Daily Archives: August 19, 2013

The Koch Brothers & Climate Coverage – Union of Concerned Scientists

Climate Change Coverage Is Not for Sale

The Koch brothers want to use their vast oil, coal, and natural gas wealth to buy up our newspapers, and that is bad news for clean energy and climate change coverage.First up on the Koch’s wish list: Tribune Company newspapers read by millions daily, including the Baltimore Sun, Chicago Tribune, Hartford Courant, Los Angeles Times, Orlando Sentinel, and South Florida Sun Sentinel.

We need strong independent journalism that focuses on the facts about climate change and renewable energy, not more fossil fuel fiction.

As a new UCS investigation shows, a number of Koch-funded climate contrarians are the same corporate front groups that Big Tobacco used to mislead the public about the dangers of smoking. How do we know? We have their playbook.

The media has a big role to play in exposing this kind of disinformation, and that job will not get any easier if the Koch brothers get their way.

Tell the Tribune Company not to sell out to the Koch brothers.

Please make your letter personal by adding in your own thoughts and concerns. Every letter makes a difference, but customized letters have the greatest effect!

For more information, see our recent media analysis Unreliable Sources: How the News Media Help the Koch Brothers and ExxonMobil Spread Climate Disinformation.

 

Seeds of violence in climate change

http://news.harvard.edu/gazette/story/2013/08/in-climate-flux-seeds-of-war/

Uruguay holds lessons for avoiding conflict, scholar says

August 15, 2013 | Popular

By Alvin Powell, Harvard Staff Writer

This is the second in a series of stories about Harvard’s engagement in Latin America.

When Nathan Black considers the potential global consequences of climate change, one thing he sees is war.

Black, the French Environmental Fellow at the Harvard University Center for the Environment, is spending two years investigating the connection between changing agricultural conditions — specifically the supply of agricultural land — and civil war.

He is examining the cases of two nations, Haiti and Mexico, where shifts in the supply of agricultural land sparked violent conflict. He is also looking at Uruguay, which avoided conflict despite similar conditions in the late 1980s and early 1990s, to understand how violence was averted.

“What I’m looking at is, ‘What did Uruguay do that Haiti and Mexico failed to do?’” Black said. “What is the playbook?”

Black, who earned a bachelor’s degree from Rice University and a doctorate from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, became interested in conflict as a field of study as an undergraduate, but focused on interstate conflict. When he entered MIT for his doctoral work, a colleague’s investigation of civil wars piqued his curiosity.

Far less has been written about civil conflict than clashing nations, he said, which leaves many interesting questions still to be answered. His doctoral dissertation was about developing civil conflicts spilling across borders. He also began thinking about his current topic, and in 2010 published an article on how changes in the supply of arable land can fuel civil war. Black was a pre-doctoral fellow at Harvard’s Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs before graduating from MIT in 2012.

….(read more).

Global Climate Change http://courses.dce.harvard.edu/~envre130
Environmental Justice http://courses.dce.harvard.edu/~envre145
Environment Ethics http://courses.dce.harvard.edu/~envre120
Food-Matters http://Food-Matters.TV

The Politics of Power – MSNBC

http://tv.msnbc.com/politics-of-power-hayes/

#PoliticsofPower: The Politics of Climate Change,
hosted by Chris Hayes


msnbcleanforward

Streamed live on Aug 15, 2013

In his upcoming MSNBC documentary, “The Politics of Power,” Chris Hayes declares: “Climate change is a problem without borders; and developing countries are feeling the heat even more than the first world.” According to a Stanford University report, the planet is undergoing one of the largest climate changes in 65 million years.

The documentary begins after Hurricane Sandy, the 2012 super storm that left at least 147 dead and $65 billion in damages along the east coast of the United States. Affected areas are still digging their way out of the economic and emotional hole brought on by the storm. But was Sandy an aberration? Or should we expect severe storms like Sandy to recur?

The answer is—yes. Without immediate intervention, extreme weather is predicted to continue and even worsen, the documentary reports. Last year was already the hottest year ever recorded for the continental United States, according to the National Climatic Data Center at National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA),

Be sure to tune in to “The Politics of Power” to hear Hayes give a comprehensive breakdown of the destructive and unalterable path we’re headed down, and how politicians and large corporations have politicized the issue.

Hayes urges everyone to act quickly: “The price for politics as usual is just too high, our timeline too short…The solution to global warming is just that—global.”Tune in to “The Politics of Power,” narrated by Chris Hayes on August 16th at 8 p.m. ET on MSNBC.

Visit NBCNews.com for breaking news, world news, and news about the economy

Global Climate Change http://courses.dce.harvard.edu/~envre130
Environmental Justice http://courses.dce.harvard.edu/~envre145
Environment Ethics http://courses.dce.harvard.edu/~envre120

Climate reality must win out over political attacks on science

http://tv.msnbc.com/2013/08/15/climate-reality-must-win-out-over-political-attacks-on-science/
Brenda Ekwurzel 1:21 PM on 08/15/2013

See: http://ucsusa.org/disinformationplaybook

This summer’s heat has been brutal. A surprisingly early June heat wave broke records in the Western United States. The heat sent people to emergency rooms and stoked wildfires that destroyed homes and lives. Europe and Asia have suffered recent dangerous heat waves, too. Wildfire season in the U.S. West—fueled by extreme heat and water stress—is nearly two months longer than in the 1970s.

Extreme events like these are becoming more common. A recent report, pegged 2012 as one of the top-ten hottest years on record. That year, minimum Arctic summer sea-ice shrank to a new record low. I’ll never forget seeing vast areas of open water at the North Pole in September while collecting samples for my research years ago. There’s far less ice there now at the end of Arctic summer season.

Scientists already see that people are suffering from the heat-trapping emissions in our atmosphere. But when I talk to people about this, many don’t always accept the science. It’s likely because they’ve heard so many conflicting messages about climate change online or in the media. That’s no mistake. The fossil fuel industry borrowed a political playbook from the tobacco industry before them: When scientists discover that your products are risky, attack the science.My first personal experience with the disinformation campaign was about seven years ago. A radio program interviewed me along with someone from a fossil-fuel-funded group. At one point, I heard him say something that was not supported by peer-reviewed science. He said he had read scientific papers that made his case. Naturally, I asked him what papers he was talking about: Who were the authors? Where was their research published?

He refused to answer, even though he also claimed he was holding the papers right in front of him.

…(read more).

Global Climate Change http://courses.dce.harvard.edu/~envre130
Environmental Justice http://courses.dce.harvard.edu/~envre145
Environment Ethics http://courses.dce.harvard.edu/~envre120

Bill McKibben – Founder, 350.org

http://350.org/bill

Bill McKibben – Founder, 350.org

Summary

Bill McKibben is an author, environmentalist, and activist. In 1988, he wrote The End of Nature, the first book for a common audience about global warming. He is the co-founder and Chairman of the Board at 350.org, an international climate campaign that works in 188 countries around the world.

Global Climate Change http://courses.dce.harvard.edu/~envre130
Environmental Justice http://courses.dce.harvard.edu/~envre145
Environment Ethics http://courses.dce.harvard.edu/~envre120