Daily Archives: December 4, 2013

Truck Containing Radioactive Medical Material Hijacked In Mexico!


MOXNEWSd0tC0M

Published on Dec 4, 2013

December 04, 2013 BBC News

Environmental Justice http://courses.dce.harvard.edu/~envre145
Environment Ethics http://courses.dce.harvard.edu/~envre120

Acidifying the Ocean: Assessing Impacts on Coral Reefs

University of California Television (UCTV)

Published on Dec 4, 2013

(Visit: http://www.uctv.tv/) Ocean acidification, the well-documented increase in ocean acidity resulting from increasing atmospheric carbon dioxide, poses threats to ocean ecosystems that are not yet fully understood. Join ocean chemist Andreas Andersson as he explains the basics of ocean acidification and how his research is allowing him to monitor the function and health of coral reef systems as the ocean changes. Series: “Perspectives on Ocean Science” [12/2013] [Science] [Show ID: 25709]

Global Climate Change http://courses.dce.harvard.edu/~envre130
Environment Ethics http://courses.dce.harvard.edu/~envre120

Vandana Shiva & Jane Goodall on Serving the Earth & How Women Can Address Climate Crisis

democracynow

Published on Dec 4, 2013

http://www.democracynow.org – At the recent International Women’s Earth and Climate Initiative Summit, Jane Goodall and Vandana Shiva discuss their decades of work devoted to protecting nature and saving future generations from the dangers of climate change. A renowned primatologist, Goodall is best known for her groundbreaking work with chimpanzees and baboons. An environmental leader, feminist and thinker, Shiva is the author of many books, including “Making Peace with the Earth: Beyond Resource, Land and Food Wars” and “Earth Democracy: Justice, Sustainability, and Peace.”

Watch Part 2 of this discussion:

Global Climate Change http://courses.dce.harvard.edu/~envre130
Environmental Justice http://courses.dce.harvard.edu/~envre145
Environment Ethics http://courses.dce.harvard.edu/~envre120
Food-Matters http://Food-Matters.TV

Arctic Warming – Decline of the Polar Bear


Journeyman Pictures

Published on Dec 4, 2013

Arctic Warming: The ice melt is increasing year upon year. Its side-effect according to scientists? The extinction of the polar bear…

For downloads and more information visit:
http://www.journeyman.tv/videopageont…

Global warming is affecting the Arctic twice as fast as the rest of the world, threatening the entire marine ecosystem.

Polar bears, seals and other species dependent on the ice could all face extinction. With the ice melting quickly in the feeding season, bears are being forced ashore early. Denied adequate feeding time, the bears arrive on shore much lighter than before, ill equipped for the long summer fast.

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Global Climate Change http://courses.dce.harvard.edu/~envre130
Environmental Justice http://courses.dce.harvard.edu/~envre145
Environment Ethics http://courses.dce.harvard.edu/~envre120

Pandora’s Promise – Trailer


Cinedigm

Published on Dec 4, 2013

Impact Partners presents Pandora’s Promise, the groundbreaking new film by Academy-Award nominated director Robert Stone. The atomic bomb and meltdowns like Fukushima have made nuclear power synonymous with global disaster. But what if we’ve got nuclear power wrong? An audience favorite at the Sundance Film Festival, Pandora’s Promise asks whether the one technology we fear most could save our planet from a climate catastrophe, while providing the energy needed to lift billions of people in the developing world out of poverty. In his controversial new film, Stone tells the intensely personal stories of environmentalists and energy experts who have undergone a radical conversion from being fiercely anti- to strongly pro-nuclear energy, risking their careers and reputations in the process. Stone exposes this controversy within the environmental movement head-on with stories of defection by heavyweights including Stewart Brand, Richard Rhodes, Gwyneth Cravens, Mark Lynas and Michael Shellenberger.

Global Climate Change http://courses.dce.harvard.edu/~envre130
Environmental Justice http://courses.dce.harvard.edu/~envre145
Environment Ethics http://courses.dce.harvard.edu/~envre120

India’s Negotiator Says Climate Treaty Talks ‘Partial Success’ – NYTimes.com

http://india.blogs.nytimes.com/2013/11/25/indias-negotiator-says-climate-treaty-talks-partial-success/
November 25, 2013, 5:51 am By BETWA SHARMA

Janek Skarzynski/Agence France-Presse — Getty Images A session in progress at the 19th conference of the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change in Warsaw, Poland, on Friday.

WARSAW, Poland — After more than 35 hours of continuous discussions, Ravi Shankar Prasad, one of India’s lead negotiators, described the United Nations climate change conference as “a partial success” for keeping the pathway open for a global climate treaty to be finalized in 2015.

Mr. Prasad said that after being on the verge of a breakdown, the talks, which concluded Saturday, delivered a mechanism for developed countries to give money to poor nations for climate-related “loss and damage” and created an outline for a system under which countries could make “contributions” to reduce greenhouse gas emissions after 2020, when the 1997 Kyoto Protocol, the first treaty on climate change, will end.

