Daily Archives: October 19, 2015

NOAA Climate Prediction Center Winter Outlook 2015-2016


NOAA Climate.gov

Published on Oct 15, 2015

On October 15, 2015, NOAA’s Climate Prediction Center released its outlook for precipitation and temperature for December through February and the drought outlook through January 31, 2016. The strongest El Niño signal since 1997/1998 is behind predictions for expected climate anomalies in the Pacific, Alaska, and the continental states. Highlights in the lower 48 include warmer-than average temperatures across the West and north and a wetter-than-normal winter in the southern tier.

Video produced by the Climate.gov team in cooperation with climate and Earth scientists from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration and other agencies and institutions. Any opinions voiced by people in these videos are their own; they are not official NOAA statements or opinions. Unless specifically stated otherwise, Climate.gov video productions can be freely republished or re-purposed by others.

Video produced by the Climate.gov team in cooperation with climate and Earth scientists from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration and other agencies and institutions. Any opinions voiced by people in these videos are their own; they are not official NOAA statements or opinions. Unless specifically stated otherwise, Climate.gov video productions can be freely republished or re-purposed by others.

Global Climate Change
Environment Ethics
Environment Justice

PeoplesTradePeoplesClimate647


m Spiess

Published on Oct 19, 2015

Light Brigade and Rally on National Day of Climate Action Oct 2015
Portland Maine MFCT and TCM
How TPP and FTA’s block policy space needed to mitigate climate change and what you can do today….

Global Climate Change
Environment Ethics
Environment Justice

Muzzled Scientists


The Agenda with Steve Paikin

Published on Oct 19, 2015

The greatest income inequality in 80 years. A shrinking middle class. And what he sees as a new American oligarchy. The economic system that helped make America so strong is, says Robert Reich, now failing. The former American labour secretary and author of Saving Capitalism: For the Many Not the Few joins the program to outline what it will take to fix it.

Global Climate Change
Environment Ethics
Environment Justice

Saving Capitalism


The Agenda with Steve Paikin

Published on Oct 19, 2015

The greatest income inequality in 80 years. A shrinking middle class. And what he sees as a new American oligarchy. The economic system that helped make America so strong is, says Robert Reich, now failing. The former American labour secretary and author of Saving Capitalism: For the Many Not the Few joins the program to outline what it will take to fix it.

Global Climate Change
Environment Ethics
Environment Justice

Thomas Piketty, Paul Krugman and Joseph Stiglitz: The Genius of Economics


92Y Plus

Published on Mar 6, 2015

Piketty, arguably the world’s leading expert on income and wealth inequality, does more than document the growing concentration of income in the hands of a small economic elite. He also makes a powerful case that we’re on the way back to ‘patrimonial capitalism,’ in which the commanding heights of the economy are dominated not just by wealth, but also by inherited wealth, in which birth matters more than effort and talent,” wrote Paul Krugman in The New York Times. Krugman and his fellow Nobel laureate Joseph Stiglitz (author of The Great Divide) join Piketty to discuss the genius of economics.

Global Climate Change
Environment Ethics
Environment Justice

In Germany, the mood is turning against refugees

Sean Gallup/Getty Images

A German policeman stands near migrants waiting on the bridge over the Inn river to cross into Germany on Sunday in Braunau am Inn, Austria.

by Stephen Beard Monday, October 19, 2015 – 14:37

Germany calling McKinsey to help with refugee crisis
Refugees bring in big business in Europe
Taking in refugees has costs — and potential benefits

When German Chancellor Angela Merkel threw her country’s borders open to hundreds of thousands of refugees last month, she won praise from around the world for her generosity and humanitarianism. Denigrated during the summer for being hard-hearted toward the heavily indebted Greeks, Merkel basked in a rare glow of international approval. The German people also responded generously to the migration crisis. The first arrivals were cheered and handed sweets.

But with more than a million refugees expected to have settled in Germany by the end of this year, the welcome is wearing thin. Anxieties about the sheer weight of numbers have multiplied as German authorities struggle to cope; city officials in Hamburg have seized empty office buildings to house the incomers, and schools are overwhelmed by non-German speaking children.

Fifty-one percent of Germans now say they’re worried about the migrants, up from 38 percent a month ago. Merkel’s popularity has fallen to its lowest level since the start of the euro crisis in 2011, and confidence in her ability to handle the crisis has waned.

“When she said, ‘Yes, we can!’ people thought: It’s a brave statement,” said Michael Wohlgemuth of the Open Europe think tank in Berlin. “And now people are asking her, ‘How? How can we take in such a large number of people in a short space of time?’ And there are no clear answers to that.”

…(read more).

Global Climate Change
Environment Ethics
Environment Justice

Rice … Without Methane?


YaleClimateConnections

Published on Oct 19, 2015

Scientists develop a genetically modified rice plant that grows without producing this potent global-warming gas.

Global Climate Change
Environment Ethics
Environment Justice
Food-Matters