Daily Archives: August 27, 2013

Shale Oil – The Rush for Black Gold – 11.20.2011

energynownews

Uploaded on Nov 19, 2011

One of America’s biggest energy challenges is foreign oil dependency. The U.S. imports about half the oil it uses, putting the nation’s energy security at risk and costing hundreds of billions of dollars per year. New drilling innovations are unlocking vast new reserves and boosting local economies. But is the new drilling also forcing a tough choice between oil and water in drought-stricken Texas? This week, energyNOW! explores the latest U.S. oil boom.

Black Gold From Shale Rock
The combination of horizontal drilling and hydraulic fracturing in shale rock formations is opening up previously unrecoverable oil, just as those technologies did for natural gas. It’s driving a boom in U.S. energy production and creating bright spots in a tough economy across America.

Correspondent Patty Kim visits Williston, North Dakota, the site of America’s largest shale oil field and heart of the new oil rush, to check out life in an oil boom town.

Is The Oil Boom Worsening The Texas Drought?

Texas is home to America’s second largest shale oil field, and business is booming – production has skyrocketed from under 1,000 barrels a day in 2004 to more than 8 million so far in 2011. But hydraulic fracturing in shale rock requires millions of gallons of water, a precious resource during one of the worst droughts in the state’s history.

Anchor Thalia Assuras visits the Eagle Ford shale in Texas to see how rapidly expanding water use by energy companies is impacting the state.

Interview: EPA Administrator Lisa Jackson

Fracking operations may be competing for water supplies in Texas, but they have also raised concerns about water safety in other parts of the country.

Anchor Thalia Assuras sits down for a one-on-one interview with Environmental Protection Agency Administrator Lisa Jackson to discuss pressing energy and environmental issues, including fracking.

Global Climate Change http://courses.dce.harvard.edu/~envre130
Environmental Justice http://courses.dce.harvard.edu/~envre145
Environment Ethics http://courses.dce.harvard.edu/~envre120

BBC News – Fukushima leak is ‘much worse than we were led to believe’

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/science-environment-23779561
22 August 2013 Last updated at 05:32 ET
By Matt McGrath Environment correspondent, BBC News

Rupert Wingfield-Hayes travels to the source of the water being contaminated by Fukushima

Related Stories

A nuclear expert has told the BBC that he believes the current water leaks at Fukushima are much worse than the authorities have stated.

Mycle Schneider is an independent consultant who has previously advised the French and German governments.

He says water is leaking out all over the site and there are no accurate figures for radiation levels.

Meanwhile the chairman of Japan’s nuclear authority said that he feared there would be further leaks.

The ongoing problems at the Fukushima plant increased in recent days when the Tokyo Electric Power Company (Tepco) admitted that around 300 tonnes of highly radioactive water had leaked from a storage tank on the site.

Moment of crisis

The Japanese nuclear energy watchdog raised the incident level from one to three on the international scale that measures the severity of atomic accidents.

“It is leaking out from the basements, it is leaking out from the cracks all over the place”

Mycle Schneider Nuclear consultant

This was an acknowledgement that the power station was in its greatest crisis since the reactors melted down after the tsunami in 2011.

Global Climate Change http://courses.dce.harvard.edu/~envre130
Environmental Justice http://courses.dce.harvard.edu/~envre145
Environment Ethics http://courses.dce.harvard.edu/~envre120

Vermont Yankee Nuclear Plant To Close | WBUR

http://www.wbur.org/2013/08/27/vermont-yankee-to-close
y Dave Gram August 27, 2013

 

In this June 19, 2013 photo, the Vermont Yankee nuclear power plant sits along the banks of the Connecticut River in Vernon, Vt. (Toby Talbot/AP)

MONTPELIER, Vt. — Vermont’s only nuclear power plant will shut down by the end of next year, ending a nasty legal battle over the future of the 4-decade-old plant, Entergy Corp. announced Tuesday.

The Vermont Yankee Nuclear Power Station is expected to cease power production after its current fuel cycle and will begin being decommissioned in the fourth quarter of 2014, the company said. The station will remain under the oversight of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission throughout the decommissioning process.

