Daily Archives: March 31, 2014

Climate change forces ag talk

AMES, Ia. – Farmers need to help find solutions for climate change, experts said Saturday during a forum in Ames.

“We’re not just victims here; we can be engaged in the solution,” said Matt Russell, coordinator of the Drake Agricultural Law Program’s State Food Policy Project and co-owner of Coyote Run Farm.

Iowa Interfaith Power and Light — an advocacy group that encourages aggressive efforts to slow human-caused global warming and mitigate the effects of climate changes — hosted the panel at Bethesda Lutheran Church in Ames.

About 75 people sat at tables in the church. Moderator Mike Glover, a former Associated Press political reporter, began the discussion by asking the panelists how they see climate change affecting agriculture and if they believed the current agricultural system can continue to exist if climate change continues at its current pace.

Farmers need to think about how to adapt to the effects of climate change because there is already evidence that Iowa agriculture is being affected by greenhouse gases, said Christopher Anderson, an Iowa State University climate scientist and agronomist.

“I think that what we are doing is creating a future agriculture that is going to require people my age and younger, who are the farmers of the future, to make very different capital investments than they make nowadays,” Anderson said. “They’re going to have to reshape their farms in very serious ways.”

Joan Fumetti, a former Foods Resource Bank staff member, said people need to evaluate if they like the current agricultural system.

….(read more).

Global Climate Change
Environmental Justice
Environment Ethics
Food-Matters

Exxon: Highly Unlikely World Limits Fossil Fuels – ABC News

NEW YORK March 31, 2014 (AP)
By JONATHAN FAHEY AP Energy Writer

On the same day the world’s scientists issued their latest report on climate change and the risks it poses to society, the nation’s biggest oil and gas company said the world’s climate policies are “highly unlikely” to stop it from selling fossil fuels far into the future.

Exxon Mobil issued a report Monday on the risks that climate change policies could pose to the value of its assets and future profitability, by coincidence on the same day as the latest paper by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, a Nobel Prize-winning United Nations group assembled to assess the science and risks of climate change.

Both Exxon and its critics used IPCC research to bolster their cases.

Exxon’s report was in response to the contentions of some shareholders and environmental activists that the assets underpinning the value of Exxon and other fossil fuel companies will be worth less as society restricts consumption of fossil fuels to fight climate change.

The report, the first detailed response to these concerns by a major oil company, acknowledges the need to adopt policies to address climate change. But it concludes that because oil and gas are so critical to global development and economic growth, governments are “highly unlikely” to adopt policies that cut emissions so sharply that fossil fuel consumption would be severely restricted.

“We know enough based on the research and science that the risk (of climate change) is real and appropriate steps should be taken to address that risk,” Ken Cohen, Exxon’s government affairs chief, said in an interview Monday. “But given the essential role that energy plays in everyone’s lives, those steps need to be taken in context with other realities we face, including lifting much of the world’s population out of poverty.”

….(read more).

Global Climate Change
Environmental Justice
Environment Ethics

Exxon sees little climate change risk to assets | Reuters

(Reuters) – Exxon Mobil Corp, the world’s largest publicly traded oil company, said on Monday that risks related to climate change pose little risk to its oil and gas reserves because the resources will be needed to meet expected growth in energy demand.

Responding to queries from shareholder activists, the company also said it is “confident” that none of its oil and gas reserves will lose value or become “stranded” if governments act to slash carbon emissions.

“We believe producing these assets is essential to meeting growing energy demand worldwide, and in preventing consumers – especially those in the least developed and most vulnerable economies – from themselves becoming stranded in the global pursuit of higher living standards and greater economic opportunity,” Exxon said in a report released in response to call from activist shareholders.

Earlier this month, the Irving, Texas-based company agreed to detail the risks climate change poses to its carbon assets in exchange for the withdrawal of a shareholder proposal on the issue.

The resolution, filed by investors from As You Sow and Arjuna Capital, cited studies suggesting that lower demand or prices for fossil fuels might emerge in coming years as a result of climate change or greater carbon regulation.

….(read more).

Global Climate Change
Environmental Justice
Environment Ethics
Cyprus International Institute (CII) (Harvard School of Public Health) http://Cyprus-Institute.us
Food-Matters

Exxon: Climate change rules won’t halt oil and gas; fuels too important for global development | Star Tribune

  • Article by: JONATHAN FAHEY , Associated Press
  • Updated: March 31, 2014 – 7:30 PM

NEW YORK — On the same day the world’s scientists issued their latest report on climate change and the risks it poses to society, the nation’s biggest oil and gas company said the world’s climate policies are “highly unlikely” to stop it from selling fossil fuels far into the future.

