Daily Archives: March 24, 2015

The Market as God

Market-as-godby Harvey Cox

A FEW years ago a friend advised me that if I wanted to know what was going on in the real world, I should read the business pages. Although my lifelong interest has been in the study of religion, I am always willing to expand my horizons; so I took the advice, vaguely fearful that I would have to cope with a new and baffling vocabulary. Instead I was surprised to discover that most of the concepts I ran across were quite familiar.

Expecting a terra incognita, I found myself instead in the land of déjà vu. The lexicon of The Wall Street Journal and the business sections of Time and Newsweek turned out to bear a striking resemblance to Genesis, the Epistle to the Romans, and Saint Augustine’s City of God. Behind descriptions of market reforms, monetary policy, and the convolutions of the Dow, I gradually made out the pieces of a grand narrative about the inner meaning of human history, why things had gone wrong, and how to put them right. Theologians call these myths of origin, legends of the fall, and doctrines of sin and redemption. But here they were again, and in only thin disguise: chronicles about the creation of wealth, the seductive temptations of statism, captivity to faceless economic cycles, and, ultimately, salvation through the advent of free markets, with a small dose of ascetic belt tightening along the way, especially for the East Asian economies.

…(read more).

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Making Money While Making a Difference: Is it Really that Easy? | Harvard Thinks Green


Harvard University

Uploaded on Dec 14, 2011

Professor Rebecca Henderson from Harvard Business School is the Co-Director of their Business and Environment Initiative and recently named the John and Natty McArthur University Professor

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Tapping the Power of Markets to Protect the Environment | Harvard Thinks Green 2012


Harvard University

Published on Sep 27, 2012

Former Obama advisor and Assistant Professor of Public Policy at the Harvard Kennedy School Joseph Aldy
Joe Aldy is an Assistant Professor at the Harvard Kennedy School, a Nonresident Fellow at Resources for the Future, and a Faculty Research Fellow at the National Bureau of Economic Research. His research focuses on climate change policy, energy policy, and mortality risk valuation. In 2009-2010, he served as the Special Assistant to the President for Energy and Environment reporting through the National Economic Council and the Office of Energy and Climate Change at the White House. Aldy previously served as a Fellow at Resources for the Future and worked on the staff of the President’s Council of Economic Advisers. He served as the Co-Director of the Harvard Project on International Climate Agreements and Co-Director of the International Energy Workshop before joining the Obama Administration. He earned his doctorate in economics from Harvard University a masters of environmental management degree from the Nicholas School of the Environment, and a bachelors degree from Duke University.

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Introduction | Harvard Thinks Green 2012


Harvard University

Published on Sep 27, 2012

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US Supply Chain Tainted by Slave-Caught Fis


Associated Press

Published on Mar 24, 2015

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A year-long investigation by the Associated Press has found that seafood caught by slaves in Indonesia is sent to Thailand, where the fish can wind up in the supply chains of Wal-mart, Kroger, Albertsons, and Safeway. (March 24)

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Turn Down the Heat: Why a 4°C Warmer World Must be Avoided

The World Bank | Coursera

It is now clear that without action on climate change, the world may become 4°C warmer by the end of this century. Such an increase would threaten to roll back decades of development progress; thus, we are at a ‘make it or break it’ point in time. This course presents the most recent scientific evidence, as well as some of the opportunities for urgent action.

About the Course

Under current pledges and commitments, the world is likely to reach 4°C degree warming by the end of the century and 2°C warming as early as 2040. This MOOC brings together renowned scientists and policymakers to provide a synthesis of the most recent evidence and presents an analysis of likely impacts and risks, with a focus on developing countries. It chronicles already observed changes in the climate system and their impacts, through the increase in carbon dioxide emissions, corresponding temperature increases and melting of glaciers and sea ice, and changes in precipitation patterns. This course also offers projections for the 21st century for droughts, heat waves and sea-level rise in different parts of the world, with implications for food and water security, as well as possible impacts on agriculture, water availability, ecosystems and human health.

This MOOC presents an analysis of the likely impacts of a 4°C warming trajectory and stresses the need for decision makers and communities to take a serious look at their adaptation choices, while also signaling the urgency for mitigation action. Participants will also be introduced to the risks of triggering non-linearity, and tipping elements, such as the disintegration of the West Antarctic ice sheet and large-scale Amazon dieback. The course includes a discussion of the main policy choices needed to prevent warming above 2°C and ends with an assessment of climate risks to development across six geographic regions.

…(read more).

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Target: Climate change | Harvard Gazette | Divest Harvard

Presidential panel to discuss wide-ranging concerns at Sanders Theatre on April 13

13-April-Invitation

March 24, 2015 | Editor’s Pick Popular

Experts from the worlds of science, government, economics, business, and history will gather in Sanders Theatre on April 13 at 4 p.m. for a wide-ranging panel discussion on how society in general and universities in particular can best confront the perils posed by climate change, Harvard President Drew Faust announced today.

The discussion, to be introduced by Faust and moderated by Charlie Rose of CBS and PBS, will bring together President Barack Obama’s principal science adviser, the co-chair of a major international climate change group, and five leading scholars prominent in seeking solutions to climate change.

