Daily Archives: March 30, 2014

Joseph Tainter – The Energy Crisis and the End of The Industrial Age


LegaliseFreedom1

Published on May 4, 2013

First published August 7, 2012

The Energy Crisis and the end of The Industrial Age with Dr Joseph Tainter of Utah State University. Dr Tainter is perhaps best known as the author of The Collapse of Complex Societies and amongst various other publications he also co-authored Drilling Down: The Gulf Oil Debacle and Our Energy Dilemma. The discussion focusses on areas covered by both books, specifically the energy that industrial society depends on for its survival and continued growth and what happens when the supply of this energy begins to decline on the road to running out.

Topics discussed include: peak oil, the 2010 Gulf oil disaster, competition and conflict for resources, renewable energy, decline of technological innovation, the green movement and sustainable development, the energy/complexity spiral and the collapse of society.

Background:
For more than a century, oil has been the engine of growth for a society that delivers an unprecedented standard of living to many. We now take for granted that economic growth is good, necessary, and even inevitable, but also feel a sense of unease about the simultaneous growth of complexity in the processes and institutions that generate and manage that growth. As societies grow more complex through the bounty of cheap energy, they also confront problems that seem to increase in number and severity. In this era of fossil fuels, cheap energy and increasing complexity have been in a mutually-reinforcing spiral. The more energy we have and the more problems our societies confront, the more we grow complex and require still more energy. Our demand for energy, our technological prowess, the resulting need for complex problem solving and the end of easy oil are now conspiring to make the end of the industrial age a certainty. It’s no longer a question of if, but when.

Many more interviews at http://www.legalise-freedom.com

Environment Ethics
Food-Matters

John Michael Greer – The Long Descent

LegaliseFreedom1

Published on Apr 22, 2013

First published May 31, 2012.

John Michael Greer on peak oil and the end of the industrial age.

In his compelling book The Long Descent, John presents a challenging new vision of the future, traces the decline and fall of an industrial society fatally out of balance with planetary limits and shows how personal change and local action can shape a better tomorrow.

Topics discussed include: peak oil, the energy crisis, nuclear power, the myth of progress, the myth of apocalypse, the global financial crisis, population growth, technology, societal collapse, survivalism, getting rid of your TV and — the good news

Collapse of Complex Societies by Dr. Joseph Tainter


vlada881

Published on Aug 6, 2012

http://localfuture.org The collapse of complex societies of the past can inform the present on the risks of collapse. Dr. Joseph Tainter, author of the book The Collapse of Complex societies, and featured in Leonardo Dicaprio’s film The Eleventh Hour, details the factors that led to the collapse of past civilizations including the Roman Empire.

2010 International Conference on Sustainability: Energy, Economy, and Environment organized by Local Future nonprofit and directed by Aaron Wissner.

Global Climate Change
Environmental Justice
Environment Ethics
Food-Matters

Dr. David Montgomery – Dirt: The Erosion of Civilizations (September 9, 2013)


WabashCollege

Published on Sep 9, 2013

In Dirt: The Erosion of Civilizations, Montgomery makes the case that soil erosion should be seen as a threat to our planet as serious as climate change. Once bare of protective vegetation and exposed to wind and rain through agriculture, cultivated soils erode bit by bit, faster than they can be naturally replenished. The erosion is slow enough to be ignored in a single lifetime but fast enough over centuries to limit the lifespan of civilizations. In this engaging talk, Montgomery traces the role of soil use and abuse in the history of societies, from Mesopotamia to European colonialism and the American push westward. He explores how soil has shaped us and we have shaped soil. David Montgomery is a professor of Earth and Space Sciences at the University of Washington and studies geomorphology, the evolution of landscapes. In 2008 he received a MacArthur ‘genius’ award for his “fundamental contributions to our understanding of the geophysical forces that determine landscape evolution and of how our use of soils and rivers has shaped civilizations past and present”. He has received two Washington State Book awards, one for King of Fish: The Thousand-Year Run of Salmon in 2004, and for Dirt:The Erosion of Civilizations in 2008.

Global Climate Change
Environmental Justice
Environment Ethics
Food-Matters

David R. Montgomery – The Rocks Don’t Lie (September 9, 2013)


WabashCollege

Published on Sep 10, 2013

The Rocks Don’t Lie: A Geologist Investigates Noah’s Flood In Tibet, geologist David R. Montgomery heard a local story about a great flood that bore a striking similarity to Noah’s Flood. Intrigued, Montgomery began investigating the world’s flood stories and—drawing from historic works by theologians, natural philosophers, and scientists—discovered the counterintuitive role that the story of Noah’s Flood played in the development of both geology and creationism. Montgomery will take us for a journey across landscapes and cultures with an explorer’s eye and a refreshing approach to both faith and science. In the process we discover the elusive nature of truth, whether viewed through the lens of science or religion, and how our understanding changed through history and continues changing today. David R. Montgomery is a professor of Earth and Space Sciences at the University of Washington, studying geomorphology, the evolution of landscapes. In 2008 he received a MacArthur ‘genius’ award for his “fundamental contributions to our understanding of the geophysical forces that determine landscape evolution and of how our use of soils and rivers has shaped civilizations past and present”. He has received two Washington State Book awards, one for King of Fish: The Thousand-Year Run of Salmon in 2004, and for Dirt:The Erosion of Civilizations in 2008.

Global Climate Change
Environmental Justice
Environment Ethics
Food-Matters

Redesigning Civilization — with Permaculture


Toby Hemenway

Published on Jan 3, 2013

Modern agriculture, industry and finance all extract more than they give back, and the Earth is starting to show the strain. How did we get in this mess and what can we do to help our culture get back on track? The ecological design approach known as permaculture offers powerful tools for the design of regenerative, fair ways to provide food, energy, livelihood, and other needs while letting humans share the planet with the rest of nature. This presentation will give you insight into why our culture has become fundamentally unsustainable, and offers ecologically based solutions that can help create a just and sustainable society. This is the sequel to Toby’s popular talk, “How Permaculture Can Save Humanity and The Planet, but not Civilization.” A related article is at http://www.patternliteracy.com/697-th…

Global Climate Change
Environmental Justice
Environment Ethics
Food-Matters

Dave Montgomery – Dirt: The Erosion of Civilizations

UBC

Uploaded on Feb 24, 2011

Webcast sponsored by the Irving K. Barber Learning Centre. Author David Montgomery has discovered that the three-foot-deep skin of our planet is slowly being eroded away, with potentially devastating results. In this engaging lecture, Montgomery draws from his book ‘Dirt: The Erosion of Civilizations’ to trace the role of soil use and abuse in the history of societies, and discuss how the rise of organic and no-till farming bring hope for a new agricultural revolution.

Global Climate Change
Environmental Justice
Environment Ethics
Cyprus International Institute (CII) (Harvard School of Public Health) http://Cyprus-Institute.us
Food-Matters