Daily Archives: November 1, 2015

What if Big Oil (and their Consultants) Hadn’t Deceived Us for Decades? | EV & N – #198 – CCTV

Exxon conducted research on global climate since the 1970s and knew that CO2 could threaten life on earth.  It is now being revealed by some of the research scientists involved that Exxon deliberately withheld important information from the public and Congress  and knowingly launched a concerted campaign to discredit the science of climate change to protect their profits as the largest and most profitable corporation in the history of money.

Some leaders in Congress and beyond are calling for an official Justice Department investigation in accord with Racketeer Influenced and Corrupt Organizations (RICO) Act — the legislation that was used to convict the tobacco companies of lying to the Congress and to the public about the cancer causing properties of tobacco.

http://ecoethics.net/2014-ENVRE120/20151101-EV&N-198-Link.html

https://www.cctvcambridge.org/node/354293

https://www.cctvcambridge.org/user/3723/history

and

For further information about the long history of Exxon’s long history of deception see:

 

The EPA Can Save the WORLD (#nokxl) – Alexis Breaks It Down


other98

Published on Mar 5, 2014

PETITION on Keystone XL: http://other98.com/secretary-kerry-yo…

Last episode, I laid down a challenge to our nation’s regulators to get tough in 2014. (http://bit.ly/BustTheBanks). Today, I throw down the gauntlet in front of the Environmental Protection Agency over the Keystone XL Pipeline.

We’re calling on the EPA to call out Secretary John Kerry, and tell him he needs to REJECT Keystone XL, or he’s going to be creating the next Climate Change WMD.

Here are the citations for the facts & figures from the show:

The Koch brothers stand to make $100 billion on Keystone XL:
http://bit.ly/keystonekoch

Earlier this year, the State Dept released their final Environmental Impact Statement for the pipeline. Here’s a roundup of the statement:
http://bit.ly/kxlenviro

Keystone will only create 35 jobs…but will create the emissions of OVER 35 MILLION cars:
http://thinkprogress.org/climate/2013…

Add YOUR comments on Keystone XL before March 7th (or after!) at:
http://bit.ly/nokxlcomment

Global Climate Change
Environment Ethics
Environment Justice

We put on a light show – on the EPA building


other98

Published on Apr 30, 2014

Last week, the Cowboy Indian Alliance rode into DC to tell President Obama to reject the Keystone XL pipeline.

We were deeply moved by their actions and courage, so we put on a little light show for them – on the EPA building.

See more here!:http://bit.ly/EPAlightshow

Global Climate Change
Environment Ethics
Environment Justice

Inside Exxon’s Great Climate Cover-Up


Democracy Now!

Published on Sep 24, 2015

A new report by InsideClimate News reveals how oil giant ExxonMobil’s own research confirmed the role of fossil fuels in global warming decades ago. By 1977, Exxon’s own senior experts had begun to warn the burning of fossil fuels could pose a threat to humanity. At first, Exxon launched an ambitious research program, outfitting a supertanker with instruments to study carbon dioxide in the air and ocean. But toward the end of the 1980s, Exxon changed course and shifted to the forefront of climate change denial. Since the 1990s, it has spent millions of dollars funding efforts to reject the science its own experts knew of decades ago.

Global Climate Change
Environment Ethics
Environment Justice

Big Oil Goes to College | Center for American Progress

Oil-College2

An Analysis of 10 Research Collaboration Contracts Between Leading Energy Companies and Major U.S. Universities

Highly profitable oil and other large corporations are increasingly turning to U.S. universities to perform their commercial research and development.

By Jennifer Washburn | Thursday, October 14, 2010 Updated October 16, 2010.

The world’s largest oil companies are showing surprising interest in financing alternative energy research at U.S. universities. Over the past decade, five of the world’s top 10 oil companies—ExxonMobil Corp., Chevron Corp., BP PLC, Royal Dutch Shell Group, and ConocoPhillips Co.—and other large traditional energy companies with a direct commercial stake in future energy markets have forged dozens of multi-year, multi-million-dollar alliances with top U.S. universities and scientists to carry out energy-related research. Much of this funding by “Big Oil” is being used for research into new sources of alternative energy and renewable energy, mostly biofuels.

Why are highly profitable oil and other large corporations increasingly turning to U.S. universities to perform their commercial research and development instead of conducting this work in-house? Why, in turn, are U.S. universities opening their doors to Big Oil? And when they do, how well are U.S. universities balancing the needs of their commercial sponsors with their own academic missions and public-interest obligations, given their heavy reliance on government research funding and other forms of taxpayer support?

The answers to these three questions are critical to energy-related research and development in our country, given the current global-warming crisis and the role that academic experts have traditionally played in providing the public with impartial research, analysis, and advice. To unpack these questions and help find answers, this report provides a detailed examination of 10 university-industry agreements that together total $833 million in confirmed corporate funding (over 10 years) for energy research funding on campus. Copies of these contractual agreements were obtained largely through state-level public record act requests (see the table on pages 13 and 14 for a list of these 10 agreements, and see page 15 for the methodology used for obtaining and analyzing them). Each agreement spells out the precise legal terms, conditions, and intellectualproperty provisions that govern how this sponsored research is carried out by the faculty and students on campus. (See methodology on page 15 for a discussion of how practices that are not required in these conflicts fit into the analysis.)

