Daily Archives: November 3, 2015

The Koch Brothers Do Morning Joe

Global Climate Change
Environment Ethics
Environment Justice

Full Show 11/3/15: The Koch Brothers Do Morning Joe


The Big Picture RT

Published on Nov 3, 2015

Tonight’s Politics Panel discusses how the Republican Party is nothing more than a scam, the release of Bernie’s first TV ad, and TransCanada’s request with the State Department to delay the Keystone Pipeline. Thom discusses the Koch brother’s Morning Joe interview with the Center for Media and Democracy’s Brendan Fischer and what legalizing marijuana in Ohio would mean for the movement with the Drug Policy Alliance’s Kaitlyn Boecker. In tonight’s Daily Take Thom discusses how “free trade” is killing white Americans.

Global Climate Change
Environment Ethics
Environment Justice

Fukushima Can Now Kill You Within 45 minutes


The Big Picture RT

Published on Nov 3, 2015

Kevin Kamps, Beyond Nuclear, joins Thom. It’s been nearly 5 years since the Fukushima nuclear reactor in Japan suffered a massive meltdown after a tsunami hit the plant. And a new statement by the plant’s owners paints a sobering reality for how decontamination attempts are going.

Global Climate Change
Environment Ethics
Environment Justice
Nuclear

Have Protests Killed the Keystone XL? TransCanada Asks U.S. for Delay in Face of Likely Rejection


Democracy Now!

Published on Nov 3, 2015

The corporation behind the Keystone XL oil pipeline has asked the Obama administration to suspend its long-running review of the controversial project. On Monday, TransCanada told the State Department it wants to wait until Nebraska, a state along the pipeline’s route, gives its approval. If the delay is granted, the decision on Keystone XL would be pushed until after the 2016 election—and possibly handed to President Obama’s successor. That’s led many to speculate TransCanada is throwing a Hail Mary in the hopes the next White House occupant is a Republican. We are joined by Bill McKibben, co-founder of 350.org, an environmental group that has helped lead the multi-year grassroots campaign against the Keystone XL. “In the end, this was never really about the power of the administration,” McKibben says. “This was about the power of organized people to come together and change the script—and that’s what’s happened here.”

Global Climate Change
Environment Ethics
Environment Justice

Tapping Arizona Water For Saudi Cows | Here & Now

By buying land in America’s most productive ground for growing hay, which just happens to be a desert, Saudi Arabia’s largest dairy company now can grow food for its cows back home – all year long. (U.S. Geological Survey/NASA Landsat)

Many western states are hoping the El Niño storm system will alleviate the historic drought there and save them from the fate of other parts of the world like Saudi Arabia.

That desert nation, famous for its oil, has drained its ground water supply by growing crops like hay to feed their dairy cows. But now the Saudis have found another desert to grow hay in.

Nathan Halverson and Ike Sriskandarajah from Here & Now contributor Reveal pick up the story.

Global Climate Change
Environment Ethics
Environment Justice

We Must Hold Exxon Accountable for Deceiving the Public on Climate Climate

Greenpeace has been exposing ExxonMobil’s climate denialism for more than a decade. Photo credit: Robert Visser / Greenpeace


Annie Leonard | November 3, 2015 10:36 am
I’m still trying to process recent revelations in the LA Times and the Pulitzer-winning Inside Climate News about the extent to which ExxonMobil has worked to deny climate change. It knew about the threat of a planet warmed by burning fossil fuels as far back as the 70’s, and while publicly denying these risks, built them into its business plans. Wait, what?!

To make matters worse, ExxonMobil‘s climate denialism isn’t just a thing of the past–it’s ongoing.

While deeply shocking, it’s sadly not surprising: Greenpeace has been exposing ExxonMobil’s climate denialism for more than a decade. Yes, it’s outrageous, but now we need to turn that outrage into action to get governments and citizens to hold ExxonMobil and other fossil fuel companies legally accountable for the damage their activities have caused.

How do we know ExxonMobil is still blocking climate action?

For one, ExxonMobil remains a member of the American Legislative Exchange Council (ALEC). This corporate “bill mill” pushes climate-denying legislation on lawmakers through closed-door meetings. Greenpeace USA research revealed that ExxonMobil donated at least $1.6 million to ALEC between 1998 and 2012. A quarter of that money went to efforts to fight policy on climate change. ExxonMobil donated again to ALEC in 2014 and

although ALEC’s secrecy prevents us from knowing exactly what the money went toward, we can bet it didn’t help action on climate change.

