Costing the Earth: The Challenge for Governments, the Opportunities for Business: Frances Cairncross

Frances Cairncross, environment editor of The Economist, shows how clear-sighted economic policies can be harnessed to help the environment, and how resourceful companies can turn the public’s concern for a cleaner environment to their corporate advantage. She argues that successful environmental policies will be the ones that encourage the inventive power of industry. Working together, industry and government can form a formidable alliance: one that fosters economic growth and preserves the environment.

Costing the Earth identifies an extraordinary opportunity for enterprise and invention, making it essential reading for all managers concerned about meeting the growing demands of a “green” economy. “[A] thoughtful and highly readable book. . .Cairncross’s range is wide-she covers programs from the United States to Kenya-and with an economist’s good sense she punctures sacred cows. . .She is generally an optimist; she believes that a mixture of market forces and government controls can solve most of our environmental problems”.-Allison Green, Sloan Management Review. “Costing the Earth is a very fine overview of issues that are infinitely complex. No manager should venture much further into this decade without reading it”.-Colin Tudge, Management Today.

Frances Cairncross is the Management Editor at The Economist and author of The Death of Distance: How the Communications Revolution Is Changing Our Lives. She resides in London, England.

Paperback:   368 pages
Publisher:
Harvard Business Review Press (March 1, 1993)

Global Climate Change
Environment Ethics
Environment Justice

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