Daily Archives: June 15, 2013

“Why in the World are They Spraying?” Geo-Englineering Documentary


Truthmediaproduction

Published on Aug 18, 2012

http://www.whyintheworldaretheyspraying.com/

People around the world are noticing that our planet’s weather is dramatically changing. They are also beginning to notice the long lingering trails left behind airplanes that have lead millions to accept the reality of chemtrail/geoengineering programs. Could there be a connection between the trails and our severe weather? While there are many agendas associated with these damaging programs, evidence is now abundant which proves that geoengineering can be used to control weather. In this documentary you will learn how the aerosols being sprayed into our sky are used in conjunction with other technologies to control our weather. While geoengineers maintain that their models are only for the mitigation of global warming, it is now clear that they can be used as a way to consolidate an enormous amount of both monetary and political power into the hands of a few by the leverage that weather control gives certain corporations over the Earth’s natural systems. This of course, is being done at the expense of every living thing on the planet. Directed/Produced by Michael J. Murphy and Produced/Edited by Barry Kolsky.. Written by Michael J. Murphy and Barry Kolsky.

http://www.witwats.com

Global Climate Change http://courses.dce.harvard.edu/~envre130
Environmental Justice http://courses.dce.harvard.edu/~envre145
Environment Ethics http://courses.dce.harvard.edu/~envre120
Cyprus International Institute (CII) (Harvard School of Public Health) http://Cyprus-Institute.us
Food-Matters http://Food-Matters.TV
EJ Film Festival
EE Film Festival
Climate Film Festival

Blue Gold – World Water Wars. (Full Film)


xK1N6D0Mx

Published on Mar 23, 2012

Global Climate Change http://courses.dce.harvard.edu/~envre130
Environmental Justice http://courses.dce.harvard.edu/~envre145
Environment Ethics http://courses.dce.harvard.edu/~envre120
Cyprus International Institute (CII) (Harvard School of Public Health) http://Cyprus-Institute.us
Food-Matters http://Food-Matters.TV
EJ Film Festival
EE Film Festival
Climate Film Festival

The War You Don’t See

The official trailer for John Pilger’s new film, ‘The War You Don’t See’, in UK cinemas from Sunday 12 December 2010 and on ITV two days later at 10.35pm

See: http://johnpilger.com/videos/the-war-you-dont-see-trailer

see also:

http://johnpilger.com/articles/john-pilger-s-latest-film-the-war-you-don-t-see-available-to-watch-online

and trailer at: http://widgets.distrify.com/widget.html#261

Environmental Justice http://courses.dce.harvard.edu/~envre145
Environment Ethics http://courses.dce.harvard.edu/~envre120

Naomi Klein on Global Neoliberalism


bigthink

See sequence of Naomi Klein’s pieces at:
http://www.youtube.com/user/bigthink/search?query=naomi%20klein

Published on Apr 23, 2012

Naomi Klein on the end of “El Modelo.”

Environmental Justice http://courses.dce.harvard.edu/~envre145
Environment Ethics http://courses.dce.harvard.edu/~envre120

Naomi Klein, Raj Patel, Amy Goodman: Crisis Capitalism

Joe Friendly

Uploaded on Jan 17, 2010

Amy Goodman in conversation with Naomi Klein, author of Shock Doctrine, Disaster Capitalism, and Raj Patel author of The Value of Nothing. Among subjects: Haiti relief, carbon trading. Event at New York Society for Ethical Culture, sponsored also by The Nation and The Indypendent. January 13, 2010. Camera: Joe Friendly

Global Climate Change http://courses.dce.harvard.edu/~envre130
Environmental Justice http://courses.dce.harvard.edu/~envre145
Environment Ethics http://courses.dce.harvard.edu/~envre120
Food-Matters http://Food-Matters.TV

Anna Lappé & Frances Moore Lappé with Raj Patel (4/13/10)

commonwealthclub

Uploaded on Apr 27, 2010

Eat, Drink, and Be Ecological About It

Anna Lappé, Author, Diet for a Hot Planet
Frances Moore Lappé, Author, Diet for a Small Planet
Raj Patel, Activist, Author, Stuffed and Starved, The Value of Nothing – Moderator

