 2015

In this episode of teleSUR’s Days of Revolt, Chris Hedges and organizer Kevin Zeese break down the terms of the Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP), and detail the upcoming demonstrations organized against it.

TPP-Nader

Global Climate Change
Environment Ethics
Environment Justice

Will COP21 Lead to Markets and an Unenforceable Agreement?


TheRealNews

Published on Dec 3, 2015

Chris Williams and Amy Miller discuss the shortcomings of market-based solutions and global agreements without mechanisms of accountability

Global Climate Change
Environment Ethics
Environment Justice

ClimateBOSTON654 – Après Paris


m Spiess

Published on Dec 3, 2015

Lee Chisholm narration: Join Us!
Invitation by 350Maine to Boston Rally
Dec 12, 2015

Global Climate Change
Environment Ethics
Environment Justice

Activists prepare for failure at the Paris climate summit and offer their own plan – Naomi Klein

http://grist.org/climate-energy/activists-prepare-for-failure-at-the-paris-climate-summit-and-offer-their-own-plan/

By Jonathan M. Katz on 3 Dec 2015 2 comments

This story was originally published by The New Republic and is reproduced here as part of the Climate Desk collaboration.

A group of radicals gathered on the periphery of the Paris climate talks Wednesday to issue a manifesto. “A transformation of the world’s entire economic system is essential,” their missive began in typically grandiose fashion. “Our economies are hardwired to fossil fuels. To overcome this carbon entanglement, countries need to implement strong climate policies, including strengthening carbon pricing and … .”

Wait a second, I mixed up my notes. That was Wednesdays’s joint press release from the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development, the International Energy Agency, the Nuclear Energy Agency, and the International Transport Forum, four of the stodgiest policy groups around. It was issued from the heart of the United Nations Climate Change Conference and Twenty-First Conference of the Parties, known semi-affectionately on the inside as “COP21.”

The radicals were at another event, far outside the well-guarded hangar walls of the Le Bourget airport complex. With them were moderates, labor leaders, community advocates, progressive politicians, and a guy in a flannel shirt who described himself during the question-and-answer session as a “possibilitator.” Like the OECD and its partners, the group at the Salle Olympe de Gouges, a multipurpose theater less than a mile from the site of two of the Nov. 13 suicide bombings, called for total transformation to stop climate change from wiping out much of the habitable world.

Unlike those groups, however, the event’s organizers have no faith that any sort of significant transformation will be possible in the accord being hammered out now. So they offered a plan of their own.

The headliner at the sold-out event (tickets were free but limited; attendees lined up for more than half an hour to get in) was Naomi Klein, the Canadian journalist and author whose 2014 book, This Changes Everything: Capitalism vs. the Climate, has become a rallying point for a large swath of the environmental movement. Colleagues and collaborators joined her onstage to launch their own vision for the future in the form of a pamphlet called “The Leap Manifesto.”

“I refuse to put our future in the hands of those cloistered at Le Bourget,” Klein said to applause. Afterward she told me independent efforts will be essential after the failure she is sure will come. “I thought there was a pretty good chance that people would leave Paris demoralized. And you know we can’t afford to lose years to depression as we did after Copenhagen” following the 2009 climate talks there, she added.

…(read more).

Global Climate Change
Environment Ethics
Environment Justice

Global Climate March — Solidarity and Resilience


350.org

Published on Dec 2, 2015

http://350.org/global-climate-march/

Across the world, the message is clear: this movement is global, resilient and unstoppable. #climatemarch

Global Climate Change
Environment Ethics
Environment Justice

Paris climate talks: The poorest countries are putting the richest to shame | Kumi Naidoo

A representative of indigenous Peruvian people at the Paris climate talks. Photograph: Stephane Mahe/Reuters

Wednesday 2 December 2015 05.52 EST Last modified on Wednesday 2 December 2015 07.52 EST

There were never more global leaders under one roof than here in Paris at the global climate negotiations on Monday. And they all talked about leadership, about fixing climate change, about not leaving an uninhabitable planet for our children. Many spoke powerful words. The French president, François Hollande, rightly called coal, oil and gas the energies of the past (he forgot nuclear). And many talked about how renewables are the future.

When Greenpeace started talking about the “carbon budget” that humanity must not exceed, governments were still in denial about the need to keep fossil fuels in the ground. This year Barack Obama justified rejecting the Keystone XL pipeline with the fact that we cannot burn all fossil fuels we’ve already found, let alone new sources.

This is a start. People power is winning. But there is still no real leadership coming from the major polluters. All of them, whether the US, Germany, China or India, would benefit if they went for a real energy revolution. Not even German chancellor, Angela Merkel – who at least signalled the end of the fossil fuel era in her speech here in Paris – demanded what we really need: governments to commit to 100% renewables for all by 2050.

But there are real leaders here in Paris. And they are standing up for their own and humanity’s survival. On 30 November, 43 of the most vulnerable countries – the countries that will be hardest hit by climate change – called for warming to be limited to 1.5C compared to pre-industrial times – the threshold we must not exceed if many countries in the Pacific and other Least Developed Countries are to survive.

The Climate Vulnerable Forum in their declaration also called for “100% renewable energy production by 2050” and demanded real action and agreed “to strengthen our own national climate actions in order to … help trigger increased commitments from all countries.

It’s countries like the Philippines, Kiribati and Morocco – the host of next year’s climate negotiations – showing this true leadership. They put richer countries to shame. And it is those wealthier countries which now need to respond to the call by the most vulnerable and offer real support. They should start by triggering those “increased commitments” the vulnerable are demanding; they should commit to 100% renewables for all right here in Paris.

(read more).

Global Climate Change
Environment Ethics
Environment Justice