Daily Archives: March 23, 2015

Religion and a new environmental ethic


Yale University

Uploaded on Jan 13, 2009

John Grim and Mary Evelyn Tucker, Co-Directors of the Yale University Forum on Religion and Ecology, discuss their view that there is a new relationship between religion and the environment. This new religious consciousness considers the natural world sacred.

Global Climate Change
Environment Ethics
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Emerging Earth Community

John Grim and Mary Evelyn Tucker

Co-Directors of the Forum on Religion and Ecology at Yale, together organized a series of ten conferences on World Religions and Ecology and edited the ten volume series from the conferences distributed by Harvard University Press. They now teach in the joint degree program in religion and ecology at Yale University.

Global Climate Change
Environment Ethics
Environment Justice

UU Young Adults for Climate Justice | UU Ministry for Earth

The Unitarian Universalist Young Adults for Climate Justice is a network that was formed in 2012.

Our mission is to grow a diverse network of Unitarian Universalist young adult activists grounded in faith, supported by each other and the UU community at large, and working together for climate justice.

Our vision is that our individual and collective actions catalyze the movement for a socially just, resilient, and sustainable future.

To join the UU Young Adults for Climate Justice Network, please fill out this form.

As a part of the Commit2Respond initiative, we are launching our first campaign: A commitment to deliver ONE HUNDRED worship services about climate justice, involving young adult leadership, to faith congregations. There is no set time frame for this commitment, though ideally we will accomplish it by 2017. This will be a growing experience for our network, and we invite you to find out more information, and participate in this campaign.

You can follow us on uuyacj

…(read more).

Global Climate Change
Environment Ethics
Environment Justice

GROW Climate Justice: Grounded & Resilient Organizers’ Workshop

GROW Climate Justice, the Grounded & Resilient Organizers’ Workshop, is an intensive five-day training on spiritually grounded climate justice activism for young adults.  The workshop will be happening August 7-11th, 2015 at the Cenacle Retreat Center in Chicago.  The primary intention of this effort is to give young activists some of the skills, practices, and relationships that will help them do the work of climate justice for the next 50 years.  We as a society have already committed to a level of climate crisis that will shape the lifetime of our young people.  We as people of principle must commit to also giving young people the resources they need to be resilient for that long struggle.

As part of the Commit2Respond initiative, GROW Climate Justice is organized by the Unitarian Universalist College of Social Justice.  The main coordinator behind this training is Tim DeChristopher, a UU student at Harvard Divinity School who founded the climate justice group Peaceful Uprising.  Tim has been a leader in the climate movement since his 2008 act of civil disobedience that blocked the sale of mineral rights to the oil industry on public land in Utah.

The GROW training is designed to help organizers advance their skills for effective strategy and tactics, as well as provide the support to grapple with the emotional and spiritual challenge of “fighting for love in the age of extinction.”  This workshop will include tried and true training practices, but we also have faith in the power of  bringing passionate people together with incredible leaders and giving them the time to deeply connect.  In addition to Tim, we have assembled an amazing list of trainers and facilitators with a wide range of skills and insight.

…(read more).

Global Climate Change
Environment Ethics
Environment Justice

Ebola Toll in West Africa Tops 10,000 on Outbreak’s 1st Anniversary

The record outbreak of Ebola in West Africa has marked its first anniversary, with more than 10,000 people dead. Liberia announced its first confirmed case of Ebola in weeks Friday, quashing hopes the country had eliminated the virus. Guinea and Sierra Leone have continued to report about 100 to 200 new cases combined each week. Guinea recently reported a doubling of cases over the course of a month, with three doctors among those falling ill. Sierra Leone, meanwhile, has announced plans for a two-day quarantine this week, when nearly the entire country will be told to remain indoors. Reflecting on the anniversary of the outbreak, the group Doctors Without Borders criticized the slow international response, saying: “For the Ebola outbreak to spiral this far out of control required many institutions to fail. And they did, with tragic and avoidable consequences.”

Global Climate Change
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RIP Danny Schechter: Media Pioneer Who Covered Apartheid South Africa, Occupy & Kissinger


democracynow

Published on Mar 23, 2015

http://democracynow.org – We speak with two close colleagues and friends of the pioneering author, filmmaker and media reform activist Danny Schechter, who died last week of pancreatic cancer at the age of 72, and play excerpts from different points in his career. In one interview, Schechter explains how he got his start as “The News Dissector” on Boston’s WBCN radio in the 1970 and garnered fans such as Noam Chomsky. Schechter went on to work as a television producer at ABC’s 20/20, where he won two Emmy Awards, and at the newly launched CNN. He wrote 12 books, including “The More You Watch, the Less You Know.”