“As a scientific consensus has firmly established, climate change presents one of the world’s most urgent and demanding challenges. All of us share an interest and responsibility in confronting that reality and pursuing effective solutions,” said Faust, who on March 17 delivered an address on climate change at Tsinghua University in Beijing.

“I am pleased we will have the benefit of such a distinguished group of panelists to elevate attention to the need for action and to spur us all to focus even more intently on how society and universities, in particular, can rise to the challenge,” Faust added. “We have an extraordinary range of efforts already underway across Harvard, and the magnitude and complexity of the problem demand that we do even more.”

Panelists are expected to include:

  • Joseph Aldy, assistant professor of public policy, Harvard Kennedy School; former special assistant to the president for energy and environment, the White House.
  • Christopher Field, co-chair, Working Group II of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change; founding director, Department of Global Ecology, Carnegie Institution for Science; Lane Professor for Interdisciplinary Environmental Studies, Stanford University; member, Harvard University Board of Overseers; Harvard ’75.
  • Rebecca Henderson. McArthur University Professor, Harvard University; co-director, Business and Environment Initiative, Harvard Business School.
  • John Holdren, assistant to the president for science and technology, the White House; co-chair, President’s Council of Advisors on Science and Technology; former Heinz Professor of Environmental Policy, Harvard Kennedy School; former professor of environmental science and public policy, Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences, Harvard University.
  • Richard Newell, Gendell Professor of Energy and Environmental Economics, Duke University; director, Duke University Energy Initiative; former administrator, U.S. Energy Information Administration; former senior economist for energy and environment, President’s Council of Economic Advisers; Harvard Ph.D. ’97.
  • Naomi Oreskes, professor of the history of science and director of graduate studies, Department of the History of Science, Harvard University; co-author of “Merchants of Doubt: How a Handful of Scientists Obscured the Truth on Issues from Tobacco Smoke to Global Warming.”
  • Daniel Schrag, Sturgis Hooper Professor of Geology, professor of environmental science and engineering, and director of the Harvard University Center for the Environment, Harvard University.

In recent years, the University has substantially broadened and deepened its research and educational programs focused on climate change and on energy and the environment. Most recently, the University announced the first recipients of grants from the President’s Climate Change Solutions Fund, intended to catalyze a new generation of efforts to accelerate the transition to renewable sources of energy.

…(read more).

Please click HERE to request a ticket for the event.

For background information see 25 February Crimson article:

Faust-panel

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Young Voices for the Planet | Youth Solutions to the Global Warming Crisis

KIDS! LET YOUR VOICES BE HEARD!

The Young Voices for the Planet movies allow your young voices to be heard. Seeing what other young people have done and are doing will inspire you to action! Say Yes to Action! Say No to Fear.

The YOUNG VOICES FOR THE PLANET FILMS ARE ABOUT YOU!

The Young Voices for the Planet films feature other youth your age who care about the Earth and are taking action. Watch the movies and see what other young people are doing. We hope the films will inspire you to action. Your voices COUNT! You can make a difference!

Founder and Director

Author and Illustrator, Lynne Cherry, originator, producer and director of the Young Voices for the Planet films, is well-known for her popular children’s books especially her rain forest classic, The Great Kapok Tree and her environmental history A River Ran Wild.

Young Voices for the Planet is a project of Young Voices on Climate Change, a 501 (c) (3) tax deductible organization.

http://www.youngvoicesonclimatechange.com/

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Young Voices for the Planet


Link TV

Published on Mar 21, 2014

Find more Earth Focus content at https://www.linktv.org/earthfocus
(Earth Focus: Episode 61) This episode features author and illustrator Lynne Cherry on “Young Voices for the Planet,” her film series about young people making positive environmental change. Featured films include Plant for the Planet, the story of a nine year old boy from Germany who helped plant more than a billion trees around the world; Dreaming in Green which documents how Florida middle school students were able to save more than $53,000 through environmentally conscious actions; Olivia’s Birds and the Oil Spill, which depicts how an 11 year old girl with a love for birds was able to raise more than $200,000 for bird rescue efforts after the BP oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico, and Longing for a Local Lunch, the story of how students in a Massachusetts high school were able to change their cafeteria fare from processed to locally grown food. Lynne Cherry is well known for her popular children’s books especially for the rainforest classic The Great Kapok Tree and her environmental history A River Ran Wild. To learn more about Lynne Cherry, visit www.lynnecherry.com.

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Turning Earth into Mars?


Link TV

Published on Jun 13, 2014

Find more Earth Focus content at https://www.linktv.org/earthfocus
“We are Marsifying Earth,” says distinguished marine Biologist Dr. Sylvia Earle. “We are increasing the amount of carbon dioxide in our atmosphere… We are undermining the integrity of systems that yield what we need to live. What is more important than that? Our economy, our health, our security, or being alive? It starts with being alive.” Dr. Earle explains why the ocean is a life support system for the planet — but its becoming more acidic. “Most of the oxygen that we breathe comes from the ocean,” she says. “So we should take care of it as if our lives depend on it.”

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