Nearly 40 years ago, before daughter Anna was a twinkle in her eye, Frances Moore Lappé published Diet for a Small Planet. Today, the pair still stand firmly behind this book which started as a one-page handout and would become the foundation of Annas own life’s work stressing that to understand world politics, we need first to understand food. Anna Lappé, one of Time’s “Eco- Who’s Who,” argues that there’s an unsettling connection between food production and global warming in her latest, Diet for a Hot Planet. The mother and daughter have traveled far and wide and conclude that “hunger is not caused by a scarcity of food but by a scarcity of democracy.” They encourage us to recognize food as a powerful starting point for solving one of our planet’s biggest problems.

Environmental Justice http://courses.dce.harvard.edu/~envre145
Environment Ethics http://courses.dce.harvard.edu/~envre120
Food-Matters http://Food-Matters.TV

Anna Lappé on Water Sustainability


afuturewecreate

Uploaded on Jun 5, 2011

A PR firm working for Dow Chemical contacted author Anna Lappé to submit a video for The Future We Create: The Future of Water, a web project about water sustainability sponsored by Dow Chemical.
This was the video that was rejected.
For more info about Dow & water go to: http://afuturewecreate.com

Environmental Justice http://courses.dce.harvard.edu/~envre145
Environment Ethics http://courses.dce.harvard.edu/~envre120
Food-Matters http://Food-Matters.TV

Moniz Explains To GOP Member How He Knows Humans Are Warming The Planet: ‘I Know How To Count’

http://thinkprogress.org/climate/2013/06/14/2148391/energy-secretary-explains-to-gop-member-how-he-knows-humans-are-warming-the-planet-i-know-how-to-count/

By Ryan Koronowski on Jun 14, 2013 at 5:17 pm

Yesterday, new Energy Secretary Ernest Moniz sat before a House Energy and Commerce subcommittee to discuss the Department’s proposed budget and ended up explaining basic climate science to a member of the majority party.

In an exchange with former committee chair Henry Waxman (D-CA) reported by E&E Daily, Moniz was blunt:

It’s indisputable that we are experiencing warming, and that the pattern of consequences that has long been expected, in fact, are appearing around us, unfortunately — typically at the higher end of the predicted ranges,” Moniz said, pointing to melting ice caps, intensified storms, droughts and wildfires.

In recent years, the subcommittee has been used to push false talking points about the proposed Keystone XL pipeline and to hold hearings just to throw climate denier talking points at real climate scientists.

Last year, Rep. David McKinley (R-WV) sponsored a raft of bills that would dismantle key public health and clean air provisions and undermine landmark environmental legislation. Last week, the committee marked up Rep. McKinley’s bill that would prevent the EPA from regulating toxic coal ash.

Unsurprisingly, McKinley’s asked Secretary Moniz if global warming was “primarly man-made, or natural and cyclical.”

Global Climate Change http://courses.dce.harvard.edu/~envre130
Environmental Justice http://courses.dce.harvard.edu/~envre145
Environment Ethics http://courses.dce.harvard.edu/~envre120

Fracking Is Already Straining U.S. Water Supplies | ThinkProgress

http://thinkprogress.org/climate/2013/06/15/2163531/fracking-is-already-straining-us-water-supplies/

By Tom Kenworthy, Guest Blogger on Jun 15, 2013 at 9:58 am

 

An Encana fracking operation in Colorado (AP photo).

As the level of hydraulic fracturing of oil and gas wells in the United States has intensified in recent years, much of the mounting public concern has centered on fears that underground water supplies could be contaminated with the toxic chemicals used in the well-stimulation technique that cracks rock formations and releases trapped oil and gas. But in some parts of the country, worries are also growing about fracking’s effect on water supply, as the water-intensive process stirs competition for the resources already stretched thin by drought or other factors.