He was also a leading activist and journalist against apartheid in South Africa, who left the corporate journalist world to make six documentaries about Nelson Mandela and produce the groundbreaking television series “South Africa Now,” which aired on 150 public television stations in the late 1980s and early 1990s at the height of the anti-apartheid struggle. We broadcast exclusive excerpts from the show, which has been newly digitized by Yale University, and speak with South African filmmaker Anant Singh, who worked with Schechter on the feature film “Mandela: Long Walk Home”; and Rory O’Connor, who co-founded Globalvision with Schechter and worked with him for decades.

Global Climate Change
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Media

On the River Nile, a Move to Avert a Conflict Over Water

William Lloyd-George/AFP/Getty Images
A short section of the Blue Nile was diverted in 2013 as part of the construction of the Grand Ethiopian Renaissance Dam.

12 Mar 2015: Report

Ethiopia’s plans to build Africa’s largest hydroelectric dam on the Nile have sparked tensions with Egypt, which depends on the river to irrigate its arid land. But after years of tensions, an international agreement to share the Nile’s waters may be in sight.

by Fred Pearce

For thousands of years, Egyptians have depended on the waters of the Nile flowing out of the Ethiopian highlands and central Africa. It is the world’s longest river, passing through 11 countries, but without its waters the most downstream of those nations, Egypt, is a barren desert. So when, in 2011, Ethiopia began to build a giant hydroelectric dam across the river’s largest tributary, the Blue Nile, it looked like Egypt might carry out its long-standing threat to go to war to protect its lifeline.

But last weekend, all appeared to change. Ministers from Egypt, Ethiopia, and Sudan agreed on the basis for a deal for managing the Grand Ethiopian Renaissance Dam, which would be the largest hydroelectric dam in Africa. So is peace about to break out on the River Nile? Longtime Nile observers are warning that a dispute that has lasted for a century may not end so easily.

Some 8,000 Ethiopian construction workers are currently at work building the Ethiopian dam at a site close to where the Blue Nile crosses into Sudan, before joining the White Nile and heading on to Egypt and the Mediterranean Sea. The scheme currently is about a third completed. Ethiopia says the dam is essential to its own economic development, while Egypt has called for construction to halt.

…(read more).

Global Climate Change
Environment Ethics
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Is Global Warming a Moral Issue?

Do we have a moral responsibility to protect the planet for future generations? Some people say “absolutely,” but many Americans do not yet see climate change as an ethical issue.

Steve Gardiner, a philosopher at the University of Washington, says part of the reason is that most of our emissions come from our desire for short-term convenience and inexpensive energy and food.

GARDINER: “But the full impact of those emissions is spread out over a very long period of time. And so many of the effects, and particularly the most severe, even catastrophic effects, are not to us now, but are in the future, and of course then on other people.”

This fact raises difficult questions about fairness and justice. So for some people, it is easier to ignore the ethics of climate change.

GARDINER: “If we were to continue to take our modest benefits now, and pass on the severe costs into the future, then one thing we might not like to do is draw attention to the fact that that’s what we’re doing. Cause looked at in that way, it seems morally indefensible.”

Gardiner says that to solve global warming, we need to understand and address it as an ethical problem — not just as a scientific, economic and political one.

Global Climate Change
Environment Ethics
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New Solutions For Dire California Drought

March 23, 2015 at 10:00 AM

California Governor Jerry Brown, and his billion-dollar emergency drought plan. We’ll look at dry California’s options, including turning to the sea.

More water woe in California this year. The most populous state in the Union, the biggest source of American veggies and much more, is entering its fourth year of drought. Parched reservoirs all over. The mountain snow pack almost gone. It’s at 12 percent of normal. Twelve percent! Last week, Governor Jerry Brown rolled out a billion-dollar plan to deal with the water crisis. But you can’t buy rain. Californians are beginning to get the message, but the message is potentially so tough it’s hard to take on board. This hour On Point: getting real about a dry, dry California.

Global Climate Change
Environment Ethics
Environment Justice

Robert Reich Demolishes Myth that College Is Gateway to the Middle Class

The suffering kids experience over college admissions is intense and largely unnecessary.

By Robert Reich / Robert Reich’s Blog
March 23, 2015
Photo Credit: via YouTube/Moyers & Company

I know a high school senior who’s so worried about whether she’ll be accepted at the college of her choice she can’t sleep.

The parent of another senior tells me he stands at the mailbox for an hour every day waiting for a hoped-for acceptance letter to arrive.

Parents are also uptight. I’ve heard of some who have stopped socializing with other parents of children competing for admission to the same university.

Competition for places in top-brand colleges is absurdly intense. With inequality at record levels and almost all the economic gains going to the top, there’s more pressure than ever to get the golden ring.

…(read more).

Global Climate Change
Environment Ethics
Environment Justice