Daily Archives: December 20, 2012

Sustainable Business: Lynda Gratton, professor of management practice at the London Business School


TheGuardian

Published on Dec 19, 2012

Sustainable Business: Lynda Gratton, professor of management practice at the London Business School

Subscribe HERE: http://bitly.com/UvkFpD

Lynda Gratton, professor of management practice at the London Business School, talks to Jo Confino about how to bring sustainability values into the heart of a corporation and the role of leaders in driving change. Gratton argues that for organisations to be able to sustain themselves and the world, they must build an inner resilience, connect with their communities and supply chains and tackle urgent global challenges. But are companies moving fast enough?

Global Climate Change http://courses.dce.harvard.edu/~envre130
Environmental Justice http://courses.dce.harvard.edu/~envre145
Environment Ethics http://courses.dce.harvard.edu/~envre120

Senator Boxer Builds Climate Change Clearinghouse: ‘We Are Going To Work On Supporting A Major Bill’

http://thinkprogress.org/climate/2012/12/19/1358351/senator-boxer-builds-climate-change-clearinghouse-we-are-going-to-work-on-supporting-a-major-bill/

By Stephen Lacey on Dec 19, 2012 at 9:16 am

If we see any Congressional action on climate in 2013, it’s likely to come from the Democrat-controlled Senate.

In recent weeks, Senator Barbara Boxer (D-CA) has indicated that Democrats — and possibly some Republicans — will issue a series of small and large bills related to climate change in the 113th Congress.

“I think you are going to see a lot of bills on climate change,” said Boxer to reporters earlier this month. She said that three other Senators already have bills in the works for pricing carbon and adapting infrastructure to intensifying extreme weather.

As Chairwoman of the Environment and Public Works Committee, Boxer is attempting to leverage concerns about climate after Superstorm Sandy and build a coalition of climate-conscious lawmakers to craft legislation. Yesterday, she talked about creating a “clearinghouse” on climate to help organize efforts. The Hill reports:

Boxer said she will co-chair the clearinghouse alongside the chairmen of the Senate Energy and Natural Resources Committee and the Senate Foreign Relations Committee. Boxer first announced the idea earlier in December, and it crystallized further at a meeting Tuesday, she said.

Global Climate Change http://courses.dce.harvard.edu/~envre130
Environmental Justice http://courses.dce.harvard.edu/~envre145
Environment Ethics http://courses.dce.harvard.edu/~envre120

From Doha To Divestment: The Search For A Real Strategy To Combat Climate Change

http://thinkprogress.org/climate/2012/12/18/1354181/from-doha-to-divestment-the-search-for-a-real-strategy-to-combat-climate-change/

By Climate Guest Blogger on Dec 18, 2012 at 3:30 pm

by Jim Shultz

If you wanted to design a global crisis that the world’s political systems would be particularly incapable of solving, it would be hard to do better than climate change.

Unlike a meltdown of the banking system or an attack from the sky, climate change does not come upon us suddenly and command our sense of urgency. It creeps closer towards us year-by-year as record heat, decimating storms, and historic ice melt. Most of the measures proposed in response bear the uncomfortable feel of sacrifice – paying more for gas or living less large in our material possessions – and sacrifice does not make for good politics. Add in the powerful corporate machinery engaged in protecting coal and oil interests and it is little wonder that the political process is frozen.

As a result, the most significant and irreversible threat that our generation poses to the future is marked by an almost complete political incapacity to act. The only force with any chance of getting the political process to move is citizen action. But what kind, applied where, and with what aim?

Global Climate Change http://courses.dce.harvard.edu/~envre130
Environmental Justice http://courses.dce.harvard.edu/~envre145
Environment Ethics http://courses.dce.harvard.edu/~envre120

ACES and Ecosystem Markets 2012

http://www.conference.ifas.ufl.edu/aces/index.html
Conference Overview

ACES and Ecosystem Markets 2012 is an international collaboration of three dynamic communities – A Community on Ecosystem Services (ACES), the Ecosystem Markets Conference, and the Ecosystem Services Partnership (ESP). The conference will provide an open forum to share experiences and state-of-the-art methods, tools, and processes for assessing and incorporating ecosystem services into public and private decisions. The focus of the conference will be to link science, practice, institutions and resource sustainable decision making by bringing together ecosystem services communities from around the United States and the globe.

Environment Ethics http://courses.dce.harvard.edu/~envre120

The Ethics of Geoengineering (Pt. 2)

http://www.yaleclimatemediaforum.org/2012/12/the-ethics-of-geoengineering-part-2/

E120, e130,

The Ethics of Geoengineering – 1

Ethics-of-Geoengineering

First of a Two-Part Series
David Appell —  December 13, 2012

Options for engineering the climate system, some long-dismissed by many as a vestige of Buck Rogers, are getting additional attention as near-term prospects for an effective political remedy remain bleak. But with research into the subject come increasing numbers of ethical questions yet to be resolved.

Is geoengineering an ethical response to the problem of climate change? What moral issues are raised by any deliberate manipulation of the climate system? Should research into its science and engineering proceed, or does that step create a moral hazard by making emissions cutbacks seem less urgent?

There are more questions, to be sure, and few easy answers. But scientists, environmentalists, and philosophers increasingly are grappling with the complexities and tradeoffs of climate solutions long considered by many to be drastic, as they fear the world seems unable or unwilling to get carbon out of its energy diet.

This first of a two-part series examines geoengineering and its potential side effects, including recent studies that find the costs are relatively small. Part two will explore some of the ethical questions being raised about geoengineering by philosophers, scientists, and others.

Engineering the Climate

Geoengineering, also called climate engineering, involves the deliberate modification of Earth’s natural systems to reduce global warming. The term itself is not vanilla and all-encompassing, and not all geoengineering proposals are alike.

See also, Part 2: https://environmentaljusticetv.wordpress.com/2012/12/20/the-ethics-of-geoengineering-pt-2/