Daily Archives: October 4, 2014

Debunking the myths about the spread of Ebola in the US

E120, e145, e130, health,

New Evidence Links Global Heat Waves to Climate Change

E120, e130, e145

NOVA | 4 Multiverses You Might be Living In | PBS


PBS Published on Oct 4, 2014
Could parallel universes exist? If so, what would they look like and how would they form?

NOVA Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/NOVAonline
NOVA Twitter: https://www.twitter.com/novapbs

CREDITS

Produced, animated, and edited by Greg Kestin

Editorial help from Kate Becker, Anna Rothschild, and Lauren Aguirre

A special thanks to Andrew Friedman

Original Footage
© WGBH Educational Foundation 2014

Global Climate Change
Environment Ethics
Environment Justice

Tomgram: Todd Gitlin, As the Globe Warms, So Does the Climate Movement

Posted by Todd Gitlin at 7:00am, October 2, 2014.
Follow TomDispatch on Twitter @TomDispatch.

Don’t call it a “march.” It was a “stand” — and a first stand at that, not a last one. The People’s Climate March, billed as the largest climate demonstration in history, more than exceeded expectations and was an experience that has yet to desert me. Its moment couldn’t have been grimmer in global warming terms. That week, record-breaking concentrations of greenhouse gases were reported in the atmosphere, with the added grim news that the oceans and the forests, the planet’s major “carbon sinks,” were starting to absorb less CO2. Under the circumstances, I had the urge to do my bit to make the march huge and so organized a group of 16 friends and family members, ranging in age from 2 to 72. Marchers were to gather on New York’s Central Park West between 86th Street and Columbus Circle at 59th, where the event was to kick off at exactly 11:30 a.m. At 11, when our crew arrived at 72nd Street, designated as a meeting place for children, families, and oldsters like me, the main route along Central Park West was already jam-packed and feeder streets like ours were filling fast.

On our small, ever-tighter stretch of cement was a typically heterogeneous crew sporting small dogs, a large penguin doll, a gazillion handmade signs, and a strutting, dancing drum-and-cymbal band. Amid cheers, music, and conversation, time passed and passed and passed. Though those younger than me were getting texts indicating that the march had set off in a timely manner, we didn’t move. Not an inch. And then it began to dawn on me. This demonstration was going to be so big, with so many people feeding into it, that “marching” for many of us would be an alien activity. As TomDispatch regular Todd Gitlin makes thrillingly clear today, we were quite literally in the midst of a genuine movement being born. In fact, our crew, only 13 blocks north of the starting spot, didn’t even inch forward for more than an hour and a half after the official launch.

…(read more).

Global Climate Change
Environment Ethics
Environment Justice

US stores old nukes…to fight off asteroid threats

RT America

Published on Oct 4, 2014

The US government is stockpiling nuclear warhead components so that they can be used to destroy asteroids if need be, according to a report from the Government Accountability Office. A number of devices meant to be disassembled in 2015 will instead remain in storage, “pending a senior-level government evaluation of their use in planetary defense against earthbound asteroids.” RT’s Ameera David takes at the plan, as well as some of the recent close encounters that prompted the move.

Global Climate Change
Environment Ethics
Environment Justice

Nuclear

“What’s Possible,” a New Film for World Leaders on the Urgency of Globa l Warming

https://vimeo.com/106876736
from BillMoyers.com PRO 1 week ago Not Yet Rated

The film, narrated by Morgan Freeman, premiered before world leaders this morning at the UN climate change summit. Watch it here, along with an interview with the filmmakers, who share their urgent message with Bill.

Global Climate Change
Environment Ethics
Environment Justice

What’s So Funny About Climate Change

https://vimeo.com/107868979

Global Climate Change
Environment Ethics
Environment Justice

Media

Too Big to Jail? | Moyers & Company


A veteran bank regulator, William K. Black, lays bare how Washington and Wall St. are joined in a culture of corruption.

Global Climate Change
Environment Ethics
Environment Justice

Judges’ Responses | People’s Climate Justice Summit


The New School

Published on Sep 30, 2014

The Climate Justice Alliance (http://www.ourpowercampaign.org/cja/), including the Indigenous Environmental Network (http://www.ienearth.org/) and other allies, are planning a two-day People’s Climate Justice Summit concurrent to the Climate Leaders Assembly convened by the UN General Secretary Ban Ki Moon in New York City this September. The Summit delegates will convene at the UN Church Center, directly across the street from the UN, and the proceedings will be livestreamed for public viewing at The New School (http://www.newshchool.edu) on both days.

The purpose of this Summit is to convene a meeting of frontline community delegations from across the U.S. and around the world – that are both organizing against the root causes of climate change, and cultivating real solutions to address these causes. In response to the intransigence of political leaders in industrialized nations and corporations to take bold action, this convening will highlight strategies and pathways for resilience and resistance that are being built on the frontlines of this global economic and ecological crisis.

Part 5 of 6 features – Lisa Garcia, Jeremy Brecher, Rex Varona, Julia Olson, Cynthia Mellon.

