Daily Archives: April 13, 2013

Global Warming 20 Years Later (June 23, 2008)


starrdreams

Uploaded on Jun 26, 2008

NASA scientist looks back on his historic Congressional testimony.

Global Climate Change http://courses.dce.harvard.edu/~envre130
Environmental Justice http://courses.dce.harvard.edu/~envre145
Environment Ethics http://courses.dce.harvard.edu/~envre120

EPA Administrator Nomination Hearing

http://www.c-spanvideo.org/program/312050-1

EPA Administrator Nomination Hearing

Apr 11, 2013

Senate Committee Environment and Public Works

Gina McCarthy, the President’s nominee to be Administrator of the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), testifies before the Senate Environment and Public Works Committee.

1 hour, 54 minutes | 46 Views

Global Climate Change http://courses.dce.harvard.edu/~envre130
Environmental Justice http://courses.dce.harvard.edu/~envre145
Environment Ethics http://courses.dce.harvard.edu/~envre120

Current Drought and Global Warming – C-SPAN Video Library

http://www.c-spanvideo.org/program/3246-1

Current Drought and Global Warming

Jun 29, 1988

House Committee Science, Space and Technology | Natural Resources, Agriculture Research and Environment House Committee Science, Space and Technology | Science, Research and Technology

The subcommittees held a joint hearing on the threat of global warming. This video includes the original advertisements that aired in 1988l.
hours, 11 minutes | 28 Views

http://www.c-spanvideo.org/program/Warm

Global Climate Change http://courses.dce.harvard.edu/~envre130
Environmental Justice http://courses.dce.harvard.edu/~envre145
Environment Ethics http://courses.dce.harvard.edu/~envre120

The Fossil Fuel Resistance – Bill McKibben

http://www.rollingstone.com/politics/news/the-fossil-fuel-resistance-20130411?print=true

As the world burns, a new movement to reverse climate change is emerging – fiercely, loudly and right next door

by Bill McKibben

APRIL 11, 2013

It got so hot in Australia in January that the weather service had to add two new colors to its charts. A few weeks later, at the other end of the planet, new data from the CryoSat-2 satellite showed 80 percent of Arctic sea ice has disappeared. We’re not breaking records anymore; we’re breaking the planet. In 50 years, no one will care about the fiscal cliff or the Euro crisis. They’ll just ask, “So the Arctic melted, and then what did you do?”

Here’s the good news: We’ll at least be able to say we fought.

After decades of scant organized response to climate change, a powerful movement is quickly emerging around the country and around the world, building on the work of scattered front-line organizers who’ve been fighting the fossil-fuel industry for decades. It has no great charismatic leader and no central organization; it battles on a thousand fronts. But taken together, it’s now big enough to matter, and it’s growing fast.

The Fossil Fuel Resistance: Meet the New Green Heroes

Americans got to see some of this movement spread out across the Mall in Washington, D.C., on a bitter-cold day in February. Press accounts put the crowd upward of 40,000 – by far the largest climate rally in the country’s history. They were there to oppose the Keystone XL pipeline, which would run down from Canada’s tar sands, south to the Gulf of Mexico, a fight that Time magazine recently referred to as the Selma and the Stonewall of the environmental movement. But there were thousands in the crowd also working to block fracking wells across the Appalachians and proposed Pacific coast deep-water ports that would send coal to China. Students from most of the 323 campuses where the fight for fossil-fuel divestment is under way mingled with veterans of the battles to shut down mountaintop-removal coal mining in West Virginia and Kentucky, and with earnest members of the Citizens Climate Lobby there to demand that Congress enact a serious price on carbon. A few days earlier, 48 leaders had been arrested outside the White House – they included ranchers from Nebraska who didn’t want a giant pipeline across their land and leaders from Texas refinery towns who didn’t want more crude spilling into their communities. Legendary investor Jeremy Grantham was on hand, urging scientists to accompany their research with civil disobedience, as were solar entrepreneurs quickly figuring out how to deploy panels on rooftops across the country. The original Americans were well-represented; indigenous groups are core leaders of the fight, since their communities have been devastated by mines and cheated by oil companies. The Rev. Lennox Yearwood Jr. of the Hip Hop Caucus was handcuffed next to Julian Bond, former head of the NAACP, who recounted stories of being arrested for integrating Atlanta lunch counters in the Sixties. (read more)

Global Climate Change http://courses.dce.harvard.edu/~envre130
Environmental Justice http://courses.dce.harvard.edu/~envre145
Environment Ethics http://courses.dce.harvard.edu/~envre120
Bill McKibben

Hurricane Katrina – The Untold Story


Travis Vadon

Published on May 14, 2011

See Hurricane Katrina first hand through the eyes of Brian Williams, MSNBC’s news reporter. Hopefully your racism and prejudices become a thing of the past.

