Daily Archives: October 19, 2013

World Food Day: Cook Organic, Not the Planet

http://www.organicconsumers.org/articles/article_28529.cfm

“Here’s the single most important thing you need to know about the IPCC (Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change) report: It’s not too late. We still have time to do something about climate disruption. The best estimate from the best science is that we can limit warming from human-caused carbon pollution to less than 3.6 degrees Fahrenheit – if we act now. Bottom line: Our house is on fire. Rather than argue about how fast it’s burning, we need to start throwing buckets of water.” – Michael Brune, Director, Sierra Club, Sept. 27, 2013

Organic Bytes #399: Cooking the Planet & Exposing Dirty Money

http://www.organicconsumers.org/bytes/ob399.html

E120, e145, food-matters,

Sustainability and Religion: New Directions in Research and Practice

http://www.hds.harvard.edu/multimedia/video/sustainability-and-religion-new-directions-in-research-and-practice

HDS-Sustainability

04.02.2012

Runtime: 1:27:48

The HDS Green Team and the student group EcoDiv hosted the presentation and panel discussion “Sustainability and Religion: New Directions in Research and Practice” on April 2 in Andover Hall. Presenters included Timothy C. Weiskel, research director at Cambridge Climate Research Associates, and HDS Professors Susan Abraham, Dan McKanan, and Diane Moore.

Global Climate Change http://courses.dce.harvard.edu/~envre130
Environmental Justice http://courses.dce.harvard.edu/~envre145
Environment Ethics http://courses.dce.harvard.edu/~envre120

Sallie McFague – Cities, Climate Change, and Christianity: Religion and Sustainable Urbanism

http://www.hds.harvard.edu/multimedia/video/cities-climate-change-and-christianity-religion-and-sustainable-urbanism-0

The Harvard Divinity School 2009-10 Dudleian Lecture

Sally-McFague

10.28.2009

A presentation by Sallie McFague, Distinguished Theologian in Residence, Vancouver School of Theology, formerly Carpenter Professor of Theology at Vanderbilt Divinity School, and a leader in linking ecofeminism and Christian theology. A response was given by David Lamberth, Professor of Philosophy and Theology, Harvard Divinity School. This event was the Harvard Divinity School 2009-10 Dudleian Lecture and the second lecture in the 2009-10 CSWR Ecologies of Human Flourishing series.

For text see: Sallie McFague – Cities, Climate Change, and Christianity | Harvard Divinity Bulletin

Environmental Justice http://courses.dce.harvard.edu/~envre145
Environment Ethics http://courses.dce.harvard.edu/~envre120

Bill McKibben – Reality Check: How the Facts of Life on a Tough New Planet Shape Our Choices

http://www.hds.harvard.edu/multimedia/video/reality-check-how-the-facts-of-life-on-a-tough-new-planet-shape-our-choices
03.08.2010

HDS-McKibben

A presentation by Bill McKibben, scholar in residence at Middlebury College and American environmentalist and writer who frequently writes about global warming, alternative energy, and the risks associated with human genetic engineering. A response was given by Daniel Schrag, Professor of Earth and Planetary Sciences and director of the Harvard University Center for the Environment. Part of the 2009-10 Ecologies of Human Flourishing lecture series.

Global Climate Change http://courses.dce.harvard.edu/~envre130
Environmental Justice http://courses.dce.harvard.edu/~envre145
Environment Ethics http://courses.dce.harvard.edu/~envre120

Sallie McFague – Cities, Climate Change, and Christianity | Harvard Divinity Bulletin

http://www.hds.harvard.edu/news-events/harvard-divinity-bulletin/articles/cities-climate-change-and-christianity

Winter/Spring 2010 (Vol. 38, Nos. 1 & 2)

Well-off city dwellers need to say ‘enough.’

Sallie McFague

In the 2007 United Nations report on climate change, the overall assessment was “unequivocal” confidence that global warming is underway and 90 percent certainty that human activities are the cause. However, recent updates of the 2007 report spell out a more daunting scenario. The worst-case projections are being realized, leading to an increasing risk for abrupt and irreversible climatic shifts. In other words, the dreaded tipping point is now a realistic possibility. In December 2009, the world leaders gathered in Copenhagen to devise an international treaty that must surely be one of the most complicated and difficult ever attempted.

The twin of climate change—the economic meltdown—also faces us. These two are the product of the same insatiable desire for more: more money, more energy. Uncontrolled greed underlies both of these planetary disasters. Thomas Friedman, writing in The New York Times last spring, put it this way:

What if the crisis of 2008 represents something much more fundamental than a deep recession? What if it’s telling us that the whole growth model we created over the last 50 years is simply unsustainable economically and ecologically and that 2008 was when we hit the wall—when Mother Nature and the market both said: “No more.” What if we face up to the fact that unlike the U.S. government, Mother Nature doesn’t do bailouts?1

There are many needed responses to such news, but here I will attempt just one—an exercise in “thinking differently” about nature, our place in it, and particularly urbanized nature. Most human beings of the twenty-first century will live in cities, and cities are where half of the world’s greenhouse gases are generated. What is the relationship between cities and nature, and how can we achieve sustainable cities?

….(read more).

Global Climate Change http://courses.dce.harvard.edu/~envre130
Environmental Justice http://courses.dce.harvard.edu/~envre145
Environment Ethics http://courses.dce.harvard.edu/~envre120

“A GIANT ASTEROID HEADING TOWARDS EARTH!”

MOXNEWSd0tC0M

Published on Oct 18, 2013

October 18, 2013 CNN

Global Climate Change http://courses.dce.harvard.edu/~envre130
Environmental Justice http://courses.dce.harvard.edu/~envre145
Environment Ethics http://courses.dce.harvard.edu/~envre120