Daily Archives: January 14, 2014

Accelerated Climate Change: Can Nature Adapt?

Forum Network

Published on Jan 14, 2014

A leading authority on conservation issues, especially flora and fauna adaptations to rapid climate change, Professor Primack brings a truly global perspective to Nature’s rapid response mechanisms. He discusses changes in the Massachusetts habitat that Henry David Thoreau made famous, and describes the limitations of plants and animals to adapt to this era of intense current climate stress.

Richard B. Primack is a Professor in the Biology Department at Boston University. He received his B.A. at Harvard University in 1972 and his Ph.D. at Duke University in 1976, and then was a postdoctoral fellow at the University of Canterbury. He has served as a visiting professor at the University of Hong Kong and Tokyo University, and has been awarded Bullard and Putnam Fellowships from Harvard University and a Guggenheim Fellowship. Dr. Primack was President of the Association for Tropical Biology and Conservation, and is currently Editor-in-Chief of the journal Biological Conservation. Twenty-seven foreign-language editions of his textbooks have been produced, with local coauthors adding in local examples. He is an author of rain forest books, most recently Tropical Rain Forests: An Ecological and Biogeographical Comparison, Second Edition (with Richard Corlett). Dr. Primack’s research interests include: the biological impacts of climate change; the loss of species in protected areas; tropical forest ecology and conservation; and conservation education. He is currently writing a popular book about changes in Concord since the time of Henry David Thoreau and Walden.

For further information see:

http://www.scienceforthepublic.org/earth/accelerated-climate-change-can-nature-adapt/

Global Climate Change
Environmental Justice
Environment Ethics
Cyprus International Institute (CII) (Harvard School of Public Health) http://Cyprus-Institute.us
Food-Matters

Science for the Public

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Science for the Public is committed to improving public knowledge of science and public appreciation for the contributions of science to social progress.

Environment Ethics

Erin Brockovich: After Chemical Spill, West Virginians Organizing “Stronger Than I’ve Ever Seen”


democracynow

Published on Jan 14, 2014

http://www.democracynow.org – West Virginia has begun partially lifting its ban on tap water five days after a chemical spill in the Elk River. More than 300,000 residents have been unable to use their water for drinking, cooking or bathing since Thursday, when the company Freedom Industries leaked up to 7,500 gallons of 4-methylcyclohexanemethanol (Crude MCHM), an agent used in coal extraction, into the water supply. Scores of schools and businesses have been closed, including in the state capital, Charleston. The ban has been lifted in four zones so far, but is still in effect for a vast majority of residents. Dozens of people have been hospitalized since the spill, with symptoms including nausea, vomiting, dizziness, diarrhea, rashes and reddened skin. We get reaction from Erin Brockovich, the renowned environmentalist, consumer advocate and legal researcher. While a single mother of three working as a legal assistant, she helped win the biggest class-action lawsuit in American history, holding the California power company Pacific Gas & Electric Company for polluting a city’s water supply. Her story was told in the Oscar-winning film “Erin Brockovich.” Today, Brockovich and her team are investigating the spill in West Virginia. On Monday evening, she held a town hall meeting in Charleston to discuss the spill with local residents. “They’re banding together stronger than I’ve ever seen before,” Brockovich says of West Virginians self-organizing in the spill’s aftermath.

Environmental Justice
Environment Ethics

S0 News January 14, 2014: Storm and Spaceweather Report


Suspicious0bservers

Published on Jan 14, 2014

Website: http://www.suspicious0bservers.org
Blog: http://www.suspicious0bserverscollect… (Click Daily News for all the Charts/Interactives)
Major Warnings/Alerts: https://twitter.com/TheRealS0s

Global Climate Change
Environment Ethics

Noam Chomsky on Legacy of Ariel Sharon: Not Speaking Ill of the Dead “Imposes a Vow of Silence”

democracynow

Published on Jan 13, 2014

http://www.democracynow.org – Former Israeli Prime Minister Ariel Sharon died Saturday after eight years in a coma at the age of 85. Sharon was one of the most dominant political figures in Israel’s history, involved in each of Israel’s major wars dating back to its founding in 1948. Among Palestinians, Sharon was one of the most reviled political figures in the history of the Israeli-Palestinian conflict. He is seen as father of the settlement movement and an architect of the Israeli invasion of Lebanon that killed a reported 20,000 Palestinian and Lebanese. We discuss Sharon’s legacy with three guests: Noam Chomsky, world-renowned political dissident, linguist, author and Institute Professor Emeritus at Massachusetts Institute of Technology; Rashid Khalidi, Edward Said Professor of Arab Studies at Columbia University; and Avi Shlaim, Emeritus Professor of International Relations at Oxford University, widely regarded as one of the world’s leading scholars on the Israeli-Arab conflict. “There is a convention that you’re not supposed to speak ill of the recently dead, which unfortunately imposes a kind of vow of silence, because there is nothing good to say,” Chomsky says. “He was a brutal killer; he had one fixed idea in mind which drove him all his life — a greater Israel, as powerful as possible, as few Palestinians as possible… He doubtless showed courage and commitment to pursuing this ideal, which is an ugly and horrific one.”

Watch Part 2 of this discussion

See all Democracy Now! coverage of the Israeli-Palestinian conflict in our YouTube playlist: http://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=…

Environmental Justice
Environment Ethics

West Virginia Water Crisis: Behind Chemical Spill, Gaping Holes in State and Federal Regulation


democracynow

Published on Jan 14, 2014

http://www.democracynow.org – The Freedom Industries site behind the West Virginia chemical spill is just a mile upriver from the state’s largest water treatment plant, owned by American Water. But despite the obvious dangers to the source of 16 percent of West Virginia resident’s water supply, the spill has exposed major holes in how the state regulates the dangerous chemicals used coal mining and processing, its leading industry. The chemical, 4-methylcyclohexanemethanol (Crude MCHM), does not receive close federal or state oversight. Environmental inspectors have not visited the Freedom Industries facility since 1991. Under West Virginia law, chemicals storage facilities are not even subject to inspections. The plant also had no groundwater protection plan in place. We speak with Mike Elk, a labor reporter for In These Times Magazine who has extensively covered chemical regulation in the United States, including at the West, Texas, fertilizer plant where 15 people died in an explosion last year. And we’re joined from West Virginia by Erin Brockovich, the renowned environmentalist and consumer advocate.

Environmental Justice
Environment Ethics

From the Farmer’s Field: Lacinato Kale


Food Farmer

Published on Jan 14, 2014

In this video, Cookbook author Ivy Manning, visits Shari Sirkin of Dancing Roots Farm, in Troutdale, Oregon, to investigate Kale from a farmer’s perspective. The sweet Lacinato kale is ready for winter harvest.

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Environmental Justice
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Food-Matters