“Loss and damage is something African countries have been asking for 15 to 20 years. It was very close to their heart and so were keen on it,” Mr. Prasad told India Ink on Saturday night, as delegates of several countries rushed out of the National Stadium in Warsaw to catch their flights after the talks had been extended an entire day.

Last week, the failure to reach agreement over loss and damage had led to a walkout by the bloc of developing countries called G77 & China, which also includes India.

For itself, India sees any future money for losses and damages to be utilized for building sophisticated risk resilience mechanisms that warn against natural disasters.

But many environmental activists saw the 2013 talks as a bust since no specified amount or timeline has been set for rich countries to actually give the money for losses and damages, and neither is there a specific plan to capitalize the $100 billion Green Climate Fund, which will help developing nations adapt to climate change.

….(read more).

Global Climate Change http://courses.dce.harvard.edu/~envre130
Environmental Justice http://courses.dce.harvard.edu/~envre145
Environment Ethics http://courses.dce.harvard.edu/~envre120

Let Them Burn Coal – Bjorn Lomborg – NYTimes.com

http://www.nytimes.com/2013/12/05/opinion/let-them-burn-coal.html

By BJORN LOMBORG
Published: December 4, 2013

About 3.5 million of them die prematurely each year as a result of breathing the polluted air inside their homes — about 200,000 more than the number who die prematurely each year from breathing polluted air outside, according to a study by the World Health Organization.

There’s no question that burning fossil fuels is leading to a warmer climate and that addressing this problem is important. But doing so is a question of timing and priority. For many parts of the world, fossil fuels are still vital and will be for the next few decades, because they are the only means to lift people out of the smoke and darkness of energy poverty.

More than 1.2 billion people around the world have no access to electricity, according to the International Energy Agency’s World Energy Outlook for 2012. Most of them live in sub-Saharan Africa and in Asia. That is nearly four times the number of people who live in the United States. In sub-Saharan Africa, for instance, excluding South Africa, the entire electricity-generating capacity available is only 28 gigawatts — equivalent to Arizona’s — for 860 million people. About 6.5 million people live in Arizona.

Even more people — an estimated three billion — still cook and heat their homes using open fires and leaky stoves, according to the energy agency. More efficient stoves could help. And solar panels could provide LED lights and power to charge cellphones.

But let’s face it. What those living in energy poverty need are reliable, low-cost fossil fuels, at least until we can make a global transition to a greener energy future. This is not just about powering stoves and refrigerators to improve billions of lives but about powering agriculture and industry that will improve lives.

Over the last 30 years, China moved an estimated 680 million people out of poverty by giving them access to modern energy, mostly powered by coal. Yes, this has resulted in terrible air pollution and a huge increase in greenhouse gas emissions. But it is a trade-off many developing countries would gratefully choose. As China becomes wealthier, it will most likely begin to cut its air pollution problem through regulation, just as the rich world did in the 20th century. But, admittedly, cutting carbon-dioxide emissions will be much harder because these emissions are a byproduct of the cheap energy that makes the world go around.

Today, 81 percent of the planet’s energy needs are met by fossil fuels, and according to the International Energy Agency, that percentage will be almost as high in 2035 under current policies, when consumption will be much greater. The unfortunate fact is that many people feel uncomfortable facing up to the undeniable need for more cheap and reliable power in the developing world. The Obama administration announced recently, for instance, that it would no longer contribute to the construction of coal-fired power plants financed by the World Bank and other international development banks.

This should not have been a surprise. The last time the World Bank agreed to help finance construction of a coal-fired power plant, in South Africa in 2010, the United States abstained from a vote approving the deal. The Obama administration expressed concerns that the project would “produce significant greenhouse gas emissions.” But as South Africa’s finance minister, Pravin Gordhan, explained at the time in The Washington Post, “To sustain the growth rates we need to create jobs, we have no choice but to build new generating capacity — relying on what, for now, remains our most abundant and affordable energy source: coal.”

The developed world needs a smarter approach toward cleaner fuels. The United States has been showing the way. Hydraulic fracturing has produced an abundance of inexpensive natural gas, leading to a shift away from coal in electricity production. Because burning natural gas emits half the carbon dioxide of coal, this technology has helped the United States reduce carbon dioxide emissions to the lowest level since the mid-1990s, even as emissions rise globally. We need to export this technology and help other nations exploit it.

At the same time, wealthy Western nations must step up investments into research and development in green energy technologies to ensure that cleaner energy eventually becomes so cheap that everyone will want it.

But until then they should not stand in the way of poorer nations as they turn to coal and other fossil fuels. This approach will get our priorities right. And perhaps then, people will be able to cook in their own homes without slowly killing themselves.

Bjorn Lomborg is the director of the Copenhagen Consensus Center, a nonprofit group focused on cost-effective solutions to global problems, and the author of “The Skeptical Environmentalist.”

Global Climate Change http://courses.dce.harvard.edu/~envre130
Environmental Justice http://courses.dce.harvard.edu/~envre145
Environment Ethics http://courses.dce.harvard.edu/~envre120