Daily Archives: December 10, 2013

Canada to lay claim to north pole

TheGuardian

Published on Dec 10, 2013

Canada to lay claim to north pole

Subscribe to the Guardian HERE: http://bitly.com/UvkFpD

Canada plans to claim the north pole as part of a bid to assert control over a large part of the resource-rich Arctic. The country’s foreign affairs minister, John Baird, said the government had asked scientists to work on a future submission to the United Nations arguing that the outer limits of the country’s continental shelf include the pole

Click for full Guardian article:
http://www.theguardian.com/world/vide…

Global Climate Change.edu/~envre130
Environmental Justice http://courses.dce.harvard.edu/~envre145
Environment Ethics http://courses.dce.harvard.edu/~envre120

Polar Force: Putin orders Arctic military build-up in 2014


RT

Published on Dec 10, 2013

Russia will create forces in the Arctic in 2014 to ensure military security and protect the country’s national interests in the region, which President Vladimir Putin has named among the government’s top priorities. READ MORE: http://on.rt.com/kpqz0a

Global Climate Change http://courses.dce.harvard.edu/~envre130
Environmental Justice http://courses.dce.harvard.edu/~envre145
Environment Ethics http://courses.dce.harvard.edu/~envre120

Should U.S. Citizens Be Allowed To Shoot Down Drones? Colorado Town Postpones Vote!

MOXNEWSd0tC0M

Published on Dec 10, 2013

December 10, 2013 CNN

Global Climate Change http://courses.dce.harvard.edu/~envre130
Environmental Justice http://courses.dce.harvard.edu/~envre145
Environment Ethics http://courses.dce.harvard.edu/~envre120

Climate change causing wetlands to disappear in US

The US has an ecological problem. New research shows its wetlands are disappearing fast, putting wildlife and even the food chain at risk.&n…

Global Climate Change http://courses.dce.harvard.edu/~envre130
Environmental Justice http://courses.dce.harvard.edu/~envre145
Environment Ethics http://courses.dce.harvard.edu/~envre120

World of Spycraft: NSA and CIA Spied in Online Game

http://www.propublica.org/article/world-of-spycraft-intelligence-agencies-spied-in-online-games

Visitors play “World of Warcraft” at an exhibition stand during the Gamescom 2012 fair in Cologne, Germany. (Ina Fassbender/Reuters)

by Justin Elliott, ProPublica, and Mark Mazzetti, The New York Times, Dec. 9, 2013, 6:59 a.m.

Note: This story is not subject to our Creative Commons license.

This story has been reported in partnership between The New York Times, the Guardian and ProPublica based on documents obtained by The Guardian.

Not limiting their activities to the earthly realm, American and British spies have infiltrated the fantasy worlds of World of Warcraft and Second Life, conducting surveillance and scooping up data in the online games played by millions of people across the globe, according to newly disclosed classified documents.

Fearing that terrorist or criminal networks could use the games to communicate secretly, move money or plot attacks, the documents show, intelligence operatives have entered terrain populated by digital avatars that include elves, gnomes and supermodels.

The spies have created make-believe characters to snoop and to try to recruit informers, while also collecting data and contents of communications between players, according to the documents, disclosed by the former National Security Agency contractor Edward J. Snowden. Because militants often rely on features common to video games — fake identities, voice and text chats, a way to conduct financial transactions — American and British intelligence agencies worried that they might be operating there, according to the papers.

Takeaways: How Spy Agencies Operate In Virtual Worlds

GATHERING INTELLIGENCE: U.S. and British intelligence agencies — including the Central Intelligence Agency, Defense intelligence agency and Britain’s Government Communications Headquarters — have operated in virtual worlds and gaming communities to snoop and try to recruit informants. For example, according to Snowden documents, the U.S. has conducted spy operations in Second Life (pictured), where players create human avatars to socialize, buy and sell goods and explore exotic virtual destinations. (Second Life image via Linden Lab)

Slideshow: prev1 of 5 next

Online games might seem innocuous, a top-secret 2008 NSA document warned, but they had the potential to be a “target-rich communication network” allowing intelligence suspects “a way to hide in plain sight.” Virtual games “are an opportunity!,” another 2008 NSA document declared.

But for all their enthusiasm — so many CIA, FBI and Pentagon spies were hunting around in Second Life, the document noted, that a “deconfliction” group was needed to avoid collisions — the intelligence agencies may have inflated the threat.

The documents do not cite any counterterrorism successes from the effort, and former American intelligence officials, current and former gaming company employees and outside experts said in interviews that they knew of little evidence that terrorist groups viewed the games as havens to communicate and plot operations.

(Transcript: What are intelligence agencies doing in virtual worlds?)

Games “are built and operated by companies looking to make money, so the players’ identity and activity is tracked,” said Peter W. Singer of the Brookings Institution, an author of “Cybersecurity and Cyberwar: What Everyone Needs to Know.” “For terror groups looking to keep their communications secret, there are far more effective and easier ways to do so than putting on a troll avatar.”

….(read more).

Environmental Justice http://courses.dce.harvard.edu/~envre145
Environment Ethics http://courses.dce.harvard.edu/~envre120

Naomi Klein and Joseph Stiglitz on Economic Power


CUNYMedia

Uploaded on Nov 18, 2009

What is the role of the U.S. in the disposition of the world’s economic and environmental resources? How are financial markets best defended from economic shock? Does liberalization ensure prosperity?

Journalist Naomi Klein speaks with economists Joseph Stiglitz and Hernando de Soto in a conversation moderated by David Harvey, Distinguished Professor of Anthropology at the Graduate Center – City University of New York (CUNY)

Global Climate Change http://courses.dce.harvard.edu/~envre130
Environmental Justice http://courses.dce.harvard.edu/~envre145
Environment Ethics http://courses.dce.harvard.edu/~envre120

Neva Goodwin at MIT on “A New Economics for the 21st Century”


Efssociety

Streamed live on Feb 13, 2013

The New Economics Institute and New Economy @ MIT present a conversation with Neva Goodwin entitled “A New Economics for the 21st Century.” This is the 1st event in the New Economy @ MIT spring speaker series: “Building the New Economy”

Neva Goodwin is Co-Director of the Global Development And Environment Institute at Tufts University. She is the lead author of two introductory college-level textbooks: Microeconomics in Context and Macroeconomics in Context, published by M.E. Sharpe. These are the starting points for her endeavor to develop an economic theory— “contextual economics”—that will have more relevance to real-world concerns than does the dominant economic paradigm. Goodwin is also director of a project that has developed a “Social Science Library: Frontier Thinking in Sustainable Development and Human Well-Being.” Containing a bibliography of 10,000 titles, including full text PDFs of about a third of these, this material will be sent on USB drives or CDs to all university libraries in 137 developing countries. As a member of the board of Ceres and in other activities outside of her academic work, Goodwin is involved in efforts to motivate business to recognize social and ecological health as significant, long-term corporate goals.

Learn more about Neva Goodwin at the New Economy movement at www.neweconomicsinstitute.org.

Global Climate Change http://courses.dce.harvard.edu/~envre130
Environmental Justice http://courses.dce.harvard.edu/~envre145
Environment Ethics http://courses.dce.harvard.edu/~envre120