Daily Archives: August 26, 2015

Arctic Draws International Competition for Oil


VOA News

Published on Aug 26, 2015

A new geopolitical “Great Game” is under way in earth’s northernmost region, the Arctic, where Russia has claimed a large area for resource development and President Barack Obama recently approved Shell Oil Company’s test-drilling project in an area under U.S. control. As VOA’s Greg Flakus reports from Houston, energy is a big part, but not the only part, of the North Pole prize.
Originally published at – http://www.voanews.com/media/video/ar…

Global Climate Change
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North Dakota first state to let police arm drones with tear gas, Tasers


RT America

Published on Aug 26, 2015

A new law is allowing North Dakota police departments to use drones equipped with Tasers, tear gas and other “non-lethal” weapons. Alexey Yaroshevsky takes a look at the controversy.

Global Climate Change
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Blacks, whites split in New Orleans over recovery after Hurricane Katrina


RT America

Published on Aug 26, 2015

A new survey conducted on residents in Louisiana found that 80 percent of white residents believe that New Orleans has “mostly recovered”’ from the devastation of Hurricane Katrina, compared to only 40 percent of African-Americans who believe a recovery has been achieved. Simone Del Rosario is down in New Orleans with the details.

Global Climate Change
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For Pope Francis’s D.C. visit, environmental rally of up to 200K planned

WP-pope

Environmental activists carry a banner June 18 as they march toward a Roman Catholic church to coincide with Pope Francis’s encyclical on climate change in Manila, Philippines. In a high-level, 190-page document, Francis describes ongoing human damage to nature as “one small sign of the ethical, cultural and spiritual crisis of modernity.” The solution, he says, will require self-sacrifice and a “bold cultural revolution” worldwide. (Bullit Marquez/AP)

Several environmental groups are planning a major climate rally that will draw hundreds of thousands to the National Mall on Sept. 24, the day Pope Francis speaks to Congress and is expected to address the public afterwards.

The permit for the gathering — which will make the moral case for reducing greenhouse gas emissions linked to global warming — is for 200,000 people. The Moral Action on Climate Network, along with the Earth Day Network, League of Conservation Voters, Sierra Club and other groups, have timed the rally on the Mall the same day of the pope’s speech. House Speaker John Boehner (R-Ohio) has said the pope “has expressed an interest” in making an appearance on the Capitol’s West Front.

While there has been no official confirmation of formal remarks, Francis is known for making impromptu changes to his itineraries. Federal officials have indicated that the pope is likely to speak for a few minutes to those gathered before the Capitol.

(read more).

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We Asked Joseph Nye: What Should Be the Purpose of American Power?

“Military force will remain a crucial component of American power, but it is not sufficient.”

August 20, 2015 Joseph S. Nye Jr

Editor’s Note: The following is part of TNI’s special 30th anniversary symposium. We asked twenty-five of the world’s leading experts: What is the purpose of American power? You can find all of their answers here. You can also find our exclusive interview with Henry Kissinger here.

Since World War II, the United States has led, albeit imperfectly, in the production of global public goods such as a balance of military power, international monetary stability, an open trading system and freedom of navigation. That leadership should continue to be a central purpose of our foreign policy, because if the strongest country does not produce public goods, we and others will suffer from their absence.

Americans go through cycles of belief that we are in decline. While the United States has many problems (nothing new there), it is not in absolute decline like ancient Rome, which had no productivity growth. Because of immigration, we are the only major developed country that will not suffer a demographic decline by midcentury; our dependence on energy imports is diminishing rather than increasing; we are at the forefront of the major technologies that will shape this century; and our universities dominate the world rankings. We have more allies and connections than any other country.

The real challenge we face could be called “the rise of the rest.” Even though the growth in emerging markets is unlikely to produce a single challenger that will overtake the United States, the “rise of the rest” creates a more complex world. The problem of leadership in such a world is how to get everyone into the act and still get action.

Military force will remain a crucial component of American power, but it is not sufficient. An American strategy that holds the military balance in Europe or East Asia while maintaining alliances is a crucial source of influence, but trying to occupy and control the internal politics of nationalistic populations in the Middle East revolutions is futile. We cannot turn our back on the region because of our interests in Israel, nonproliferation and human rights, among others. But our policy should be one of containing, balancing, nudging and influencing from the sidelines rather than an occupation that would be counterproductive. In contrast, the internal balance of power makes us welcome in Europe and Asia. Russia’s invasion of Ukraine has revived NATO, and the rise of China creates concern in India, Japan, Vietnam, the Philippines and other countries. We do not need a policy of containment of China. “Integrate but hedge” remains valid. The only country that can contain China is China, and as it presses its territorial conflicts with neighbors, China contains itself.

…(read more).

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A Conversation with U.S. Secretary of Defense Ashton Carter | Foreign Affairs

Ashton Carter has an unusual background for a secretary of defense. Before assuming the United States’ top military post in February, he studied medieval history and particle physics as an undergraduate at Yale, got a Ph.D. in physics as a Rhodes scholar at Oxford, and taught international affairs at Harvard. He also served as an assistant secretary of defense in the Clinton administration and as an undersecretary and then the deputy secretary of defense under President Barack Obama. Since becoming secretary, Carter has displayed an unusual bluntness, openly criticizing Iraq’s military forces and talking tough to adversaries such as China and Russia. In his first full-length print interview since becoming secretary, Carter met with Foreign Affairs managing editor Jonathan Tepperman in his Pentagon office in early July.

…(read more).

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A TNI Symposium: What Should Be the Purpose of American Power?

The National Interest has gathered an all-star cast to answer a timeless question.

Jacob Heilbrunn August 19, 2015 September-October 2015

Editor’s Note: The following is a TNI special 30th anniversary symposium. We asked twenty-five of the world’s leading experts: What is the purpose of American power? Each day we will post multiple responses to this important question. Please check back daily. Below you will find a schedule of when each response will be posted (and a link when live):

Wednesday, August 19: Graham Allison, Tom Cotton, Les Gelb, Grover Norquist and Anne-Marie Slaughter.

Thursday, August 20: Ian Bremmer, Paul Kennedy and Joseph Nye.

Friday, August 21: John Mearsheimer, Ruth Wedgwood and Robert Zoellick.

Monday, August 24: William J. Burns, Gideon Rose and Paul Saunders.

Tuesday, August 25: Paula J. Dobriansky, Yoichi Funabashi and Robert W. Merry.

Wednesday, August 26: David Bromwich, Gary Hart and Zalmay Khalilzad.

Thursday, August 27: Michael Lind, Kishore Mahbubani, Ferdinand Mount, Paul Pillar and Gideon Rachman.

What Is America’s Purpose?

Several decades after the end of the Cold War, the United States is confronting an increasingly unstable world in which its preeminence is facing new challenges. What, if anything, should be the purpose of American power?

In 1989, a recent college graduate interviewed for a job with National Interest editor Owen Harries. Harries, the former Australian ambassador to UNESCO, asked whether he sympathized more with the neoconservative or realist approach to foreign affairs. After a short pause, the candidate boldly split the difference, observing that it was wise to set limits on intervention abroad, but that it was also the case that, as Norman Podhoretz had recently observed in Survey, it was imperative to elicit a certain amount of nationalism among the American public to rouse it to action.

(read more).

Global Climate Change
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