Daily Archives: July 8, 2013

When The levees broke part 1 (2006)


Willie Woods

Published on Jun 24, 2012

When the Levees Broke: A Requiem in Four Acts: An examination of the U.S. government’s role and its response to Hurricane Katrina.

Link for Part 2

Global Climate Change http://courses.dce.harvard.edu/~envre130
Environmental Justice http://courses.dce.harvard.edu/~envre145
Environment Ethics http://courses.dce.harvard.edu/~envre120

NOVA – Hurricane Katrina The Storm That Drowned A City


converrlMD161

Published on Aug 29, 2012

Global Climate Change http://courses.dce.harvard.edu/~envre130
Environmental Justice http://courses.dce.harvard.edu/~envre145
Environment Ethics http://courses.dce.harvard.edu/~envre120

Katrina – What Went Wrong – Dateline (Sep 9 05)

YourUSACountry

Uploaded on Aug 21, 2011

DATELINE SHOW about the Hurricane Storm Katrina and what went wrong.

F.E.M.A. should not be a part of Homeland Security and have someone EXPERIENCED operating over it. Watch the whole show again. Learn how the Sheriffs office was used in having states rights power over the Federal Government. If you want to watch the video later, and keep a copy for your own use, use www.keepvid.com and save as a Mp4 or whatever you prefer your player uses.

Global Climate Change http://courses.dce.harvard.edu/~envre130
Environmental Justice http://courses.dce.harvard.edu/~envre145
Environment Ethics http://courses.dce.harvard.edu/~envre120

Tourism on Trial – Egypt


Journeyman Pictures

Published on Nov 26, 2012

For downloads and more information visit: http://www.journeyman.tv/?lid=64608

In Egypt security problems have collapsed the tourism industry, one of the cornerstones of its economy. As radical Islamists push for strict regulations on tourists, Egypt’s population is struggling.

“Before the revolution, we used to get ten buses here every hour,” a stall keeper sighs. The lack of tourist business has afflicted over 3.5 million people who depend on the traffic for their income. But while they had hoped that the end of the revolution would bring tourists back, there is now another threat looming on the horizon. It may sound bizarre, but the radical Islamist Salafists believe that tourists should only be able to see the pyramids through a veil of wax, arguing “there is a religious decree against keeping them as they are”. Unfortunately for the tourist industry, they hold 25% of the seats in the new democratically elected parliament. Under the Salafists public displays of affection would also be banned, as would men and women swimming together. In fact, their decrees would probably force Egypt’s most famous beach resort, Sharm El Sheik, to close down. But as tour operator Abdis Salaam says, those in the industry are braced for a fight: “We will stand up against them. We are prepared to create a new revolution if our livelihood is affected.”

Global Climate Change http://courses.dce.harvard.edu/~envre130
Environmental Justice http://courses.dce.harvard.edu/~envre145
Environment Ethics http://courses.dce.harvard.edu/~envre120

Global threat to food supply as water wells dry up, warns top environment expert

http://www.guardian.co.uk/global-development/2013/jul/06/food-supply-threat-water-wells-dry-up

Wells in dry areas.

Lester Brown says grain harvests are already shrinking as US, India and China come close to ‘peak water’

, environment editor The Observer, Saturday 6 July 2013 09.24 EDT

Iraq is among the countries in the Middle East facing severe water shortages. Photograph: Ali al-Saadi/AFP

Wells are drying up and underwater tables falling so fast in the Middle East and parts of India, China and the US that food supplies are seriously threatened, one of the world’s leading resource analysts has warned.

In a major new essay Lester Brown, head of the Earth Policy Institute in Washington, claims that 18 countries, together containing half the world’s people, are now overpumping their underground water tables to the point – known as “peak water” – where they are not replenishing and where harvests are getting smaller each year.

The situation is most serious in the Middle East. According to Brown: “Among the countries whose water supply has peaked and begun to decline are Saudi Arabia, Syria, Iraq and Yemen. By 2016 Saudi Arabia projects it will be importing some 15m tonnes of wheat, rice, corn and barley to feed its population of 30 million people. It is the first country to publicly project how aquifer depletion will shrink its grain harvest.

“The world is seeing the collision between population growth and water supply at the regional level. For the first time in history, grain production is dropping in a geographic region with nothing in sight to arrest the decline. Because of the failure of governments in the region to mesh population and water policies, each day now brings 10,000 more people to feed and less irrigation water with which to feed them.”

Brown warns that Syria’s grain production peaked in 2002 and since then has dropped 30%; Iraq has dropped its grain production 33% since 2004; and production in Iran dropped 10% between 2007 and 2012 as its irrigation wells started to go dry.

“Iran is already in deep trouble. It is feeling the effects of shrinking water supplies from overpumping. Yemen is fast becoming a hydrological basket case. Grain production has fallen there by half over the last 35 years. By 2015 irrigated fields will be a rarity and the country will be importing virtually all of its grain.”

Running Low

There is also concern about falling water tables in China, India and the US, the world’s three largest food-producing countries. “In India, 175 million people are being fed with grain produced by overpumping, in China 130 million. In the United States the irrigated area is shrinking in leading farm states with rapid population growth, such as California and Texas, as aquifers are depleted and irrigation water is diverted to cities.”

Falling water tables are already adversely affecting harvest prospects in China, which rivals the US as the world’s largest grain producer, says Brown. “The water table under the North China Plain, an area that produces more than half of the country’s wheat and a third of its maize is falling fast. Overpumping has largely depleted the shallow aquifer, forcing well drillers to turn to the region’s deep aquifer, which is not replenishable.”   ….(read more).

Global Climate Change   http://courses.dce.harvard.edu/~envre130
Environmental Justice   http://courses.dce.harvard.edu/~envre145

Environment Ethics   http://courses.dce.harvard.edu/~envre120
Food-Matters    http://Food-Matters.TV

BBC News – BP in court hearing alleging misconduct in oil-spill payments

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/business-23227524
8 July 2013 Last updated at 11:10 ET
BP set aside $7.8bn (£5.2bn) to cover the likely compensation bill for civil claims
Related Stories

Oil giant BP is back in court in the US to try to limit compensation payouts from a fund set up to help those affected by the 2010 Deepwater Horizon oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico.

BP and businesses are laying arguments before three judges in New Orleans.

The oil giant wants the panel to overturn a federal judge’s ruling that upheld a claims administrator’s interpretation of the settlement.

The company claims some payments are for fictitious and inflated losses.

It says the administrator has wrongly allowed payments of hundreds of millions of dollars to businesses.

But the businesses’ lawyers say that BP underestimated how many claims it would have to meet……(read more).

Environmental Justice http://courses.dce.harvard.edu/~envre145
Environment Ethics http://courses.dce.harvard.edu/~envre120

Spies & Lies vs Money: EU & US line up huge trade deal amid espionage scandal

E120,

Glenn Greenwald: “Rogue” Actions of U.S. in Snowden Row Yield Latin American Offers of Asylum

E120, media,

The Eating Habits of Americans

E120, e130, food-matters,

India’s Food Security Scheme Met With Skepticism

E120, e130, food-matters,