Daily Archives: March 3, 2014

XL Dissent 398 Youth Arrested at Anti Keystone XL Pipeline Protest at White House


freespeechtv

Published on Mar 3, 2014

On Sunday, 398 opponents of the proposed Keystone XL tar sands oil pipeline were arrested in front of the White House in what could be the largest youth sit-in on the environment in a generation. Students from more than 80 colleges rallied at Georgetown University and then marched to the White House, wearing mock “hazmat suits” and holding banners with slogans like “Keep your oil out of my soil” and “Even Voldemort Hates Tar Sands.” President Obama is expected to issue a decision in the next few months on the pipeline, which would transport 830,000 barrels of crude every day from Alberta’s oil sands to refineries on the U.S. gulf coast.

Published on Mar 3, 2014

http://www.democracynow.org – On Sunday, 398 opponents of the proposed Keystone XL tar sands oil pipeline were arrested in front of the White House in what could be the largest youth sit-in on the environment in a generation. Students from more than 80 colleges rallied at Georgetown University and then marched to the White House, wearing mock “hazmat suits” and holding banners with slogans like “Keep your oil out of my soil” and “Even Voldemort Hates Tar Sands.” President Obama is expected to issue a decision in the next few months on the pipeline, which would transport 830,000 barrels of crude every day from Alberta’s oil sands to refineries on the U.S. gulf coast. We speak to American University student Deirdre Shelly about why she was arrested on Sunday and the growing student-led movement to convince universities, colleges and cities to divest from fossil fuel companies.

Global Climate Change
Environmental Justice
Environment Ethics

We Have the Right to Know What’s in Our Food

freespeechtv

Published on Mar 3, 2014

The Obama administration’s new food labeling requirements are a good start – but they don’t go far enough – and don’t mention GMOs.

Environmental Justice
Environment Ethics
Food-Matters

US shows hypocrisy in telling Russia to stay out of Ukraine


RT America

Published on Mar 3, 2014

Washington has threatened Russia several times since Saturday to stay out of Ukraine. President Barack Obama spoke to Russian President Vladimir Putin about it over the phone. Then, on Monday, US Secretary of State John Kerry spoke of the unacceptability of invading a sovereign country on phony pretexts in order to assert one’s own interests in the 21st century. But no, he was not speaking about the United States, as one might have thought. RT’s Anastasia Churkina takes a look at the hypocrisy of the US rhetoric towards Russia over the situation in Ukraine.

Global Climate Change
Environmental Justice
Environment Ethics

Climate Change Speaker Series: Bob Massie – 03.04.14

03.04.14 – Climate Change Speaker Series: Bob Massie

03.04.14 – Climate Change Speaker Series: Bob Massie

Rev. Dr. Bob Massie

Tackling Climate Change: The Compelling Logic of Fossil Fuel Divestment

Tuesday 3/4, 5:30-7:00PM, 35-225 [Map]

We are very excited to be joined by Rev. Dr. Bob Massie for our second Climate Change Speaker Series event. Massie is President of the New Economy Coalition, an author, environmentalist and social activist. He is the former Executive Director of CERES, the largest coalition of environmental groups and institutional investors in the United States. In 2002, Massie was named one of the financial world’s 100 most influential people by CFO Magazine. His award-winning book, Loosing the Bonds, is the seminal account of the grassroots movement that compelled American corporations to divest during the Apartheid era.

Dr. Massie will be sharing with us his first-hand insights into the theory and effectiveness of divestment, and discussing how these translate into a compelling logic for fossil fuel divestment as a strategy to tackle climate change.

Global Climate Change
Environmental Justice
Environment Ethics

Nuclear Security Matters

Nuclear Security Matters provides accessible analysis from the world’s leading experts on nuclear security and nuclear terrorism. This website is intended to help inform researchers, reporters, government officials, and the interested public on policy options for strengthening nuclear security and reducing the risk of nuclear terrorism.

This website was produced by the Project on Managing the Atom at Harvard Kennedy School’s Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs. The Project on Managing the Atom conducts and disseminates policy-relevant research on nuclear weapons, nuclear energy, and nuclear non-proliferation and disarmament. The project supports an international group of pre- and post-doctoral fellows and other experts working on these issues and helps to advance their research work through seminars, workshops, and conferences.

Global Climate Change
Environmental Justice
Environment Ethics
Nuclear

Fracking fluids dumped into the ocean

E120, e145, e130

China’s looming water crisis – News – The Ecologist

China-Water

This scene from Dujiangyan illustrates traditional harmony of water in the Chinese landscape. Photo: Joshua Bateman.

Joshua Bateman 25th February 2014

One unintended consequence of China’s spectacular economic growth is a growing water shortage, reports Joshua Bateman. As rivers run dry, aquifers sink, climate harshens and pollution spreads, he asks: can China solve its water crisis?

As more water infrastructure projects are built, hundreds of thousands citizens must relocate every year to accommodate the construction.

In a report by the Chinese News Service, Jiao Yong, Vice Minister of Water Resources, said, “China has more than 400 cities short of water, some 110 of which are facing serious scarcity.”

A study by the China’s Ministry of Water Resources found that approximately 55% of China’s 50,000 rivers that existed in the 1990s have … disappeared.

According to Jiang Liping, senior irrigation specialist at the World Bank in Beijing, China is over-exploiting its groundwater by 22 billion cubic meters a year – yet per capita water consumption is less than one third of the global average.

“China faces a severe water scarcity issue in water resources right now and it’s getting more serious because of rampant economic growth … Right now, the economy takes too much water from the environment so the ecological environment has been degraded.”

The Issue

According to a 2012 joint UNICEF and WHO study, 593 million Chinese have gained access to improved sanitation since 1990. However, even with the increased access to cleaner water, China still faces a significant supply deficit.

As more people migrate to cities and join the middle class, their water consumption increases. With urbanization, the use of toilets, showers, and washing machines increases as does the consumption of nondurable goods such as meat, alcohol, clothes and electronics, all of which require water for production.

The Water Footprint Network reports that Chinese annual per capita water consumption is 1,071 m3. Data from the Ministry of Water Resources show that in 2008, agriculture accounted for 62% of demand, industry for 24%, domestic for 12%, and replenishment for 2%.

However, industry and domestic will drive future demand. According to McKinsey data, in 2030 agriculture demand will account for 51%, industry 32%, and 16% will go towards municipal and domestic uses.

China’s water efficiency is another problem. Industry in China continues to expand and compared to other countries, is highly inefficient. Liping said, “water use efficiency and water productivity in both industry and agriculture are very low.”

According to Andreas Fruschki, Portfolio Manager of the $268 million Allianz Global Water Mutual Fund, “most emerging markets continue to rely on bottled water in plastic or tap water which is not potable and has to be boiled before consumption, which is expensive and inefficient.”

A catalogue of problems

Another challenge China faces is logistics. More than 60% of China’s water is in the southern part of the country, but most of the usage is in the north and coastlines.

As Debra Tan, Head of China Water Risk, a Hong Kong-based non-profit explains, “45% of China’s GDP is derived from water-scarce provinces. It is not easy to grow your economy with limited water and geographical issues beyond your control.”

….(read more).

See also: The Ecologist: China

Global Climate Change
Environmental Justice
Environment Ethics
Food-Matters