Daily Archives: October 2, 2015

Competing to Win


NAMvideo

Published on Oct 1, 2015

Learn More at www.nam.org

Global Climate Change
Environment Ethics
Environment Justice

Ozone Standard Will Kill American Jobs


NAMvideo

Published on Oct 1, 2015

Learn more at www.nam.org/ozone

Global Climate Change
Environment Ethics
Environment Justice

Super Hurricanes and Typhoons


SpaceRip

Published on Dec 5, 2013

Hurricanes, typhoons, tropical cyclones: they are creatures of tropical seas, sweeping up heat laden waters, converting it to wind, rain, and waves. Why do a rare few evolve into colossal monsters, that leave in their wake a trail of destruction, death, and despair? Do we now face a rising tide of Super Hurricanes and Typhoons?

One reason is that more and more people are moving to coastlines around the world, drawn by a combination of jobs and lifestyle. In the United States, for example, 39% of the population lives in coastal counties.

A Columbia University report takes a global look at this trend by identifying major disaster hot spots: the east coast of North America, Bangladesh, the Philippines, the east coast of China. These hurricane-prone coastlines, with their dense population centers, hold enormous potential for economic loss and loss of life.

To make matters worse, the oceans have gotten steadily warmer over the last few decades, adding potency to the hurricane’s fuel. Sea levels are expected to rise by as much as a meter by the end of the century, increasing the risks of storm surge.

As more people pack the coastlines, man and nature are in the midst of an excrutiating head-on collision. Hurricane Ike slammed into Galveston in 2008. The cost in 2010 dollars: 28 billion. Andrew hit Miami in 1992. 45 billion. Sandy swept into New Jersey in 2012. 60 billion. Katrina in New Orleans: 106 billion. Not to mention the loss of thousands of lives.

Global Climate Change
Environment Ethics
Environment Justice

StormCloudsGathering

storm-cloudsWho or what is
StormCloudsGathering?
It depends on how you look at it
StormCloudsGathering is either a family, an individual, an idea, a project or a combination of thereof. We are a father, a mother and two kids. Mixed nationality. Mixed language. Hybrid Culture.

No we’re not Russian or Chinese.

We’ve never been to Russia or China. I wouldn’t mind visiting some day if the opportunity presented itself, but we would never voluntarily live somewhere that cold.

…(read more).

See also:

Global Climate Change
Environment Ethics
Environment Justice

EMERGENCY REPORT – 2nd TPP Sneak Attack Coming This Tuesday

TPP – Second Sneak Attack Scheduled Tuesday!

You may have heard about the failed attempt to pass “Fast Track” authority for the TPP in the House on Friday, June 12th. The public applied pressure and they backed down. You may have assumed that we would have a few months of breathing room before they made another attempt. However it turns out that Congress isn’t even going to wait a full week for round two.

According to senator Jeff Sessions, there is upcoming vote on Tuesday June 17th, for a bill called the TAA. Hidden in the TAA is a provision which would grant the president fast-track authority on any and all trade agreements for a period of six years. This would inherently include the TPP, TTIP and TISA.

If you don’t know what the TPP ir the TTIP are or why they are so dangerous, watch “The TPP What You’re Not Being Told”.

Global Climate Change
Environment Ethics
Environment Justice

Permaculture Project Log – #1


StormCloudsGathering

Published on Oct 1, 2015

Global Climate Change
Environment Ethics
Environment Justice

StormCloudsGathering is Under Attack – Major Changes Coming


StormCloudsGathering

Published on Sep 23, 2015

Global Climate Change
Environment Ethics
Environment Justice

Get Lessig in the Debates

Lessig2016

Published on Sep 2, 2015

Watch this video to see why we NEED Larry Lessig in the debates.

Global Climate Change
Environment Ethics
Environment Justice

Birth of the Moon


SpaceRip

Uploaded on Feb 11, 2012

Scientists have been reconstructing the history of the moon by scouring its surface, mapping its mountains and craters, and probing its interior. What are they learning about our own planet’s beginnings?

Decades ago, we sent astronauts to the moon as a symbol of confidence in the face of the great cold war struggle. Landing on the moon was a giant leap for mankind. But it’s what the astronauts picked up from the lunar surface that may turn out to be Apollo’s greatest legacy.

When the astronauts of Apollo stepped out of their landing craft, they entered a world draped in fine sticky dust, strewn with rocks, and pocked with craters. They walked and rambled about, picking up rocks that they packed for the return flight.

Back in earth-bound labs, scientists went to work probing the rocks for clues to one of the most vexing questions in all of science. Where did the moon come from? The answer promised to shed light on an even grander question. Where did Earth come from? And how did it evolve into the planet we know today?

The nature of the moon began to come into focus four centuries ago. Galileo Galilei had heard of an instrument built by Dutch opticians capable of “seeing faraway things as though nearby.” Galileo, in many ways the first modern scientist, saw this new instrument as a tool to help settle a long standing question.

What was the nature of the heavens, and how did the world of men fit within it?

To some philosophers, the moon was a perfect, crystalline sphere of divine substance, free of Earth’s imperfections. Galileo, with his telescope, saw a more familiar reality. He noted mountains and valleys on the moon, features like those of Earth.

The astronauts of Apollo lifted off on a series of missions to get a close up look at the moon and perhaps settle the debate. Because there’s no atmosphere there, the astronauts entered landscapes that are nearly frozen in time. They could scour the lunar surface for evidence of events going back almost to the time of its birth.

Indeed, eons of impacts had opened up the Moon’s interior, leaving a wealth of information strewn about their landing sites. Scientists had already noticed that some large old craters were surrounded by concentric rings. You can see one of the most pronounced examples in this image of the Mare Orientale, captured recently by NASA’s Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter, or LRO. The colors show differences in elevation.

The old view was that the impact had melted the rock below. A newer view held that the impactor had actually splashed down on a molten surface. That gave rise to the radical notion that, early in its history, the moon’s surface was covered in a vast ocean of magma.

When the astronauts arrived, they found relatively light rocks known as anorthosites. Their presence suggested that heavier material had sunk toward the moon’s interior, forcing lighter material to the surface.

The rocks they brought back were found to be strikingly similar to those on Earth, in part because they share forms of oxygen, called isotopes, that scientists regard as “blood types” for solar system bodies. Then there was this. The moon appeared to be completely, utterly, dry, with no evidence that water was ever present on its surface.

Global Climate Change
Environment Ethics
Environment Justice

Weather Channel Killer Earth Series Hurricanes


marc smith

Published on Aug 2, 2014

Natural disasters can be more powerful and destructive than all other forces on the planet. Throughout human history, hurricanes, earthquakes, tsunamis and other devastating catastrophes have threatened to wipe out civilizations around the world. Serial Killer Earth brings together a leading team of experts to analyze gripping video footage and eyewitness testimony. Their goal is to determine what caused today’s natural disasters and how they stack up against the worst of all time.

Global Climate Change
Environment Ethics
Environment Justice