Daily Archives: November 21, 2015

Ray Anderson – interviewed on necessary “paradigm shift” for sustainability.

Global Climate Change
Environment Ethics
Environment Justice

Norman Borlaug’s perspective on the necessary evolution of the Global Food System.

No “volunteers” to disappear…

Global Climate Change
Environment Ethics
Environment Justice

“A Constructed World” Opening Address, “City of 7 Billion” with Joyce Hsiang and Bimal Mendis


Yale University

Published on Nov 20, 2015

Professors Hsiang and Mendis introduce their work on a multi-year research project that considers the contemporary reality of increasing population world-wide and how it has blurred the traditional understanding of what is meant by urbanization. This lecture serves as the opening address to the symposium, “A Constructed World”, held at the Yale School of Architecture, 1-3 October 2015.

Global Climate Change
Environment Ethics
Environment Justice

How Pentagon “Exploits” Video Game Culture to Wire Youth for War


freespeechtv

Published on Nov 20, 2015

Among the issues tackled in the new documentary film “Drone” is the connection between video games and military recruitment.

Global Climate Change
Environment Ethics
Environment Justice

Sun Not Responsible for Warming


YaleClimateConnections

Published on Nov 20, 2015

Scientists are confident that recent global warming is not caused by the Sun. This 90-second video features Judith Lean, a prominent scientist at the Naval Research Laboratory in Washington, D.C.

A more indepth article on this topic can be found at our website:

http://www.yaleclimateconnections.org…

Global Climate Change
Environment Ethics
Environment Justice

Mapping Choices: London (Arabic)


climatecentraldotorg

Published on Nov 20, 2015

Global Climate Change
Environment Ethics
Environment Justice

Mapping Choices: Washington DC (German)


climatecentraldotorg

Published on Nov 20, 2015

Harvard Extension School
Global Climate Change
Environment Ethics
Environment Justice

Mapping Choices: London (Portuguese)


climatecentraldotorg

Published on Nov 20, 2015

Global Climate Change
Environment Ethics
Environment Justice

Mapping Choices: Dubai (Japanese)


climatecentraldotorg

Published on Nov 20, 2015

Global Climate Change
Environment Ethics
Environment Justice

Science and the Case for Animal Rights: Data, Case Studies, Experiments, Law (2002)


The Film Archives

Published on Nov 19, 2015

Steven M. Wise (born 1952) is an American legal scholar who specializes in animal protection issues, primatology, and animal intelligence. He teaches animal rights law at Harvard Law School, Vermont Law School, John Marshall Law School, Lewis & Clark Law School, and Tufts University School of Veterinary Medicine. He is a former president of the Animal Legal Defense Fund, and founder and president of the Nonhuman Rights Project.[1] The Yale Law Journal has called him “one of the pistons of the animal rights movement.”[2]

Wise is the author of An American Trilogy (2009), in which he tells the story of how a piece of land in Tar Heel, North Carolina, was first the home of Native Americans until they were driven into near-extinction, then a slave plantation, and finally the site of factory hog farms and the world’s largest slaughterhouse. Though the Heavens May Fall (2005), recounts the 1772 trial in England of James Somersett, a black man rescued from a ship heading for the West Indies slave markets, which gave impetus to the movement to abolish slavery in Britain and the United States (see Somersett’s Case). Drawing the Line (2002), which describes the relative intelligence of animals and human beings. And Rattling the Cage (2000), in which he argues that certain basic legal rights should be extended to chimpanzees and bonobos.

Wise’s position on animal rights is that some animals, particularly primates, meet the criteria of legal personhood, and should therefore be awarded certain rights and protections. His criteria for personhood are that the animal must be able to desire things, to act in an intentional manner to acquire those things, and must have a sense of self i.e. the animals must know that s/he exists. Wise argues that chimpanzees, bonobos, elephants, parrots, dolphins, orangutans, and gorillas meet these criteria.[4]

Wise argues that these animals should have legal personhood bestowed upon them to protect them from “serious infringements upon their bodily integrity and bodily liberty.” Without personhood in law, he writes, one is “invisible to civil law” and “might as well be dead.”[5]

He writes in “The Problem with Being a Thing” in Rattling the Cage:

“ For four thousand years, a thick and impenetrable legal wall has separated all human from all nonhuman animals. On one side, even the most trivial interests of a single species — ours — are jealously guarded. We have assigned ourselves, alone among the million animal species, the status of “legal persons.” On the other side of that wall lies the legal refuse of an entire kingdom, not just chimpanzees and bonobos but also gorillas, orangutans, and monkeys, dogs, elephants, and dolphins. They are “legal things.” Their most basic and fundamental interests — their pains, their lives, their freedoms — are intentionally ignored, often maliciously trampled, and routinely abused. Ancient philosophers claimed that all nonhuman animals had been designed and placed on this earth just for human beings. Ancient jurists declared that law had been created just for human beings. Although philosophy and science have long since recanted, the law has not.[6] ”
In Rattling the Cage, Wise offers examples of primates who he believes have suffered unjustifiably. He writes about Jerom, a chimpanzee who lived alone in a small cage in the Yerkes Regional Primate Research Center, with no access to sunlight, after being infected with one strain of HIV when he was three, another at the age of four, and a third at the age of five, before dying in 1996 at the age of 14.

Wise also tells the story of Lucy Temerlin, a six-year-old chimpanzee who learned American Sign Language from Roger Fouts, the primatologist, and was raised by Maurice K. Temerlin and Temerlin Mcclain. Fouts would arrive at Lucy’s home at 8:30 every morning, when Lucy would greet him with a hug, go to the stove, take the kettle, fill it with water from the sink, find two cups and tea bags from the cupboard, and brew and serve the tea. When she was 12, the Temerlins were no longer able to care for her. She was sent to a chimpanzee rehabilitation center in Senegal, then flown to Gambia, where she was shot and skinned by a poacher, and her feet and hands hacked off for sale as trophies.

Global Climate Change
Environment Ethics
Environment Justice