Daily Archives: October 17, 2013

Three southern states battle for water

E120, e130, water

WHO: Air pollution leading cause of cancer

It’s not just the South: Water wars throughout the US

E145, e130, e120,

Faultlines- Evangelizing the Military


timjbd

Uploaded on Sep 16, 2009

We examine the influx of Evangelical chaplains in the US military and what that means for the military in general here and abroad.

Part 2:

Global Climate Change http://courses.dce.harvard.edu/~envre130
Environmental Justice http://courses.dce.harvard.edu/~envre145
Environment Ethics http://courses.dce.harvard.edu/~envre120

The projected timing of climate departure from recent variability

http://www.nature.com/nature/journal/v502/n7470/full/nature12540.html

See news stories:

Climate change gets clocked : Nature News & Comment

and Climate Change – We Now Know The Point of No Return

Nature, 502, 183–187, (10 October 2013) doi: 10.1038/nature12540 Received 25 April 2013 Accepted 06 August 2013 Published online 09 October 2013

Abstract

Ecological and societal disruptions by modern climate change are critically determined by the time frame over which climates shift beyond historical analogues. Here we present a new index of the year when the projected mean climate of a given location moves to a state continuously outside the bounds of historical variability under alternative greenhouse gas emissions scenarios. Using 1860 to 2005 as the historical period, this index has a global mean of 2069 (±18 years s.d.) for near-surface air temperature under an emissions stabilization scenario and 2047 (±14 years s.d.) under a ‘business-as-usual’ scenario. Unprecedented climates will occur earliest in the tropics and among low-income countries, highlighting the vulnerability of global biodiversity and the limited governmental capacity to respond to the impacts of climate change. Our findings shed light on the urgency of mitigating greenhouse gas emissions if climates potentially harmful to biodiversity and society are to be prevented.

(read more).

Global Climate Change http://courses.dce.harvard.edu/~envre130
Environmental Justice http://courses.dce.harvard.edu/~envre145
Environment Ethics http://courses.dce.harvard.edu/~envre120
Food-Matters http://Food-Matters.TV

Climate change gets clocked : Nature News & Comment

http://www.nature.com/news/climate-change-gets-clocked-1.13922

Within 35 years, global average temperatures will be hotter than historical extremes.

09 October 2013

Tropical coral reefs will be among the first ecosystems to shift to a climate hotter than any conditions of the past 150 years.

Keoki Stender/marinelifephotography.com

The Indonesian city of Manokwari is poised to become an unwitting icon for climate change. In about 2020, the coastal location will become one of the first places in recent history to adopt an entirely new climate — one in which its coldest years will be consistently hotter than any of the past 150 years.

That is one finding of a study published today in Nature1, which attempts to create a region-specific index of climate change. Researchers sought to identify the point at which temperature oscillations in each area will exceed the bounds of historical variability. Such ‘climate departures’ are predicted to start in the tropics and then spread to higher latitudes. If carbon dioxide emissions continue unabated, Earth’s mean climate could depart from historical averages in 2047.

“Very soon, extreme events will become the norm,” says lead author Camilo Mora, an environmental researcher at the University of Hawaii at Manoa.

Because temperatures in the tropics vary little between seasons, even a slight increase in the average temperature could lead to unprecedented conditions — with negative consequences for ecosystems that are home to much of the world’s biodiversity. Many tropical nations also have limited economic capacity to adapt or otherwise respond to such threats.

“The rules of the climate game — those governing everything from species interactions to frequency of large storm events — are changing,” says Jack Williams, a palaeoclimatologist at the University of Wisconsin–Madison, who was not involved in the study.

…(read more).

Global Climate Change http://courses.dce.harvard.edu/~envre130
Environmental Justice http://courses.dce.harvard.edu/~envre145
Environment Ethics http://courses.dce.harvard.edu/~envre120

Climate Change – We Now Know The Point of No Return


TheBigPictureRT

Published on Oct 11, 2013

Scientists have now found a way to predict when we’ve reached the global warming point-of-no-return. So – isn’t time we started talking about the “E” word – extinction?

View film: Last Hours   and see:  http://lasthours.org  and Nature journal article.

Global Climate Change http://courses.dce.harvard.edu/~envre130
Environmental Justice http://courses.dce.harvard.edu/~envre145
Environment Ethics http://courses.dce.harvard.edu/~envre120
Food-Matters http://Food-Matters.TV