Daily Archives: May 9, 2013

The Assassination of Hugo Chavez


AppIicationofSeIf

Published on Jan 11, 2013

Not my work. Full credit and copyright goes to Greg Palast. This film is not that recent so the title refers to the attempted coup de’tat on Venezualan President Hugo Chavez. It’s not meant to be an ominous insinuation about his recent health problems.

Environmental Justice http://courses.dce.harvard.edu/~envre145
Environment Ethics http://courses.dce.harvard.edu/~envre120

How to Start a Revolution – The Film – Gene Sharp

http://howtostartarevolutionfilm.com/

http://howtostartarevolutionfilm.com/index.php/about

http://howtostartarevolutionfilm.com/wp-content/uploads/video/HTSARTrailer2.html?iframe=true&height=80%&width=70%

Environmental Justice http://courses.dce.harvard.edu/~envre145
Environment Ethics http://courses.dce.harvard.edu/~envre120

We Are Not Ghosts – preview on Vimeo

from Mark Dworkin Plus 1 year ago / not yet rated

Fifty years ago Detroit was booming, with two million hard working people living the American Dream.

Then the auto industry fell on hard times and so did Detroit. Most people moved away, Whole neighborhoods turned Into wastelands.

But some have a vision for a new Detroit, as a human scaled city in a post industrial world. And with urban farms, peace zones, and spoken word poets they are starting to make it real.

Official Selection Langston Hughes African-American Film Festival. This is a preview for the 53 minute film available from Bullfrog Films – bullfrogfilms.com/catalog/wang.html

Environmental Justice http://courses.dce.harvard.edu/~envre145
Environment Ethics http://courses.dce.harvard.edu/~envre120
Food-Matters http://Food-Matters.TV
EJ Film Festival
EE Film Festival

Full Planet, Empty Plates: The New Geopolitics of Food Scarcity | Chapter 2. The Ecology of Population Growth | EPI

http://www.earth-policy.org/books/fpep/fpepch2

Throughout most of human existence, population growth has been so slow as to be imperceptible within a single generation. Reaching a global population of 1 billion in 1804 required the entire time since modern humans appeared on the scene. To add the second billion, it took until 1927, just over a century. Thirty-three years later, in 1960, world population reached 3 billion. Then the pace sped up, as we added another billion every 13 years or so until we hit 7 billion in late 2011. 1

One of the consequences of this explosive growth in human numbers is that human demands have outrun the carrying capacity of the economy’s natural support systems—its forests, fisheries, grasslands, aquifers, and soils. Once demand exceeds the sustainable yield of these natural systems, additional demand can only be satisfied by consuming the resource base itself. We call this overcutting, overfishing, overgrazing, overpumping, and overplowing. It is these overages that are undermining our global civilization.

The exponential growth that has led to this explosive increase in our numbers is not always an easy concept to grasp. As a result, not many of us—including political leaders—realize that a 3 percent annual rate of growth will actually lead to a 20-fold growth in a century.

…..(read more).

Global Climate Change http://courses.dce.harvard.edu/~envre130
Environmental Justice http://courses.dce.harvard.edu/~envre145
Environment Ethics http://courses.dce.harvard.edu/~envre120
Food-Matters http://Food-Matters.TV

Fact Sheet: Landfill Methane | Environmental and Energy Study Institute

http://www.eesi.org/fact-sheet-landfill-methane-26-apr-2013

Landfills are the third largest source of anthropogenic methane produced in the United States. According to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), landfill gas (LFG) comprises 17.7 percent of all U.S. methane emissions. Landfill methane in 2011 accounted for 103 million metric tonnes of carbon equivalent released into the atmosphere. Methane is a short-lived climate pollutant with significant warming potential, and over a 20 year period, one ton of methane causes 72 times more warming than one ton of carbon dioxide (CO2). Consequently, the mitigation of methane from existing landfills provides important climate benefits.

Mitigation of LFG can provide health benefits as well. Landfill gas is comprised of approximately 50 percent methane and 50 percent CO2, with trace levels of other compounds, including nitrogen, oxygen, hydrogen, and non-methane organic compounds (NMOCs) such as ammonia and sulfides. NMOCs include hazardous air pollutants that can increase the risk of cancer, cause respiratory issues, and produce strong and unpleasant odors. To mitigate both health and environmental impacts, the EPA currently regulates LFG from very large municipal solid waste (MSW) landfills, which must capture and safely dispose of methane and NMOCs from LFG. This process is typically accomplished either by flaring the gas or by converting the gas into energy.  (read more).

Global Climate Change   http://courses.dce.harvard.edu/~envre130
Environment Ethics   http://courses.dce.harvard.edu/~envre120

Rice harvest


OxfamAustralia

Published on May 8, 2013

A report released last week by the Hunger Alliance, a group of nine leading international development NGOs including Oxfam, showed that “the single most important thing governments can do to end global hunger is to support the millions of poor women farming tiny plots of land in developing countries”.

Global Climate Change http://courses.dce.harvard.edu/~envre130
Environmental Justice http://courses.dce.harvard.edu/~envre145
Environment Ethics http://courses.dce.harvard.edu/~envre120
Food-Matters http://Food-Matters.TV

BBC News – Asteroid 2012 DA14 in record-breaking Earth pass

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/science-environment-21442863
15 February 2013 Last updated at 14:28 ET
By Jason Palmer Science and technology reporter, BBC News

Nasa coverage of the moment the asteroid passed closest to Earth

Continue reading the main story

Related Stories

Q&A: Asteroid and comet impactsMeteor injures hundreds in RussiaWorld ‘must tackle space threat’

An asteroid as large as an Olympic swimming pool has raced past the Earth at a distance of just 27,700km (17,200mi) – the closest ever predicted for an object of that size.

It passed far closer even than the geosynchronous satellites that orbit the Earth, but there was no risk of impacts or collisions.

Its closest approach was at 19:25 GMT.

For regions in darkness, it should have remained visible until about midnight through good binoculars or a telescope.

The asteroid’s arrival was preceded by a damaging meteor event in Russia on Friday – but indications from the meteor’s path suggest that the two events are entirely unrelated – just a “cosmic coincidence”, as Alan Fitzsimmons of Queens University Belfast told BBC News.

Global Climate Change http://courses.dce.harvard.edu/~envre130
Environmental Justice http://courses.dce.harvard.edu/~envre145
Environment Ethics http://courses.dce.harvard.edu/~envre120