Daily Archives: July 2, 2014

New York court says cities can ban fracking


RT America

Published on Jul 2, 2014

New York’s Court of Appeals ruled in favor of anti-fracking activists Monday, saying local leaders have the authority to ban hydraulic fracturing within their municipalities. Environmentalists are now shifting their attention to the statewide moratorium banning the practice, which Gov. Andrew Cuomo must soon decide whether to lift or keep in place. RT’s Manila Chan discusses what is next in the environmentalists’ fight with Earth Justice attorney Deborah Goldberg.

Global Climate Change
Environment Ethics
Environment Justice

Health Ministers: Ebola Outbreak in West Africa Needs Stronger Response


VOAvideo

Published on Jul 2, 2014

Health ministers from across West Africa are attending an emergency conference in Ghana to discuss the regional outbreak of Ebola virus disease. The World Health Organization says the highly infectious disease has killed more than 400 people in Guinea, Liberia and Sierra Leone. Henry Ridgwell reports for VOA from London.

Global Climate Change
Environment Ethics
Environment Justice

Climate Change and Emperor Penguins


thomhartmann

Published on Jul 2, 2014

Thom explains why climate change is killing the Emperor Penguins.

Global Climate Change
Environment Ethics
Environment Justice

John Ryley, head of Sky News asks: What is the Future of News?


The RSA

Published on Jul 2, 2014

For more information about the event and to listen to the podcast go to the RSA event page: http://bit.ly/1mQFvSL

Watch John Ryley as he discusses the future of news. Exploring how a digital tomorrow will allow audiences to consume news when they want it, how they want it, and where they want it and asking how traditional journalistic values, new technology and changing consumer behaviour might have an impact on the gathering and delivery of news

Global Climate Change
Environment Ethics
Environment Justice

Before and after tar sands strip mining on Colorado Plateau


Peaceful Uprising

Published on Jul 1, 2014

Major construction begins at the second U.S Oil Sands’ tar sands strip mine. As many as 200 acres could be clearcut in this site. The company has paid their 2.2 million dollar bond to the Utah Division of Oil and Gas Mining (DOGM) and their operation has begun full force.

For more inforamtion, read more here: http://www.tarsandsresist.org/itson

Global Climate Change
Environment Ethics
Environment Justice

Our economy is a house of cards!


thomhartmann

Published on Jul 1, 2014

Thom rants on Paul Krugman’s recent article in the New York Times and explains why our economic system is a sham!

Environment Ethics
Environment Justice

Climate news: Arctic seafloor methane release is double previous estimates, and why that matters – AMERICAblog News

6/30/2014 10:00am by Gaius Publius

 

One of the greenhouse gases (GHGs) that Obama’s EPA Clean Power Plan doesn’t count is methane from leaks, for example, fracking leaks, fuel line leaks, transportation leaks, and so on. Yet methane (CH4) is one of the most powerful greenhouse gases known, though very short-lived (most atmospheric methane disappears in about 12 years, becoming CO2 and water vapor).

And one of the cornerstones of the idea that mankind still has a “carbon budget” — that we can still release even more CO2 and other greenhouse gases like methane, though a “limited” amount — is the idea that we can do a good job of modeling climate-changing feedbacks. We can do a good job of modeling some feedbacks, but we’re very bad at modeling others, and some feedbacks have so much randomness about them that modeling them becomes next to impossible.

For an example of seemingly good models that have gotten things drastically wrong, take a look at what 13 Arctic-ice models said about the ice melt rate (loss of ice is a feedback, since it’s cause by warming, and then feeds more warming back to the system):

Loss of summer Arctic sea ice, modeled vs. observed (source here; adapted from Fig. 1 here)

All of the fuzzy lines are predictions of various models using the assumptions of that model. The heavy black line is the mean of those models. The red line is observed loss. Note that today, we’re about at the place the IPCC models had us reaching 90 years from now. The observations peak at about 9 million square kilometers, and we’re now at about 3 million. When we reach 1 million square kilometers, the Arctic will be considered “ice free.” Not long after that, summer ice will go to actual zero. With increased warming, winter ice will go to zero also.

See why I’m always saying we’re “wrong to the slow side”? If you think a climate event will happen in some number of years, cut it in half, at least, and maybe in half again.

For an example of a process that’s almost impossible to model, consider the disappearance of Antarctic ice shelves. They don’t go gradually; they hang around, then go suddenly and in big chunks, as they have recently. We’ve crossed the point of no return on large parts of the Western Antarctic shelf. No one saw that coming when it did, and there was no way to model it. That system is just too complex, with too many unknowns.

Global Climate Change
Environment Ethics
Environment Justice