Daily Archives: March 26, 2014

Three months of this season’s epic winter, animated

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“Every Telephone Call Made Everyone That YOU Make Everyone YOU Receive IS RECORDED”

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Study: Minorities soon to outnumber whites

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Exxon Valdez disaster…25 years later

E120, e145,

Looking Back and Moving Forward on Environmental Justice: Harvard Law School Environmental Law Society Hosts National Conference | Environmental Justice

By Sam Caravello, Gen Parshalle, and Cecelia Segal

For decades, grassroots activists and their allies have worked to end environmental disparities between communities. The environmental justice movement, which grew out of the civil rights movement, questioned why low income communities and communities of color are beset by more polluting industries, suffer higher rates of asthma and cancer, and enjoy fewer environmental amenities like parks and access to nutritious food.

Twenty years ago, government began to respond. In 1994, President Clinton issued Executive Order 12898, which made Environmental Justice a national priority and gave activists hope that politically underrepresented communities overburdened by environmental harms would soon have a voice and vehicle for bringing about justice. State governments began responding, too. In 1994, only four states addressed environmental justice by law or executive order. Today, all 50 states and the District of Columbia have some form of environmental justice law, executive order, or policy, demonstrating recognition of environmental justice as a critical issue deserving government attention. For more details see EJ Milestones and Accomplishments: 1964-2014, a report by the Barbara Jordan-Mickey Leland School of Public Affairs at Texas Southern University.

….(read more).

Global Climate Change
Environmental Justice
Environment Ethics

The Challenges of Climate Change Communication

30onClimate

Streamed live on Jan 15, 2014

Yale Forum regular contributor Bruce Lieberman hosts a
discussion on the unique and demanding challenges that communicators must overcome when addressing climate change issues. What exactly is it about climate change that makes it what communicators call a “wicked” issue? Are climate scientists the solution … or themselves part of the problem? And who, exactly, is best positioned to address which diverse audience segment?

NOTE: This webcast took place at 12 pm PST / 3 pm EST

Participants:

BRUCE LIEBERMAN (moderator) is a freelance science writer based in Southern California near San Diego. He has written about climate change for more than a decade.

RICHARD ALLEY, Ph.D., a professor in Penn State University’s Department of Geosciences, is a Member of the National Academy of Sciences and the author of award-winning books such as The Two-Mile Time Machine and Earth: The Operators’ Manual, the latter of which is also a PBS documentary. Widely recognized as an outstanding science communicator, Alley is a member of the United Nations’ IPCC.

SUSANNE MOSER, Ph.D., directs her own independent research and consulting firm in Santa Cruz, California. A frequent speaker and author on science communication issues, Moser is a Social Science Research Fellow at the Woods Institute for the Environment at Stanford University and a Research Associate at the University of California-Santa Cruz, Institute for Marine Sciences. She has previously worked at the National Center for Atmospheric Research and with the Union of Concerned Scientists.

Questions Pre/Post-Webcast: 30onClimate.

Global Climate Change
Environmental Justice
Environment Ethics
Food-Matters

2014: The Year Ahead in Climate Change News

30onClimate

Streamed live on Dec 20, 2013

Hosted by Yale Forum regular contributor Bruce Lieberman, 30onClimate’s premier webcast recorded on Dec. 20 offers four journalists’ perspectives on major climate issues anticipated in the 2014 new year. Topics include forthcoming Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) reports, EPA proposed rulemaking on power plant emissions, NASA satellite launches to collect better climate change data, and the congressionally mandated National Climate Assessment report intended to inform audiences of climate change impacts across the U.S.

Participants: Bruce Lieberman (moderator), Zeke Hausfather, Lisa Palmer, John Wihbey

BRUCE LIEBERMAN is a freelance science writer based in Southern California near San Diego. He has written about climate change for more than a decade. Twitter: @brucelieberman1 E-mail: bruce.

ZEKE HAUSFATHER, an energy systems analyst and environmental economist who has published in the fields of environmental economics, energy modeling and climate science, is currently a researcher at Berkeley Earth in Northern California. Twitter: @hausfath E-mail: zeke.

LISA PALMER is a freelance journalist based in Maryland. She reports on climate change, the environment, energy, and sustainable business. Twitter: @Lisa_Palmer E-mail: lisa.

JOHN WIHBEY is an editor and researcher at the Harvard Kennedy School’s Shorenstein Center. He manages the JournalistsResource.org project. Twitter: @wihbey E-mail: john.

Global Climate Change
Environmental Justice
Environment Ethics
Food-Matters