Daily Archives: April 5, 2013

James Hansen: Why I must speak out about climate change


TEDtalksDirector

Published on Mar 7, 2012

http://www.ted.com Top climate scientist James Hansen tells the story of his involvement in the science of and debate over global climate change. In doing so he outlines the overwhelming evidence that change is happening and why that makes him deeply worried about the future.

Global Climate Change http://courses.dce.harvard.edu/~envre130
Environmental Justice http://courses.dce.harvard.edu/~envre145
Environment Ethics http://courses.dce.harvard.edu/~envre120

Hansen urges Obama to abandon Keystone XL

http://www.rtcc.org/hansen-urges-obama-to-abandon-keystone-xl-pipeline/
Last updated on 4 April 2013, 1:07 pm

By John Parnell

NASA’s climate science chief James Hansen has urged President Obama to reject the Keystone XL tar sands pipeline.

Writing in the LA Times, Hansen said approving the plan to build a pipeline from the Canadian tar sands to refineries on the US gulf coast, would deliver a “crushing blow” to the climate.

“Researchers now say that the Alberta tar sands contain 360 to 510 billion tons of carbon – more than double that of all oil burned in human history,” he wrote.

“The President stands at a fork in the road: Rejecting the pipeline will show the world we are serious and determined to be on the right side of history. Approving it will signal we are too entrenched with business-as-usual to do what’s right by the people, planet and future generations..

“All of President Obama’s achievements will fade if he doesn’t act swiftly and decisively on climate change. Rejecting Keystone is the first step.”

Hansen announced his imminent retirement from NASA’s Goddard Institute for Space Studies this week. He said he could not contribute to legal action against the US government if he was working for one of its agencies.

James Hansen has urged President Obama to block Keystone XL as a first step to a positive legacy on climate change (Source: Flickr/Chesapeakeclimate/Josh Lopez)

The State Department will issue its recommendation to President Obama later this year with no decision expected until late summer 2013.

Global Climate Change http://courses.dce.harvard.edu/~envre130
Environmental Justice http://courses.dce.harvard.edu/~envre145
Environment Ethics http://courses.dce.harvard.edu/~envre120

James Hansen – The pipeline to disaster

http://www.latimes.com/news/opinion/commentary/la-oe-hansen-keystone-obama-20130404,0,3169887.story

By James Hansen

April 4, 2013

In March, the State Department gave the president cover to open a big spigot that will hitch our country to one of the dirtiest fuels on Earth for 40 years or more. The draft environmental review of the Keystone XL pipeline acknowledges tar sands are nasty stuff for the environment, but concludes that the project is OK because this oil will get to market anyway — with or without a pipeline.

A public comment period is underway through April 22, after which the department will prepare a final statement to help the administration decide whether the pipeline is in the “national interest.” If the conclusion is yes, a Canadian company, TransCanada, gets a permit to build a pipeline to transport toxic tar sands through our heartland, connecting to refineries in the Gulf of Mexico, for likely export to China.

Around the world, emissions of heat-trapping gases like carbon dioxide continue to soar. Australia is now finishing “the angry summer” — 123 extreme weather records broken in 90 days — which government sources link to climate change. Last year, 2012, was also the hottest year on record in the contiguous United States.

Yet a bipartisan chorus says the pipeline is no big deal. Some suggest the administration is better off focusing on stronger EPA regulations, as if it were an either-or proposition. Others say we need the temporary jobs. Still others torture logic by claiming that not building the pipeline will be worse because that would force the tar sands to be shipped overseas, with the greater carbon footprint that entails — even though analysts say this is the fate of most Keystone XL oil anyway. …..(read more).

Global Climate Change http://courses.dce.harvard.edu/~envre130
Environmental Justice http://courses.dce.harvard.edu/~envre145
Environment Ethics http://courses.dce.harvard.edu/~envre120