…(read more).

See also:

Global Climate Change
Environment Ethics
Environment Justice

Big Oil Goes to College: BP, ExxonMobil, Chevron, Shell Fund & Influence Research at Major Universities

Over the past five years, ExxonMobil, Chevron, BP, Royal Dutch Shell and ConocoPhillips have given millions of dollars to support energy research at top US universities. The private funds might fill a gap left by declining public investment, but a new report from the Center for American Progress warns that they also pose the risk of hijacking the universities’ research agenda and compromising academic independence. In the largest deal, British oil giant BP has a $500 million collaboration with three major publicly financed research institutions: the University of California at Berkeley, the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, and Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. [includes rush transcript]

Global Climate Change
Environment Ethics
Environment Justice

Three Lectures – 21-23 February 2012 | Sir Nicholas Stern | Climate Change and the New Industrial Revolution – Risk, economics and ethics


London School of Economics and Political Science (LSE)

Uploaded on Feb 27, 2012

Climate Change and the New Industrial Revolution – What we risk and how we should cast the economics and ethics
Speaker(s): Professor Lord Stern
Chair: Professor Judith Rees
Recorded on 21 February 2012 in Old Theatre, Old Building.

mp3 podcast and pdf slides available here – http://www2.lse.ac.uk/newsAndMedia/vi…

Five years on from the Stern Review there have been important changes in the world which are likely to have a profound impact on our response to the two defining challenges of the century; overcoming poverty and managing climate change. Lord Stern will discuss how we can bring economics and political economy to the analysis of our response to these challenges in the context of a special but difficult decade in the global economy.

The analysis of climate change has seen risk and the new-energy-industrial revolution move up the agenda in recent years, and we have learned more about prospects and mechanisms of collaboration. We require a deepening of the understanding of public policy for promoting the dynamics of transformation and managing immense risks. This should include a strong focus on key market failures. In this series of lectures, Lord Stern will outline the attractiveness of the new energy-industrial revolution and of low-carbon growth and will discuss how we can build the necessary national and international action to respond to the two defining challenges.

This is the first of the three lectures, the others take place on 22 and 23 February.

Nicholas Stern is IG Patel Professor of Economics and Government, and Chair of the Grantham Research Institute on Climate Change and the Environment, LSE.

Judith Rees is Director, LSE.

London School of Economics and Political Science (LSE)

Uploaded on Feb 27, 2012

Speaker(s): Professor Lord Stern
Chair: Professor Lord Richard Layard
Recorded on 22 February 2012 in Old Theatre, Old Building.

mp3 audio podcast and pdf slides available here – http://www2.lse.ac.uk/newsAndMedia/vi…

Five years on from the Stern Review there have been important changes in the world which are likely to have a profound impact on our response to the two defining challenges of the century; overcoming poverty and managing climate change. Lord Stern will discuss how we can bring economics and political economy to the analysis of our response to these challenges in the context of a special but difficult decade in the global economy.

The analysis of climate change has seen risk and the new-energy-industrial revolution move up the agenda in recent years, and we have learned more about prospects and mechanisms of collaboration. We require a deepening of the understanding of public policy for promoting the dynamics of transformation and managing immense risks. This should include a strong focus on key market failures. In this series of lectures, Lord Stern will outline the attractiveness of the new energy-industrial revolution and of low-carbon growth and will discuss how we can build the necessary national and international action to respond to the two defining challenges.

This is the second of the three lectures, the others take place on 21 and 23 February.

Nicholas Stern is IG Patel Professor of Economics and Government, and Chair of the Grantham Research Institute on Climate Change and the Environment, LSE.

Lecture 3:

Uploaded on Feb 27, 2012

Climate Change and the New Industrial Revolution – How we can get there: building national and international action
Speaker(s): Professor Lord Stern
Chair: Professor John Van Reenen
Recorded on 23 February 2012 in Old Theatre, Old Building.

mp3 audio podcast and pdf slides available here – http://www2.lse.ac.uk/newsAndMedia/vi…

Five years on from the Stern Review there have been important changes in the world which are likely to have a profound impact on our response to the two defining challenges of the century; overcoming poverty and managing climate change. Lord Stern will discuss how we can bring economics and political economy to the analysis of our response to these challenges in the context of a special but difficult decade in the global economy.

The analysis of climate change has seen risk and the new-energy-industrial revolution move up the agenda in recent years, and we have learned more about prospects and mechanisms of collaboration. We require a deepening of the understanding of public policy for promoting the dynamics of transformation and managing immense risks. This should include a strong focus on key market failures. In this series of lectures, Lord Stern will outline the attractiveness of the new energy-industrial revolution and of low-carbon growth and will discuss how we can build the necessary national and international action to respond to the two defining challenges.

This is the third of the three lectures, the others take place on 21 and 22 February.

Nicholas Stern is IG Patel Professor of Economics and Government, and Chair of the Grantham Research Institute on Climate Change and the Environment, LSE.

John Van Reenen is Director of the Centre for Economic Performance, LSE.

Global Climate Change
Environment Ethics
Environment Justice