Then there’s Willie Soon, the scientist who had insisted for years in published papers and in front of Congress that rising temperatures were merely the result of solar activity, not man-made climate change. Soon’s credibility was all but destroyed this year, when an investigation by Greenpeace and the Climate Investigations Center revealed that Soon had failed to mention the more than $1 million in fossil fuel donations he’d received for his research, including money from ExxonMobil. (The kicker? ExxonMobil had claimed in 2007 that it was no longer funding climate deniers like Soon.)

If a fossil fuel company like ExxonMobil continues to fight action on climate change even after years of its hypocrisy being exposed, what will it take to stop it?

The answer is legal action. Just like the tobacco companies that denied the harmful effects of smoking, ExxonMobil won’t stop unless it’s forced to. If that leaves you feeling even more frustrated, read on for how Greenpeace is working to make it happen!

Last month, Greenpeace Southeast Asia, Filipino typhoon survivors and local community organizations filed a complaint with the Commission on Human Rights of the Philippines. The complaint demands the launch of an immediate investigation into the responsibility of major fossil fuel companies, including ExxonMobil, Chevron, BP and Shell, for their human rights impacts resulting from climate change.

It’s an impact Filipinos know all too well. In 2013, the country was rocked by super typhoon Haiyan, a national disaster in which more than 6,000 Filipinos lost their lives and almost two million were left homeless. Intense and destructive storms like Haiyan are likely to become more common as the climate crisis intensifies. Scientists have already linked the high impact of Hurricane Sandy in New York to climate change. And while the complaint to the Commission on Human Rights is not a legal action, an investigation by the Commission could uncover evidence needed for future lawsuits.

…(read more).

Global Climate Change
Environment Ethics
Environment Justice

Weird Weather


YaleClimateConnections

Published on Nov 3, 2015

A Pittsburgh resident asks if the wild temperature swings this past spring (2015) were a result of climate change.

Global Climate Change
Environment Ethics
Environment Justice

European Green Capital


climateconference

Published on Nov 3, 2015

In a video to the Bristol Business Summit as part of the European Green Capital 2015 Summit Series, UNFCCC Executive Secretary Christiana Figueres speaks to how cities are standing together with national governments in promoting innovative solutions to climate change.

Global Climate Change
Environment Ethics
Environment Justice

Global Issues Network


climateconference

Published on Nov 3, 2015

In an address to the Global Issues Network youth conference in Brazil, Christiana Figueres talks about the long-term vision of where the world needs to be before the end of the century and how youth can help achieve this vision.

Global Climate Change
Environment Ethics
Environment Justic
Food-Matters

Elon Musk’s Brother Wants to Revolutionize Our Food System

Cole Mellino | November 3, 2015 9:16 am

The Kitchen Community staff with co-founder Kimbal Musk (center). Photo credit: The Kitchen Community

Kimbal Musk is not as well known as his brother Elon, but his work may be no less ambitious. Kimbal and Elon sold their first tech company, Zip2, for $300 million. Elon used that money to launch his next project, PayPal. But Kimbal “left Silicon Valley for culinary school, and later started opening a series of highly regarded restaurants in Colorado,” says FastCoExist.

While Elon is revolutionizing transportation and energy at Tesla, SpaceX and SolarCity, Kimbal is attempting to revolutionize the food system (though it should be noted that Kimbal maintains a role on the board at Tesla, SpaceX and other companies). He co-founded the nonprofit The Kitchen Community in 2011, which now has more than 240 Learning Gardens in schools and community organizations across the country. He was inspired to turn his restaurants into something more, so Kimbal uses profits from The Kitchen restaurants to build Learning Gardens and create curricula in Science, Engineering, Art and Math for teachers in cities throughout the U.S.

These Learning Gardens serve “as outdoor classrooms and experiential play-spaces that connect kids to real food and empower them to make healthier food choices,” says The Kitchen Community website. “They are designed to be a place where students want to learn and teachers want to teach.”

…(read more).

Global Climate Change
Environment Ethics
Environment Justice
Food-Matters