Daily Archives: March 19, 2015

PERI: : Three Measures of Environmental Inequality

Three Measures of Environmental Inequality
James K. Boyce | Klara Zwickl | Michael Ash | 2/23/2015
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Abstract:
Using data on industrial air pollution exposure in the United States, we compute three measures of environmental inequality at the national level and for the 50 states: the Gini coefficient of exposure, the ratio of median exposure of people of color to that of non-Hispanic whites, and the ratio of median exposure of poor households to that of nonpoor households.

Comparing Gini coefficients of pollution exposure to those of income, we find that the distribution of pollution exposure is more unequal. Comparing the three measures of environmental inequality, we find that rankings across states vary considerably, and conclude that different measures are most appropriate depending on whether the policy concern is equal fulfillment of the intrinsic right to a clean and safe environment or interactions between environmental inequality and other socioeconomic disparities.

http://www.peri.umass.edu/236/hash/e52370c2756a4a300dbed71c039b6268/publication/648/

Global Climate Change
Environment Ethics
Environment Justice

Report: Environmental Inequality Disproportionality Affects Black and Latino Communities


TheRealNews  Published on Mar 18, 2015

UMass-Amherst Researcher Klara Zwickl discusses measuring environmental inequality through industrial air pollution in the U.S. and recommends solutions to bridge economic disparities

See:

Three Measures of Environmental Inequality

 

 

 

Global Climate Change
Environment Ethics
Environment Justice
Report

Keystone XL Pipeline = Less Jobs Than You Think


NextGen Climate

Published on Mar 18, 2015

It’s shocking how few jobs the Keystone XL pipeline would actually create.

Global Climate Change
Environment Ethics
Environment Justice

Food, agriculture and justice: Building a new rice future for people and the planet

Vietnamese farmer Hoang Thi Lien, 53 at her SRI (System of Rice Intensification) farm in Dong Phu commune, My Duc district, Ha Tay province. Lien is a core farmer that gives instruction for and help other farmers to cultivate SRI rice. Photo: Chau Doan/ Oxfam America

March 16, 2015 Posted by

The system of rice intensification doesn’t just help small-scale farmers experiment with new methods, but also gives people greater confidence in public spaces.

Minh Le is the Global Agriculture Advisor at Oxfam and is based in Vietnam.

One of my favorite things is to stroll through paddy fields as they shine yellow and gold, taking in the timeless picture. White storks also walk along the irrigation canals, which reflect the sunlight like mirrors. When the first drops of rain come, you see farmers planting seedlings in the muddy soil and then, a few months later, loading sacks full of grains for home consumption or selling to traders.

A staple, the world over

Rice cultivation is deeply rooted in the minds and lives of billions of people – not just mine. Half of the world’s people get sustenance from rice. One billion people are engaged in growing rice. It is ironic, however, that nearly three fourths of the 805 million children, women, and men who are undernourished live in Asia – where rice production is in surplus and where the Green Revolution has been embraced since the 20th century.

The 2008 food price crisis triggered renewed investment in agriculture around the world. However, these investments have been heavily focused on increasing production rather than on achieving more sustainable, affordable, and diversified food production in rural areas.

Small farmers’ struggle

More and more, small-scale farmers are being left behind by agricultural advances. They struggle to cope with the rising costs of fuel, fertilizers, and pesticides, as well as the increasing competition for land. This is particularly true for small-scale producers of rice, an important crop for food security, national economies, and ecological systems.

Compounding these challenges, a decline in rice yields in major Asian rice-producing countries due to weather unpredictability and disasters may be on the horizon, as the 5th Assessment Report by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change warns. Smallholder farmers are most affected by climate change, but they rarely have a voice in setting rice policies as rice suppliers and traders resist reforms that would eat into their profits.

…(read more).

Food-Matters
Global Climate Change
Environment Ethics
Environment Justice

The Story of Agriculture and the Green Economy


FarmingFirst

Uploaded on Sep 23, 2011

www.farmingfirst.org

The future of our world depends on addressing global challenges now. We need to create sustainable livelihoods, feed a growing population and safeguard the environment. We need to make the global economy green.

