Daily Archives: September 16, 2015

Exxon’s Own Research Confirmed Fossil Fuels’ Role in Global Warming Decades Ago

Exxon’s Richard Werthamer (right) and Edward Garvey (left) are aboard the company’s Esso Atlantic tanker working on a project to measure the carbon dioxide levels in the ocean and atmosphere. The project ran from 1979 to 1982. (Credit: Richard Werthamer)

Top executives were warned of possible catastrophe from greenhouse effect, then led efforts to block solutions.

By Neela Banerjee, Lisa Song and David Hasemyer

Sep 16, 2015

Exxon’s Richard Werthamer (right) and Edward Garvey (left) are aboard the company’s Esso Atlantic tanker working on a project to measure the carbon dioxide levels in the ocean and atmosphere. The project ran from 1979 to 1982. (Credit: Richard Werthamer)

At a meeting in Exxon Corporation’s headquarters, a senior company scientist named James F. Black addressed an audience of powerful oilmen. Speaking without a text as he flipped through detailed slides, Black delivered a sobering message: carbon dioxide from the world’s use of fossil fuels would warm the planet and could eventually endanger

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What Will Happen At the Paris Climate Conference? | Renat Heuberger

Posted: 09/16/2015 11:17 am EDT Updated: 09/16/2015 11:17 am EDT

Will Paris be a success? Will the agreement at CoP21 ensure global temperature raise stays within the 2° limit? What are the concrete consequences of Paris for my company?

As the CEO of the South Pole Group, a global sustainability solutions provider, I am debating such questions with stakeholders from both the public and private sectors on a daily basis. COP21, the next UN climate summit in Paris, is only a few months away. Therefore, we have decided to roll out our big crystal ball and present you our 10 key outcomes you should (and should not) expect from Paris.

In a nutshell:

  • Mitigation commitments by industrialised and developing countries won’t come as binding targets. Rather, countries will pledge so-called Intended Nationally Determined Contributions (INDCs), to be implemented by 2020.
  • These pledges per se, also due to their non-binding nature, will fall way short of keeping the climate within the 2° target.
  • Much more promising is concrete climate action unfolding in individual countries, as well as private sector commitments.
  • In addition, the conference in Paris will provide a deal on Climate Finance contributions by developed countries (e.g. through Green Climate Fund) beyond 2020, as well as an Agreement on Adaptation to climate change and loss & damage.
  • Paris is not the end, but only the start to get us #readyfor2020..

Top 10 outcomes of COP21 Paris:

  1. There will be a deal in Paris, but it will be weak. Last year’s negotiations in Lima, Peru, already suggested this course: the Intended Nationally Determined Contributions (INDCs) were defined as new commitments under the 2020 agreement in a rather vague and lethargic, largely non-binding and non-enforceable manner.
  2. The Paris deal is just the tip of the iceberg for the growing global climate movement. National, regional and local initiatives are strongly gaining momentum, paving the way for real change. Therefore, in spite of noise created around Paris, what really matters is what’s happening in individual countries around the world. The current climate actions are a bottom-up process. Paris is thus rather a reflection of various forces pulling towards more climate action and will serve a catalyst to reinforce what is going on below the surface. Pioneering countries will mobilise on Nationally Appropriate Mitigation Actions as a means to transform their economic sector. By promoting low carbon technologies and forward-looking solutions they will reduce their national GHG footprint while achieving sustainable development goals. A win-win.
  3. The pressure to act on private level will come from many sides: For the finance industry, the divestment movement and portfolio climate transparency are key drivers. Consumer goods industry increasingly commit to Deforestation Free Supply Chains, a growing number of leading corporates commits to 100% Renewable Energy and to Carbon Neutrality. The push to move will be felt by everyone, private and public, regardless of the outcomes in Paris.
  4. Positive actions and investments will continue independent of COP21, simply because they make economic sense. Continued actions will take place at the national level (e.g. US power plant regulation, China’s emission intensity target, the EU ETS), at the local level (e.g. city commitments to reduce 1GtCO2 per 2020) and within businesses. These positive actions will continue, no matter what happens in Paris, because they have sustainable development benefits on their own (growth, jobs, clean air, energy independence).
  5. Public climate finance is expected to increase steadily towards 2020 and beyond particularly through the launch of the Green Climate Fund (GCF). The operationalisation and scale-up of the Green Climate Fund (GCF) to desirable levels will still take years. However, the GCF is under immense pressure to disburse funds quickly in the short term. This offers an opportunity for active market participants to help shape how it operates. The GCF represents a great source of funding for innovative business ventures.
  6. The vast majority of finance will still be coming from private and domestic sources, and will be mostly be invested because of reasons other than climate change. Most of the money invested in mitigation actions will be from domestic capital markets, including in emerging countries: 75% of current climate finance is invested in the country of origin. This is basic low carbon financing: It will benefit competitiveness and has co-benefits far beyond low carbon. Smart organisations will make sure not to miss opportunities such as the one we identified and capitalised for the cement sector in Vietnam.