The New School demonstrates our commitment to climate action and our solidarity with people converging on New York City for the historic People’s Climate March on September 21 with a week-long series of events focused on climate change. As a leader and official endorser of the March, The New School’s Climate Action Week includes a diverse set of programming directed towards the university and wider community for enriched learning and engagement opportunities, scholarship, innovation and creativity, solidarity and collective action, and highlighting New School’s values around climate justice and action

This event is co-sponsored by:

The New School for Public Engagement | http://www.newschool.edu/public-engag…
The Milano School of International Affairs, Management, and Urban Policy | http://www.newschool.edu/public-engag…
Parsons The New School For Design | http://www.newschool.edu/Parsons/
The Tishman Environment and Design Center | http://www.newschool.edu/tedc/
The Sustainable Cities Club | http://blogs.newschool.edu/epsm/about…

All panel discussion on this day will be held at The New School Auditorium, 66 West 12th Street.

Global Climate Change
Environment Ethics
Environment Justice

Climate Action Week: #FRACK OFF | Indigenous Women Leading Media Campaigns to Defend Our Climate


The New School

Published on Oct 3, 2014

The School of Media Studies (http://www.newschool.edu/public-engag…) at The New School for Public Engagement (http://www.newschool.edu/public-engag…) present a panel featuring activists Shelley A. Young, Kandi Mosset, Elle Maija Tailfeathers, and Ellen Gabriel who will discuss high-profile media campaigns by indigenous groups in Canada and the United States that protest the oil and fracking industries and the ongoing governmental violations of Tribal sovereignty and treaty rights.

Participants will include:

Ellen Gabriel (Mohawk) Human rights activist from Kanehsatà:ke, Ellen has spent years fighting for Indigenous rights well-known to the public when she was chosen by the People of the Longhouse and her community of Kanehsatà:ke to be their spokesperson during the 1990 “Oka” Crisis; to protect the Pines from the expansion of a 9 hole golf course in “Oka” and the removal of Kanien’kehá:ka ancestors from their burial ground. She is now a leading voice in fighting the Energy East and Line 9 tar sands pipelines. Kanehsatà:ke territory is right in the path of the proposed Enbridge #Line9 and Trans-Canada Energy East tar sands pipelines and Ellen has emerged as a key voice in the fight to stop tar sands expansion through organizing in solidarity with First Nations in Alberta and the 185 First Nations in the right of way of the controversial project.

Shelley A. Young is a Mi’kmaq leader from Eskasoni First Nation who engaged in a high-profile hunger strike to push Indian Act leadership in Mi’kma’ki to stop negotiating the Treaties with the provincial and federal government by stepping away from tripartite/self-government agreements and to bring awareness that they have been doing so, for the past 10 years, without any consultation with our communities. Shelley has been heavily involved in Elsipogtog and been on the front lines of the anti-fracking fight since the beginning, organizing numerous campaigns, sitting on panels, and conducting workshops at nearly every major university in the East Cfoast, along with high schools, to bring water protection and Aboriginal Rights awareness. Shelley also raised over $20,000 to help the Elsipogtog warriors legal costs and protest camp site.

Elle-Maija Tailfeathers is a Blood and Saami organizer and member of the Blood Indian Tribe in Southern Alberta, Canada. She was part of an Indigenous women-led action to stop two thirds of their lands from being leased to Murphy Oil for fracking, including the drilling of the deepest frack (2.1 km deep) in the history of the sector. She and four other women were arrested and detained for intimidation because of their peaceful non-violent action.

Kandi Mossett (Mandan, Hidatsa, Arikara) Native Energy & Climate Campaign Organizer was born in North Dakota and grew up in an area known today as the Fort Berthold Reservation. She obtained her undergraduate degree from the University of North Dakota (UND) in Natural Resource and Park Management. After working in the Park Service for 3 years she went on to earn a Masters of Environmental Management within UND’s Earth Systems Science and Policy Program. She began working for the Indigenous Environmental Network as the Tribal Campus Climate Challenge (TCCC) Organizer in February 2007, engaging over 30 tribal colleges and working on projects ranging from initiating recycling programs and community tree plantings to small-scale community solar panel installations and community gardens. Her work has since expanded to the international arena, within the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change, in an effort to create more awareness about international decision-making and its effect at the local level. Kandi continues to work primarily at the grassroots level bridging generational gaps in tribal communities while connecting the local to the national and the national to the international in an effort to raise aware- ness about sustainability and continue the fight towards just climate and energy solutions. Her current focus is on creating awareness about the environmentally and socially devastating effects of hydraulic fracturing due to severely limited regulations and protections, particularly on Tribal lands.

Sponsored by the School of Media Studies and co-organized in collaboration with Idle No More (http://www.idlenomore.ca/) and Frack Action, a leading New York-based organization working for a statewide ban on fracking as a part of Climate Action Week at The New School.

Saturday, September 20, 2014 at 5:00 pm to 7:00 pm
The Auditorium at 66 West 12th Street

Global Climate Change
Environment Ethics
Environment Justice