Daily Archives: July 19, 2013

Genetic Roulette: The Gamble of our Lives

E120, food-matters,

Blind Spot (Official Trailer)

Cinetic

Uploaded on Apr 14, 2009

Blind Spot is a documentary that illustrates the current energy crisis that our way of life is facing. Whatever the measures of greed, wishful thinking, neglect or ignorance, we have put ourselves at a crossroad which offers two paths, both with dire consequences. If we continue to burn fossil fuels we will choke the life out of the planet and if we don’t our way of life will collapse.

Global Climate Change http://courses.dce.harvard.edu/~envre130
Environmental Justice http://courses.dce.harvard.edu/~envre145
Environment Ethics http://courses.dce.harvard.edu/~envre120

Japan portable farm heads for Qatar

AlJazeeraEnglish

Uploaded on Mar 18, 2010

A high-tech portable vegetable farm designed and built in Japan will soon be heading to Qatar.

The innovative project is part of an effort by the desert gulf state to find ways to tackle its food security problem and grow more at home.

Al Jazeera’s Harry Fawcett reports from Tokyo.

Environment Ethics http://courses.dce.harvard.edu/~envre120
Food-Matters http://Food-Matters.TV

Al Bartlett interview from Blind Spot documentary


human4832

Uploaded on Jan 12, 2009

Al Bartlett interview from Blind Spot documentary movie (2008).

From the DVD cover: “Blind Spot is a documentary that illustrates the current energy crisis that our way of life is facing. Whatever the measures of greed, wishful thinking, neglect or ignorance, we have put ourselves at a crossroad which offers two paths, both with dire consequences. If we continue to burn fossil fuels we will choke the life out of the planet and if we don’t our way of life will collapse.”

The movie Blind Spot can be purchased at Film Baby for approximately $16.00 US: http://www.filmbaby.com/films/3368 .

See more information, excerpts and trailers at the official website: BlindSpotDoc.com, http://www.blindspotdoc.com .

Interview segment reproduced with permission of the producer.

Environmental Justice http://courses.dce.harvard.edu/~envre145
Environment Ethics http://courses.dce.harvard.edu/~envre120

Zapatista’s Land Dispute


Journeyman Pictures

Uploaded on Mar 3, 2011

April 1994. Mexico’s Indian population is demanding a better life. Masked Zappatistas rebels meet government officials in San Cristobal Town Hall. Zappatista leader Marcos sits quietly to one side smoking his trademark pipe. Land is the core of the dispute which has seen rising tension among indigenous Mexican Indians. In the Chiapas mountains Indian villagers tell of the torture and disappearance of three local elders. We go into the forest and film the discovery of their bodies. Friends take photographs of the men in happier days to their distraught wives. In Altamirano the military presence fills every street. Tanks and guns advertise the might of the government should the Zappatistas demand too much. Some of the poorest Indians take up the fight and camp outside San Cristobal’s town hall; they graffiti its walls with their grievances. Chiapas is divided, military roadblocks restrict daily life.

Environmental Justice http://courses.dce.harvard.edu/~envre145
Environment Ethics http://courses.dce.harvard.edu/~envre120
Food-Matters http://Food-Matters.TV

Chiapas and NAFTA Documentary Film


The Film Archives

Published on Aug 9, 2012

The preparations for NAFTA included cancellation of Article 27 of Mexico’s constitution, the cornerstone of Emiliano Zapata’s revolution of 1910–1919. Under the historic Article 27, Indian communal landholdings were protected from sale or privatization. But under NAFTA this guarantee was defined as a barrier to investment. With the removal of Article 27, Indian farmers would be threatened with loss of their remaining lands, and also flooded with cheap imports (substitutes) from the US. Thus, the Zapatistas labeled NAFTA as a “death sentence” to Indian communities all over Mexico. Then EZLN declared war on the Mexican state on January 1, 1994, the day NAFTA came into force.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/North_Am…

Chiapas (Spanish pronunciation: [ˈtʃjapas]), officially Free and Sovereign State of Chiapas (Spanish: Estado Libre y Soberano de Chiapas), is one of the 31 states that, with the Federal District, comprise the 32 Federal Entities of Mexico. It is divided into 118 municipalities and its capital city is Tuxtla Gutiérrez. Other important cites in Chiapas include San Cristóbal de las Casas, Comitán, and Tapachula. Located in Southwestern Mexico, it is the southernmost State of Mexico. It is bordered by the states of Tabasco to the north, Veracruz to the northwest and Oaxaca to the west. To the east Chiapas borders Guatemala, and to the south the Pacific Ocean.

In general, Chiapas has a humid, tropical climate. In the north, in the area bordering Tabasco, near Teapa, rainfall can average more than 3,000 mm (120 in) per year. In the past, natural vegetation at this region was lowland, tall perennial rainforest, but this vegetation has been destroyed almost completely to give way to agriculture and ranching. Rainfall decreases moving towards the Pacific Ocean, but it is still abundant enough to allow the farming of bananas and many other tropical crops near Tapachula. On the several parallel “sierras” or mountain ranges running along the center of Chiapas, climate can be quite temperate and foggy, allowing the development of cloud forests like those of the Reserva de la Biosfera el Triunfo, home to a handful of Resplendent Quetzals and Horned Guans.

Chiapas is home to the ancient Mayan ruins of Palenque, Yaxchilán, Bonampak, and Chinkultic. It is also home to one of the largest indigenous populations in the country with twelve federally recognized ethnicities. Much of the state’s history is centered on the subjugation of these peoples with occasional rebellions. The last of these rebellions was the 1994 Zapatista uprising, which succeeded in obtaining new rights for indigenous people but also divided much of the indigenous peoples of the state.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chiapas

Environmental Justice http://courses.dce.harvard.edu/~envre145
Environment Ethics http://courses.dce.harvard.edu/~envre120

Induced Seismicity Potential in Energy Technologies


nationalacademies

Published on Jul 19, 2013

This video explains the conditions that have produced some small manmade earthquakes during various energy production activities, including conventional oil and gas, hydraulic fracturing, geothermal energy, and the injection of wastewater for underground disposal. The video also explores the potential for earthquakes to develop from use of new energy technologies such as carbon capture and storage. The information is based upon the National Research Council report, Induced Seismicity Potential in Energy Technologies.

Environmental Justice http://courses.dce.harvard.edu/~envre145
Environment Ethics http://courses.dce.harvard.edu/~envre120