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Documentary Frontline – The Trillion-Dollar Conspiracy_ 9_11 Mounting Evidence


Documentary Films

Published on Dec 23, 2014

Documentary Frontline – The Trillion-Dollar Conspiracy_ 9_11 Mounting Evidence [HD] – http://youtu.be/rJn7lcyV7VY

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Exxon and climate change

Reporter Neela Banerjee on  FRONTLINE PBS | Official

Published on Sep 15, 2015

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Reporter Neela Banerjee discusses the findings of an InsideClimate News investigation into Exxon’s early research on climate change.

Former Exxon scientist Ed Garvey speaks about his early research for the company on climate change in this interview conducted in collaboration with InsideClimate News.

Former Exxon scientist Richard Werthamer discusses the company’s early research on climate change in this interview conducted in collaboration with InsideClimate News.

Video interviews produced by Tom Jennings.

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National Day of Protest Against Environmental Destruction

The Eco-Logic Channel

Published on Feb 19, 2013

National Day of Protest Against Environmental Destruction, Los Angeles 2.17.13

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Canada: Intellectuals Call for Climate Action with “Leap Manifesto”

Meanwhile, in Canada, a group of more than 100 leading activists, writers and musicians have released a wide-ranging call for economic and environmental change to address “the deepest crisis in recent memory” – climate change. The Leap Manifesto calls for respecting the rights of indigenous communities, implementing a universal program to build energy-efficient homes, ending fossil fuel subsidies and cutting military spending. Signatories include musicians Neil Young, Leonard Cohen, Tegan and Sara, and Alanis Morissette; actors Ellen Page, Rachel McAdams and Donald Sutherland, and many more. Naomi Klein, author of “This Changes Everything: Capitalism vs. the Climate,” unveiled the manifesto on Tuesday.

Naomi Klein: “All share the belief that it is possible for Canada to fight against climate change in a way that changes our country for the better, by delivering meaningful justice to First Nations, creating more and better jobs for the people who need them most, restoring and expanding our social safety net, and welcoming far more migrants and refugees. In short, we can and must care for one another and for the climate.”

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Coalition Demands End to New Fossil Fuel Leases on Public Lands

The deadly extreme weather comes as a coalition of more than 400 organizations have called on the White House to stop issuing new fossil fuel leases on public lands and oceans. Among the call’s signatories are climate activist Tim DeChristopher, renowned environmentalist Bill McKibben, indigenous activist Winona LaDuke and environmental lawyer Robert F. Kennedy Jr. A number of labor, faith and environmental groups also joined the call, including the United Auto Workers Union, Unitarian Universalist Association, Physicians for Social Responsibility, the Indigenous Environmental Network and 350.org. More than 67 million acres of public land and ocean are already leased to the fossil fuel industry. The coalition says that declaring unleased oil, gas and coal on public lands as “unburnable” would accomplish more in the global fight against climate change than any other single action taken by the Obama administration.

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