Every fracking job requires 2 million to 4 million gallons of water, according to the Groundwater Protection Council. The Environmental Protection Agency, or EPA, has estimated that the 35,000 oil and gas wells used for fracking consume between 70 billion and 140 billion gallons of water each year. That’s about equal, EPA says, to the water use in 40 to 80 cities with populations of 50,000 people, or one to two cities with a population of 2.5 million each.

Some of the most intensive oil and gas development in the nation is occurring in regions where water is already at a premium. A paper published last month by Ceres, a nonprofit that works on sustainability issues, looked at 25,000 shale oil and shale gas wells in operation and monitored by an industry-tied reporting website called FracFocus.

Ceres found that 47 percent of these wells were in areas “with high or extremely high water stress” because of large withdrawals for use by industry, agriculture, and municipalities. In Colorado, for example, 92 percent of the wells were in extremely high water-stress areas, and in Texas more than half were in high or extremely high water-stress areas.

“Given projected sharp increases in production in the coming years and the potentially intense nature of local water demands, competition and conflicts over water should be a growing concern for companies, policymakers and investors,” the Ceres report concluded. It goes on to say that:

Prolonged drought conditions in many parts of Texas and Colorado last summer created increased competition and conflict between farmers, communities and energy developers, which is only likely to continue. … Even in wetter regions of the northeast United States, dozens of water permits granted to operators had to be withdrawn last summer due to low levels in environmentally vulnerable headwater streams.

….(read more).

Global Climate Change http://courses.dce.harvard.edu/~envre130
Environmental Justice http://courses.dce.harvard.edu/~envre145
Environment Ethics http://courses.dce.harvard.edu/~envre120

Climate Change Is Happening but We Can Meet the Challenge by Sarah van Gelder

http://www.yesmagazine.org/planet/climate-change-is-happening-but-we-can-meet-the-challenge

Icebergs at sunset

It can be hard for youth to deal with the overwhelming effects of climate change. But, by taking action, we can erode the hold that oil, fracking, and coal has on people and the environment

by Sarah van Gelder
posted Jun 13, 2013

Originally published in The Guardian.
http://www.guardian.co.uk/commentisfree/2013/jun/08/climate-change-challenge

Photo by Paxson Woelber.

“The level of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere just hit 400 parts per million,” I told Alex, my 23-year-old son, as we were catching up on news.

“So that’s it, huh?” he asked.

The news about the climate is daunting, but we don’t have to wait for skeptics or politicians to get it.

I couldn’t think what to say. Alex had just returned from college, a new graduate, ready to start his life as an adult. Like many members of his age group, Alex knows that 350 parts per million is the threshold for safe levels of carbon in the atmosphere. Pass that level and, climate scientists tell us, things get dicey: soils dry out, damaging food production. There is more frequent and more intense flooding, coastlines get inundated, species go extinct. Farming, which relies on predictable weather patterns, is disrupted, and dry land farming areas turn to desert. Forests die from new infestations and drought, and become more prone to monster fires.

Young people like Alex are coming of age in a world that’s changing much faster than was predicted just a few years ago. Already, scenes of wildfires, floods, drought, and storms border on apocalyptic. And so far, temperatures have risen less than one degree centigrade.

So what does a young person do when confronted with a global climate crisis? What does anyone do?

Based on a roundtable discussion with young leaders and informal conversations with others of all ages, I’ve come to believe that these three steps are essential:

First, let this reality sink in. This is not the future we thought we would have. Young people, especially, have the right to be disappointed, angry, and fearful. It will take courage to face this new normal, especially when so many others remain disconnected from what’s happening. By being mindful of your own emotions, you can experience fear or grief without being overwhelmed by those feelings. And by remaining alert to the way the climate crisis may show up in your life, you can be better prepared and more resilient ….(read more).

Global Climate Change http://courses.dce.harvard.edu/~envre130
Environmental Justice http://courses.dce.harvard.edu/~envre145
Environment Ethics http://courses.dce.harvard.edu/~envre120