Exxon Mobil issued a report Monday on the risks that climate change policies could pose to the value of its assets and future profitability, by coincidence on the same day as the latest paper by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, a Nobel Prize-winning United Nations group assembled to assess the science and risks of climate change.

Both Exxon and its critics used IPCC research to bolster their cases.

Exxon’s report was in response to the contentions of some shareholders and environmental activists that the assets underpinning the value of Exxon and other fossil fuel companies will be worth less as society restricts consumption of fossil fuels to fight climate change.

…(read more).

Global Climate Change
Environmental Justice
Environment Ethics

Climate change could lead to envious eyes on Canada’s water: report

Bob Weber, The Canadian Press
Published Monday, March 31, 2014 4:17PM EDT
Last Updated Monday, March 31, 2014 7:09PM EDT

Top scientists say the latest international report on climate change shows that Canadians must wake up to the impact of warming temperatures on land, on water and in communities across the country.

They say the Intergovernmental Report on Climate Change, released Sunday in Japan, shows changes are on their way and further delays in responding to them only narrow the options.

“We no longer have the option of choosing between mitigation and adaptation,” Debra Davidson, a University of Alberta sociologist and lead author on the report, said Monday.

Related Stories

Photos

 

This Oct. 5, 2011 satellite photo from a NASA website shows algae blooms swirling on Lake Erie. (AP Photo/NASA)

“We’re already locked into a global warming scenario in which adaptation will be absolutely necessary if we want a reasonable quality of life,” said Davidson, one of more than 2,000 scientists and expert reviewers from 70 countries who contributed.

The report says crop patterns will need to shift. Although some studies predict better growing conditions in more northern latitudes, disruptions to normal rain and snowfall patterns will cause problems, it suggests.

“There’s always been some predictions in some areas that some crops will do better,” said John Smol, a biologist at Queen’s University in Montreal. “But if the drought frequency continues, what’s the economic cost of a 10-year drought?”

Read more: http://kitchener.ctvnews.ca/climate-change-could-lead-to-envious-eyes-on-canada-s-water-report-1.1754272#ixzz2xb7E73b1

Global Climate Change
Environmental Justice
Environment Ethics
Food-Matters

Climate Change Is Hurting Crop Yields: Oppenheimer

March 31 (Bloomberg) –- In today’s “Global Outlook,” Dr. Michael Oppenheimer, co-author of the WGII report, discusses the impact of climate change on the global food supply. He speaks with Trish Regan on Bloomberg Television’s “Street Smart.” (Source: Bloomberg)

http://www.bloomberg.com/video/climate-change-is-hurting-crop-yields-oppenheimer-a8kNJFmUSNqf4tAZA~FxiQ.html

Global Climate Change
Environmental Justice
Environment Ethics
Food-Matters

Climate change puts world’s food supply at risk: UN science panel

Seth Borenstein, The Associated Press
Published Monday, March 31, 2014 5:54AM EDT
Last Updated Monday, March 31, 2014 5:21PM EDT

YOKOHAMA, Japan — Global warming makes feeding the world harder and more expensive, a United Nations scientific panel said.

A warmer world will push food prices higher, trigger “hotspots of hunger” among the world’s poorest people, and put the crunch on Western delights like fine wine and robust coffee, the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change concluded in a 32-volume report issued Monday.

“We’re facing the spectre of reduced yields in some of the key crops that feed humanity,” panel chairman Rajendra Pachauri said in press conference releasing the report.

Related Stories

Related Links

UN Secretary General Ban Ki-moon, centre, and Greenland’s Environment Minister Kim Kielsen, right, Tuesday, March 25, 2014 in Ilulissat in Greenland, a visit in preparation for the UN Climate Summit in September this year. (AP Photo/POLFOTO, Leiff Josefsen)

Even though heat and carbon dioxide are often considered good for plants, the overall effect of various aspects of man-made warming is that it will reduce food production compared to a world without global warming, the report said.

The last time the panel reported on the effects of warming in 2007, it said it was too early to tell whether climate change would increase or decrease food production, and many skeptics talked of a greening world. But in the past several years the scientific literature has been overwhelming in showing that climate change hurts food production, said Chris Field of the Carnegie Institution of Science and lead author of the climate report.

But this doesn’t mean in 50 years there will be less food grown. Thanks to the “green revolution” of improved agricultural techniques, crop production is growing about 10 per cent per decade and climate change is likely to reduce yields by 1 per cent a decade, so crop production will still go up, but not as fast, said David Lobell of Stanford University, one of the authors of the report’s chapter on food problems.

Read more: http://www.ctvnews.ca/sci-tech/climate-change-puts-world-s-food-supply-at-risk-un-science-panel-1.1753306#ixzz2xaxeq600

Global Climate Change
Environmental Justice
Environment Ethics
Food-Matters