The New Orleans-based company has been battling with the state since 2010, when the Vermont Senate voted against a measure that would have authorized a state board to grant Vermont Yankee a permit to operate for an additional 20 years. Lawmakers were concerned about the plant’s safety, age and misstatements by plant management about components at the reactor.

….(read more).

Global Climate Change http://courses.dce.harvard.edu/~envre130
Environmental Justice http://courses.dce.harvard.edu/~envre145
Environment Ethics http://courses.dce.harvard.edu/~envre120
Nuclear

When Will This Be Over? Fukushima Leaks Are Getting Worse

http://www.cctvcambridge.org/node/182082

Fukushima’s nuclear disaster is not “over.” In fact, it is getting worse and will not be over for generations and centuries to come.

Posted by CCRA on Aug 27, 2013.

Global Climate Change http://courses.dce.harvard.edu/~envre130
Environmental Justice http://courses.dce.harvard.edu/~envre145
Environment Ethics http://courses.dce.harvard.edu/~envre120
Nuclear.

Vermont Yankee To Close

http://radioboston.wbur.org/2013/08/27/vermont-yankee-to-close
August 27, 2013

This is an undated file photo shows aerial view of the Vermont Yankee nuclear power plant in Vernon, Vt. (AP)

Anti-nuclear power activists have been protesting the Vermont Yankee nuclear power plant since it was built in 1972. There have been marches, pickets, and sit-ins. The legislature voted to close it. The courts got involved. Attorneys racked up lots of billable hours.

Today, Entergy, the company that owns Vermont Yankee, announced that it will close the state’s lone nuclear facility. But not because of the climate. Or politics. Or the legal costs.

The cause was natural gas. Specifically, a glut of natural gas flooding the country’s energy market that priced the aging Vermont Yankee right out of business.

You can read Entergy’s statement on Vermont Yankee here.

Guests

Peter Shumlin, governor of Vermont.

Global Climate Change http://courses.dce.harvard.edu/~envre130
Environmental Justice http://courses.dce.harvard.edu/~envre145
Environment Ethics http://courses.dce.harvard.edu/~envre120

BBC News – Mexico mudslides and flash flooding kill 14

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-latin-america-23848232
27 August 2013 Last updated at 05:55 ET

Fernand made landfall near the Atlantic port city of Veracruz on Monday

Related Stories

More than a dozen people have died in eastern Mexico, in landslides triggered by heavy rain caused by tropical depression Fernand.

Thirteen people were killed when mud engulfed their homes on hillsides in Veracruz state.

Another man drowned after being swept away by fast-flowing floodwaters in neighbouring Oaxaca.

Fernand made landfall near the Atlantic port city of Veracruz on Monday and weakened as it moved north-west.

Veracruz Governor Javier Duarte has asked the federal government to declare an emergency in 92 municipalities, so they can receive recovery funds.

Global Climate Change http://courses.dce.harvard.edu/~envre130
Environmental Justice http://courses.dce.harvard.edu/~envre145
Environment Ethics http://courses.dce.harvard.edu/~envre120

Is Geoengineering a Silver Bullet for Climate Change?

http://desmogblog.com/2013/08/20/geoengineering-silver-bullet-climate-change
This is a guest post by David Suzuki.

Altering environments to suit our needs is not new. From clearing land to building dams, we’ve done it throughout history. When our technologies and populations were limited, our actions affected small areas – though with some cascading effects on interconnected ecosystems.

We’ve now entered an era in which humans are a geological force. According to the website Welcome to the Anthropocene, “There are now so many of us, using so many resources, that we’re disrupting the grand cycles of biology, chemistry and geology by which elements like carbon and nitrogen circulate between land, sea and atmosphere. We’re changing the way water moves around the globe as never before. Almost all the planet’s ecosystems bear the marks of our presence.” (read more)

Global Climate Change http://courses.dce.harvard.edu/~envre130
Environmental Justice http://courses.dce.harvard.edu/~envre145
Environment Ethics http://courses.dce.harvard.edu/~envre120