Daily Archives: October 13, 2014

Food Heroes


Link TV

Published on Sep 26, 2014

(Earth Focus: Episode 68) Ground Operations, a new film by Dulanie Ellis and Raymond Singer, shows how farming provides both employment and therapeutic recovery for America’s combat veterans. Then, meet organic pioneers from Minnesota and Maryland. And, California’s Pie Ranch develops an innovative way to bring healthy food to a high tech giant while saving a small family business in the process.

Global Climate Change
Environment Ethics
Environment Justice

Turning Earth into Mars?


Link TV

Published on Jun 13, 2014

“We are Marsifying Earth,” says distinguished marine Biologist Dr. Sylvia Earle. “We are increasing the amount of carbon dioxide in our atmosphere… We are undermining the integrity of systems that yield what we need to live. What is more important than that? Our economy, our health, our security, or being alive? It starts with being alive.” Dr. Earle explains why the ocean is a life support system for the planet — but its becoming more acidic. “Most of the oxygen that we breathe comes from the ocean,” she says. “So we should take care of it as if our lives depend on it.”

Global Climate Change
Environment Ethics
Environment Justice

Water or Gold? – YouTube


Link TV

Published on Jun 27, 2014

For the indigenous people who live near Ecuador’s Kimsakocha wetlands, water here is a lifeline. It’s vital for domestic use, as well as for agriculture and livestock production. But there is gold under the water and the government of Ecuador has opened the area to foreign mining despite fierce local opposition. “Resistance will not end, we will not give up even if we are in prison,” says local community leader Carlos Perez. Kimsakocha contains over 3.3 million ounces of high grade gold valued at approximately US$30 million. Indigenous groups claim mining will affect groundwater and threaten their agricultural productivity. Correspondent Constantino de Miguel travels to Kimsakocha for this original Earth Focus report.

Global Climate Change
Environment Ethics
Environment Justice

Climate and National Security


Link TV

Published on Aug 5, 2014

Is climate change igniting turmoil around the world? Is it contributing to unrest in the Middle East and North Africa? Will it affect our capacity to respond to crises at home? Rear Admiral (Ret.) David W. Titley speaks to Earth Focus about how climate change impacts national security. Dr. Titley served as Commander, Naval Meteorology and Oceanography Command and as Oceanographer and Navigator of the Navy. He initiated and led the U.S. Navy’s Task Force on Climate Change. He is presently Director of the Center for Solutions to Weather and Climate Risk at Penn State University.

Global Climate Change
Environment Ethics
Environment Justice

A Conservative on Climate Change


Link TV

Published on Aug 6, 2014

It may be considered a heresy for a Republican member of Congress to say climate change is real and that we should do something about it. But that’s what Bob Ingliss (R-SC) did. He was a member of the House Science Committee and a Ranking Member of the Energy and Environment Subcommittee. Since leaving Congress in 2011, he devoted himself to convincing conservatives to support a revenue neutral carbon tax. He also founded the Energy and Enterprise Initiative. He explains what factors helped shape his views on climate change. Excerpts from his keynote address to the Citizens Climate Lobby, June 23, 2014. Washington, DC.

Find more Earth Focus content at https://www.linktv.org/earthfocus

Global Climate Change
Environment Ethics
Environment Justice

Mining Battles: Uranium, Coal, and Gold


Link TV

Published on Sep 11, 2014

(Earth Focus: Episode 67) An impoverished former mining community in Colorado hopes that a proposed uranium mill will bring jobs and prosperity until environmentalists step in to try to stop it. Who gets to decide? Filmmaker Suzan Beraza documents the debate in her new film Uranium Drive-In.

Rhinos are killed for their horn. But now in South Africa they face a new threat — coal. Plans for an open cast coal mine on the border of Hluhluwe-iMfolozi Park, home to the largest population in the world of the once endangered white rhino, may bring economic development. However, these plans will also worsen air and water quality and increase poaching and crime. Jeff Barbee reports from South Africa.

The indigenous people in Ecuador’s Kimsakocha wetlands rely on the land’s water for their livelihood — agriculture and livestock production. But there is gold under the water and foreign mining companies are out to get it. The local people mount a fierce opposition. “Resistance will not end, we will not give up even if we are in prison,” says local community leader Carlos Perez. Constantino de Miguel reports from Ecuador.

Global Climate Change
Environment Ethics
Environment Justice
Nuclear

New Rhino Threat: Coal


Link TV

Published on Aug 22, 2014

First poachers and now, coal? Over 1,000 rhino were killed for their horn in 2013. Poachers have killed nearly 500 rhino in South Africa in 2014 alone. Plans for an open cast coal mine on the border of South Africa’s Hluhluwe-iMfolozi Park are controversial. The park is home to the largest population of the white rhino in the world. For mine developers, it’s about jobs and economic development. But mine opponents are concerned about worsening air and water quality and increased poaching and crime. Jeff Barbee reports from South Africa.

Global Climate Change
Environment Ethics
Environment Justice