Food-Matters
Global Climate Change
Environment Ethics
Environment Justice

Food Policy Networks – Projects – Center for a Livable Future

Within our portfolio of public health and food system work, the Center has an established track record of respected research and program activities on local and state food policy, food environments, food access, farmers markets, urban agriculture and community food security. Joining our team as a Senior Advisor is Mark Winne, a noted expert and leading food system policy advocate with over 40 years of community food system and policy experience. As former food policy council program director for the Community Food Security Coalition, Mark brings his experience and expertise as an important new asset that has strengthened the Center’s capacity.

CLF’s Food Policy Networks (FPN) project supports the development of effective and robust food policy at the state and local levels by working with existing food policy councils, national organizations and other interested groups. FPN aims to improve the food-related health, sustainability, and resilience of communities through food policy, and to leverage the Center’s experience, strengths and institutional resources to: (1) increase food policy networks, (2) build policy development capacity, (3) develop and use research to inform policymaking or policy change, and (4) deliver outreach services toward enabling citizens and stakeholders to influence their respective food systems through better public policy and improved use of federal, state and local resources.

…(read more).

Food-Matters
Global Climate Change
Environment Ethics
Environment Justice

SRI-Rice: Winner, Olam Prize for Innovation in Food Security


FarmingFirst

Published on Mar 19, 2015

Find out more about SRI-Rice, the winning technology for the inaugural Olam Prize for Innovation in Food Security 2015.

Food-Matters
Global Climate Change
Environment Ethics
Environment Justice

NASA ISS footage: Mesmerising view of Northern Lights from space


euronews (in English)

Published on Mar 19, 2015

Video taken from NASA’s International Space Station captures stunning Aurora Borealis light display over the North Pole and northern Russia. Wednesday 18 March.

Global Climate Change
Environment Ethics
Environment Justice

Key to Preventing Disasters Lies in Understanding Them

Thursday, March 19, 2015, By Ramesh Jaura

Flooding is declared a natural disaster Jan. 12, 2011 in Brisbane, Australia. Credit: Bigstock

SENDAI, Japan, Mar 18 2015 (IPS) – The Third World Conference on Disaster Risk Reduction concluded on Wednesday after a long drawn-out round of final negotiations, with representatives of 187 U.N. member states finally agreeing on what is being described as a far-reaching new framework for the next 15 years: 2015-2030.

But whether the adoption of the Sendai Framework for Disaster Risk Reduction (DRR) heralds the dawn of a new era – fulfilling U.N. Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon’s expectation on the opening day of the conference on Mar. 14 that “sustainability starts in Sendai” – remains to be seen.

Margareta Wahlström, the U.N. Secretary-General’s Special Representative for Disaster Risk Reduction and the Head of the U.N. Office for Disaster Risk Reduction (UNISDR), has emphasised that the new framework “opens a major new chapter in sustainable development as it outlines clear targets and priorities for action which will lead to a substantial reduction of disaster risk and losses in lives, livelihoods and health”.

But she warned on Wednesday that implementation of the new framework “will require strong commitment and political leadership and will be vital to the achievement of future agreements on sustainable development goals [in September] and climate later this year [in December in Paris]”.

The new framework outlines seven global targets and four priorities.

The global targets to be achieved over the next 15 years are: “a substantial reduction in global disaster mortality; a substantial reduction in numbers of affected people; a reduction in economic losses in relation to global GDP; substantial reduction in disaster damage to critical infrastructure and disruption of basic services, including health and education facilities; an increase in the number of countries with national and local disaster risk reduction strategies by 2020; enhanced international cooperation; and increased access to multi-hazard early warning systems and disaster risk information and assessments.”

…(read more).

Global Climate Change
Environment Ethics
Environment Justice

Professor Zeyaur Khan: Winner, Louis Malassis Prize for Outstanding Career in Agriculture


FarmingFirst

Published on Mar 19, 2015

Find out more about the work for Professor Zeyaur Khan, winner of the Louis Malassis International Scientific Prize for Outstanding Career in Agriculture.

Food-Matters
Global Climate Change
Environment Ethics
Environment Justice