Global Climate Change http://courses.dce.harvard.edu/~envre130
Environmental Justice http://courses.dce.harvard.edu/~envre145
Environment Ethics http://courses.dce.harvard.edu/~envre120

Refuge of Last Resort – The true Hurricane Katrina Story


TheyClownPeopleDown

Uploaded on Jan 13, 2012

This no holds documentary chronicles the days before, during and after Hurricane Katrina. Told from the viewpoint of several families stuck in New Orleans, this moving and unflinching story says so much by saying so little. Most of this footage has never been seen by the public, and there is absolutely no stock footage used in this film.

Global Climate Change http://courses.dce.harvard.edu/~envre130
Environmental Justice http://courses.dce.harvard.edu/~envre145
Environment Ethics http://courses.dce.harvard.edu/~envre120

Lost City Of New Orleans (BBC Documentary)


ScienceWorId

Published on Jan 23, 2013

Modern day New Orleans was a city that defied the odds. Built on a mosquito-infested swamp surrounded by water, it sits in a bowl 2.5m below sea-level. Its very existence seemed proof of the triumph of engineering over nature.

But on the 29 August 2005 the city took a direct hit from Hurricane Katrina and overnight turned into a Venice from hell. In the chaos that followed the worst natural disaster in American history, a forensic investigation has begun to find out what went wrong and why. Scientists are now confronting the real possibility that New Orleans may be the first of many cities to face extinction.

Professor Ivor Van Heerden of Louisiana State University’s Hurricane Centre used computer modelling to simulate hurricane paths across New Orleans. He had been appointed by the state to discover why New Orleans flooded so catastrophically and had his own unique methods of gathering data. By collecting eye-witness testimonies from residents and the stopped clocks from their flooded homes, Van Heerden pieced together a timeline of the levee breaches. He also took samples from the breach sites for analysis.

His results were shocking. He believed they showed that there was a design fault in the levees. “The old system that led to the design and the building of them, the funding, the decision making process, didn’t work. We’ve got to change that and part of that is going to be for the federal government and the engineers corps to step up to the plate and say we screwed up.”

Over the years the levees and dams stopped annual floods from the Mississippi River. As a result sediments that were brought down by the river to replenish the land were prevented from reaching their natural destination. Gradually Louisiana started to lose its coast. Today it has the highest rate of coastal land loss in North America. Every 20 minutes an area the size of Wembley stadium is swallowed up by the sea.

Shea Penland, a coastal geologist at the University of New Orleans, knows every inlet, every cove and every stretch of marsh that surrounds the city. He also knows that Louisiana’s wetlands, thought of as wasteland for years, are in fact critical to the survival of the city. Providing protection against storm surges, these wetlands are a natural defence against the onslaught of hurricanes. As he says: “The first line of defence isn’t the levee in your backyard, the first line of defence is that marsh in your back yard and we’re learning what that means.”

After the disaster, he chartered a seaplane to investigate the overnight loss to Louisiana’s precious wetlands. What he discovered sounded like the death knoll for the city. In just one night, Louisiana had lost three-quarters of the wetland that it usually loses in one year. Without this protection, New Orleans is a sitting duck against future storms.

And the problems don’t just stop there. The city itself is sinking. Since 1878 it has dropped by 4.5m, one of the highest rates of subsidence in the entire United States. Once again it’s mainly human intervention that is to blame. According to Professor Harry Roberts, a geologist at the Louisiana State University: “It’s been accelerated by man’s efforts to keep the water out of the city. When you pump the water out of those kinds of soils they start to collapse and even more importantly the organic material oxidises and goes away so you’ve taken out one component of the soil, and all that adds up to subsidence.”

Global Climate Change
http://courses.dce.harvard.edu/~envre130
Environmental Justice
http://courses.dce.harvard.edu/~envre145
Environment Ethics
http://courses.dce.harvard.edu/~envre120
Clearing House for Environmental Course Material
https://environmentaljusticetv.wordpress.com/
Cyprus International Institute (CII) (Harvard School of Public Health) http://Cyprus-Institute.us
Food-Matters http://Food-Matters.TV